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172.25.* is a LAN IP?


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-Alex-

I work in a call center. When we get to work, we log into our phone which updates our availability status on a piece of software called Total View, then we login to Windows on the PC which gives us access to one program, and one program only: Remote Desktop Connection. From there, we open an RDC to one of the five servers, depending on which team we are on, and login to Novell from there, where we can access the programs we need to.

I noticed the IP of the server I connect to and though because it began 172.* instead of 192.*, it may have been a publicly available RDC, but when trying to connect from home, the connection times out.

So, I did a WHOIS search on the IP I connect to and it showed as a private LAN address, is this right?

I've left the last two subnets off the IP, but you can see from searching under 172.25.1.1 using this link.

Any explanation?

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k22
I work in a call center. When we get to work, we log into our phone which updates our availability status on a piece of software called Total View, then we login to Windows on the PC which gives us access to one program, and one program only: Remote Desktop Connection. From there, we open an RDC to one of the five servers, depending on which team we are on, and login to Novell from there, where we can access the programs we need to.

I noticed the IP of the server I connect to and though because it began 172.* instead of 192.*, it may have been a publicly available RDC, but when trying to connect from home, the connection times out.

So, I did a WHOIS search on the IP I connect to and it showed as a private LAN address, is this right?

I've left the last two subnets off the IP, but you can see from searching under 172.25.1.1 using this link.

Any explanation?

http://www.jpsdomain.org/networking/nat.html

Private IP Address Ranges

This is the "classic" RFC1918.

Class From To CIDR Mask Decimal Mask

Class "A" or 24 Bit 10.0.0.0 10.255.255.255 /8 255.0.0.0

Class "B" or 20 Bit 172.16.0.0 172.31.255.255 /12 (or more typically /16) 255.240.0.0 (or 255.255.0.0)

Class "C" or 16 Bit 192.168.0.0 192.168.255.255 /16 (or more typically /24) 255.255.0.0 (or 255.255.255.0)

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Bgnn32

192.168.x.x is not the only private Scheme, 10.x.x.x and 172.16.x.x - 172.31.x.x are accetable and widely used as well.

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Leddy

From what I've seen larger networks generally use 172.* instead of 192.168.*. Maybe it gives them more structure by allowing them an extra tier?

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gertin
From what I've seen larger networks generally use 172.* instead of 192.168.*. Maybe it gives them more structure by allowing them an extra tier?
They shouldn't be using 172.* (172/8), because only 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255 (172.16/12) are assigned for private networks according to RFC 1918.

I can't think any specific reasons why larger networks(?) use that range, but it might be because VPN IPs are less likely to collide with existing IPs on a external network, the home network of an employee for example.

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I am Reid

Wait you told me that you are a witness protection thing, and that you cant have strangers see your name or some crap like that. Yet you talk to many random strangers over the phone everyday.

Im confused

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jack
I can't think any specific reasons why larger networks(?) use that range, but it might be because VPN IPs are less likely to collide with existing IPs on a external network, the home network of an employee for example.

That has to do with subnetting. With class "A" you can divide your LAN in more subnets than with class "C". So two computers with the same IP but different subnetmasks can exist in one net but in different subnets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subnetwork

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jwjw1
Wait you told me that you are a witness protection thing, and that you cant have strangers see your name or some crap like that. Yet you talk to many random strangers over the phone everyday.

Im confused

:whistle:

I'm sure the Network Adminstrator could anwser all his questions

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gertin
That has to do with subnetting. With class "A" you can divide your LAN in more subnets than with class "C". So two computers with the same IP but different subnetmasks can exist in one net but in different subnets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subnetwork

172.16/12 is not class A though and 172/8 is not entirely assigned for private networks.

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Nashy
I work in a call center. When we get to work, we log into our phone which updates our availability status on a piece of software called Total View, then we login to Windows on the PC which gives us access to one program, and one program only: Remote Desktop Connection. From there, we open an RDC to one of the five servers, depending on which team we are on, and login to Novell from there, where we can access the programs we need to.

