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What exactly does Bridging connections do?

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PhatSRT4    0

So I have a cable modem hooked to a gigabit switch, 2 computers on the switch. Both computers have dual gigabit nic's on them. If I have both nic's hooked up and the connections bridged to give me 1 ip does this help speed up the connection or is this just more for load balancing.

I guess what my real question is, what exactly does bridging do, and would it help increase network performance?

Thanks!

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Bgnn32    8

Where to begin with this one......

First you should have a router not a switch, unless your modem is a modem/router.

Second, Bridging will not result in increased performance, bridging is set up to connect two networks, similar to routing but a different way of accomplishing the goal. This article explains it well: http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...e.mspx?mfr=true

Third you could set up load balancing between the two NIC's and you should see an increase in performance between the two PC's, but the bottle neck for the internet is your connection running into the house, so unless you were to get a second cable line and load balance between the two modems you will not get a preformance increase off of the internet connection

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+BudMan    3,691

Good response Bgnn32!

But I have a feeling his "modem" is really a gateway or modem/router combo.. What is the model number of your "modem" device phatsrt4?

To answer your question directly NO! you would never ever bridge 2 interfaces on the same network together.. its utterly pointless!!

There is a large amount of FUD out there about bridging connections together for increased bandwidth, have answered quite a few here right on neowin.

As bgnn32 has already pointed out, teaming your nics together on your PC could give you increased bandwidth between the PCs - but this has little to do with your internet connection..

if you have say a 5mbit internet connection -- it does not matter if your machine is connected to this modem device at 10,100,1000, 10k mbit.. Your limit will be the 5mbit, period!

Here is some more info about a network bridges

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_bridge

To be honest, the home user with router and a few machine would rarely have any use for bridging.. If anything it would be to connect a wired and wireless network. Or say if you had a IEEE 1394 connection to one machine, an you wanted to put this on your network - you could bridge the 1394 connection to your ethernet interface. But I hear that MS pulled tcp/ip support on 1394?

But no highlighting your interfaces an clicking bridge is not going to make your internet any faster - nor is it going to make talking to your other machine faster.. if your PC came with dual nics, I would assume the driver supports teaming or bonding them together.. RTFM would be my suggestion ;)

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PhatSRT4    0

Thanks for the responses.... You guys answered my questions perfectly.

As far as my setup goes, I have a Cable Modem, running into a TZ170, with a lynksys wireless router in that (for roommate to connect), and a gigabit switch that my 2 computers use.

The reason for the switch is that I usually bit torrent on 1 computer and then end up transferring the files to my other one, and just wanted to speed up the transfer from one computer to another. I am fully aware that Wan speed would not increase, I was just wondering about bridging connections for increased Lan transfer.

Again, you cleared everything up.

Thanks!

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+BudMan    3,691

Unless your gig network is all housed up, or you have some really nice disks.. More than likely any current bottleneck in transfer speed between the 2 machines would be disk related.

Grab a copy of IPerf see what your wire speed is at, from there - do some math an you can see if the bottle neck is your disks or wire. If the wire -- sure then you could team them.

But normally gig is at least double the max your hdd could sustain, etc..

Just kind of went over this in this thread. Where someone was/is having ****ty gig performance.

http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?show...72720&st=15

Useful info starts with my post = #20 ;) Before that is a bunch of nonsense about cat6, adhoc vs switch, the pci bus :rolleyes: etc..

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