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It's time to enable UAC.

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ObiWanToby    35

UAC is meant for a user to run as a normal user when doing day to day tasks. I don't see the big deal here. Mac OSX is very similar, when you are on a "non admin account" it will prompt for a password when performing an administrator function.

UAC is starting to force people to run as a limited user, so if something nasty gets on their system from opening an email attachment, it wont have admin privileges. Since Vista is so new, no one has taken into account that a limited user is now the default. Well, almost everyone, http://talk.google.com, Google talk, actually installs without prompting.

UAC is a good thing, it is ridiculus to have a world where millions of Windows users are running as a full admin to do all their work. With proper security practices, Anti Viruses aren't even needed. Don't download odd files from odd websites, don't run as an administrator....etc.

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jmc777    1
Yeah, you can do it. But why would you, given the option?

I think many do it so that they can feel l33t, and refer to themselves as "pro" users.

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+BeLGaRaTh    43

Hope we're not gonna have another 30 page thread on the benefits/disadvantages of UAC :(

Damn, I posted in here, how do I unsubscribe to the thread :(

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FATILA    4

Windows 98 had no firewall and doesn't need one thankyou very much, none of this fancy rubbish like DEP and memory protection and it works FLAWLESSLY! I run mainframes for 12 enterprises from my global datacenter and don't need to be talked down to like a child so there!

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freak_power    0
freak_power never understood that HE doesn't understand UAC.

8 months ago because of UAC and Nvidia not knowing enough about UAC/Vista, Nforce Raid drivers would fail to load...i'm not just stupid not to notice things like that...

UAC is meant for a user to run as a normal user when doing day to day tasks. I don't see the big deal here. Mac OSX is very similar, when you are on a "non admin account" it will prompt for a password when performing an administrator function.

UAC is starting to force people to run as a limited user, so if something nasty gets on their system from opening an email attachment, it wont have admin privileges. Since Vista is so new, no one has taken into account that a limited user is now the default. Well, almost everyone, http://talk.google.com, Google talk, actually installs without prompting.

UAC is a good thing, it is ridiculus to have a world where millions of Windows users are running as a full admin to do all their work. With proper security practices, Anti Viruses aren't even needed. Don't download odd files from odd websites, don't run as an administrator....etc.

I guess once you setup all the software, games, drivers...UAC doesn't pop that much, only if you're trying to access system folders or change system settings...not that much annoying. My main reason why i disabled UAC at first place is that certain drivers/software would fail or installation would be broken because of UAC. Now, after a year almost everybody catched up not to mention that there is plenty support for x64 Vista software and hardware wise...UAC goes online for me...cause everything is perfect.

Can't wait for SP to sort out certain annoying bugs and i think Vista is on good track...

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Mordkanin    225
I'm not; UAC is written to protect people from screwing up their systems. MacOS is a simpler OS for the common idiot. It doesn't need UAC. Not that I dislike it, I think it's elegant and simple and a joy to use, but nobody writes much software for it compared to Windows, which I reckon is probably the biggest reason MS has managed to dominate the market and Apple is getting dowright violent in their ads trying to win back their user base. People who don't generally do more than browse the net and check their email and occasionally write a school paper don't need to be using Vista.

UAC was written to give running code the least access it needs to perform its function, with the end goal of preventing any exploits in it from being very harmful.

The whole 'it's just second guessing the user' thing that so many people seem to think about it is complete bull****, and generally only stated by people who don't actually know what UAC is, but claim to be 'power users' regardless.

Edited by MioTheGreat

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jamend    0

I've never had to disable UAC... because I run as administrator.

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xankazo    69

I wonder if administrators are just as secured, becuase no nagging screen ever pops up. I totally forget it's even on.

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Mordkanin    225

(Nevermind. Neowin suddenly decided to let me edit my above post. It wouldnj't let me do it before, so this was a correction.)

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abecedarian paradoxious    326

As MioTheGreat said, 'UAC was written to give running code the least access it needs...'

Is it Microsoft's fault that XP users never created 'user' accounts and only ran software as an 'admin' (in spite of suggestions of that)?

No. It's the end user- the people now complaining about UAC that didn't do what they should have and became used to this practice and never complained to the programmers about what was being done wrong.

Now, with UAC, Microsoft is enforcing logical (task or system-scope oriented) programming practices... and has also given 'bad programmers' programs a way to run too, with virtualization and such. But if programmers would have used logical, and suggested, choice of writing end-user software (as opposed to 'system administrator' related software) for 'users' instead of 'administrators' (as they should have done after NT was released), this problem wouldn't be....