Just FYI. When you login to your phone you arn't actually logging into TotalView. You are logging into your phone system (Avaya maybe), which then updates your Call Centre's Control Management System (CMS).

Then IEX grabs the information from CMS and updates accordingly. The only information it has listed live is:

- Logged In

- Logged Out

- Hold

- Outbound Call

- Inbound Call

- AfterCallWork (or whatever your centre calls it)

- Aux Codes

Everything else is entered manually, and reports on your adhearnace are pulled from it as this is the 'server' so to speak that TotalView uses.

CMS shows ever bit of information attached to each phone on any particular IVR.

Nothing to do with your original question.... my bad :-p

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bobbba
From what I've seen larger networks generally use 172.* instead of 192.168.*. Maybe it gives them more structure by allowing them an extra tier?

Many larger organisations use the 10.x.x.x range because it is private and gives you a lot of freedom when designing your IP structure.

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+BudMan

Second that 10.x.x.x is the normal choice for larger orgs.. BTW.. if they are using 172.* then um their not going to be able to get to a LARGE chunck of the net, ie all the address ranges they step on.

As already mentioned - 172 is not a class A address, so you can not use 172.* an expect not to step on somebody.

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-Alex-
Just FYI. When you login to your phone you arn't actually logging into TotalView. You are logging into your phone system (Avaya maybe), which then updates your Call Centre's Control Management System (CMS).

I said that :p Seeee..

we log into our phone which updates our availability status on a piece of software called Total View

And yeah, on TotalView, the statuses I've seen on are:

Idle (Waiting for a call)

On a call (Self-explainitory)

On hold (Again...)

Dialing out (Outbound calls)

Not ready (Stops you getting a call)

Floorwalking (Helping other people)

Back office (Processing paperwork)

Sick (Guess ;))

AWOL (Not logged in when you're meant to be)

:)

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Nashy
I said that :p Seeee..

And yeah, on TotalView, the statuses I've seen on are:

Idle (Waiting for a call)

On a call (Self-explainitory)

On hold (Again...)

Dialing out (Outbound calls)

Not ready (Stops you getting a call)

Floorwalking (Helping other people)

Back office (Processing paperwork)

Sick (Guess ;) )

AWOL (Not logged in when you're meant to be)

:)

Do you use Avaya? And what C/C do you work in, what company?

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-Alex-

Not entirely sure if we use Avaya; the phones themselves are 'Nortel Networks' phones... the same phones as in United 93 actually. We use these:

M3905Set.jpg

Link here

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Nashy

Ah so Nortel. Another of the big brands.

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-Alex-

Oh yeah, you asked what company it is. Forgot to mention, it's for Scottish Power but the company I work for is Vertex (BPO - or business process outsourcing company) :)

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kizzaaa
I work in a call center. When we get to work, we log into our phone which updates our availability status on a piece of software called Total View, then we login to Windows on the PC which gives us access to one program, and one program only: Remote Desktop Connection. From there, we open an RDC to one of the five servers, depending on which team we are on, and login to Novell from there, where we can access the programs we need to.

I noticed the IP of the server I connect to and though because it began 172.* instead of 192.*, it may have been a publicly available RDC, but when trying to connect from home, the connection times out.

So, I did a WHOIS search on the IP I connect to and it showed as a private LAN address, is this right?

I've left the last two subnets off the IP, but you can see from searching under 172.25.1.1 using this link.

Any explanation?

The contact centre I work at uses IEX Total view as well. Just a random fact.

Not entirely sure if we use Avaya; the phones themselves are 'Nortel Networks' phones... the same phones as in United 93 actually. We use these:

M3905Set.jpg

Link here

We have a custom made soft phone which logs into our Nortel Networks phone.

I work for AAPT in Sydney.

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betasp

I have seen and worked at a few "large" companies that did not have a proper "private" subnet setup. Yes, it can hose some things up but I have seen many issues cleaned up in the routers and DNS (which is really making the matter worse, and one day WILL require a complete overhaul). I suspect that is what is going in here.

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