There's an old saying: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Well, it wasn't broke but no one used it properly and consequently it was broken. So Microsoft fixed it.

And since Vista was available, people have 'fixed' Microsoft's 'fix' and consequently 'broke' something else that would've worked otherwise.

And now that some want to undo their 'fix' other things are getting broken... things that wouldn't have been broken at all if things were left well enough alone.

Edited by Regression_88

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jamend    0
I wonder if administrators are just as secured, becuase no nagging screen ever pops up. I totally forget it's even on.

It's disabled by default for the administrator account.

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soldier1st    40

there is a free app that allows you to keep uac on but without the prompts but if you ask me uac doesent really bother you much after your done installing your stuff,by having uac on it gives ie(which i never use) protected mode which helps keep ie safe meaning less of a need for spyware immunizers,an extra click is worth it if it helps to keep you safe.

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abcdefg    0
Is it Microsoft's fault that XP users never created 'user' accounts and only ran software as an 'admin' (in spite of suggestions of that)?

No. It's the end user

24920.gif

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Unimatrix Xero    37

i did disable UAC at first bu tnow ive reenabled it, due to SP1, cant say ive really found it a pain as it used to be, dont know if im just getting use to it, or weather im just not seing it as much LOL

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midway40    0
I think many do it so that they can feel l33t, and refer to themselves as "pro" users.

It is quite the opposite in the Linux world where running as user is "l33t" instead of running as root (admin). If you post on a Linux forum that you run as root all the time be prepared for the negative responses you get, lol.

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Mordkanin    225
It is quite the opposite in the Linux world where running as user is "l33t" instead of running as root (admin). If you post on a Linux forum that you run as root all the time be prepared for the negative responses you get, lol.

There are those of us who feel the exact same way about UAC. I don't think any of the people who I see here who disable UAC are really that bright....

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midway40    0
There are those of us who feel the exact same way about UAC. I don't think any of the people who I see here who disable UAC are really that bright....

I hear ya, I am a proponent of UAC myself. My stint in Linux made me realize the importance of user/admin control. It wasn't implemented well in past Windows though (who wants to log out of user and back in as admin to do simple admin tasks?).

Remember the ANI exploit that was going around earlier this year that also affected Vista? I read on another forum someone was hit by this on his Vista machine in which UAC was turned off. If UAC was on and the user noticed the unusual trigger of the UAC window caused by the exploit he could have prevented its installation.

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raskren    0
I don't think any of the people who I see here who disable UAC are really that bright....

I tend to agree.

A real "power user" with real PC security knowledge would keep important security features turned on!

Mac, Linux, and UNIX users seem to be smart enough to know not to use the root account all the time. Why aren't Windows users?

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+forster    188
There are those of us who feel the exact same way about UAC. I don't think any of the people who I see here who disable UAC are really that bright....

From what Ive read there's idiots on both sides of the fence.

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FATILA    4

I have still yet to hear a technically valid reason for turning UAC off, bar "mission critical" applications initially not working.

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jamend    0

I guess I'm just lucky. I run as administrator in XP/Vista and root in Linux, and I don't have any problems with it.

Or maybe it's just that I'm not stupid enough to check out that "FreeHotNudes.scr" email or run rm -r / out of curiousity...

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Mordkanin    225
I hear ya, I am a proponent of UAC myself. My stint in Linux made me realize the importance of user/admin control. It wasn't implemented well in past Windows though (who wants to log out of user and back in as admin to do simple admin tasks?).

Remember the ANI exploit that was going around earlier this year that also affected Vista? I read on another forum someone was hit by this on his Vista machine in which UAC was turned off. If UAC was on and the user noticed the unusual trigger of the UAC window caused by the exploit he could have prevented its installation.

Actually in many cases, the ANI exploit was stopped merely by the lower IL of the process, without a single prompt.

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ObiWanToby    35
Windows 98 had no firewall and doesn't need one thankyou very much, none of this fancy rubbish like DEP and memory protection and it works FLAWLESSLY! I run mainframes for 12 enterprises from my global datacenter and don't need to be talked down to like a child so there!

No one cares...just fyi makes you sound...pompous.

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kouhii00    1

i would soooooo PICK UAC over lame ass symantec av at my work comp....when it's on....system becomes complete halt...only 512mb of ram...the AV process took up nearly 80MB of ram+other lazy ass IT admin junk.

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