'Soul Catcher' Computer Chip Due


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Hum

A computer chip implanted behind the eye that could record a person's every lifetime thought and sensation is to be developed by British scientists.

"This is the end of death," said Dr. Chris Winter, of British Telecom's artificial life team. He predicted that within three decades it would be possible to relive other people's lives by playing back their experiences on a computer. "By combining this information with a record of the person's genes, we could recreate a person physically, emotionally and spiritually." :huh:

Dr. Winter's team of eight scientists at BT's Martlesham Heath Laboratories near Ipswich calls the chip the 'Soul Catcher.' It would be possible to imbue a new-born baby with a lifetime's experiences by giving him or her the Soul Catcher chip of a dead person, Dr. Winter said. The proposal to digitize existence is based on a solid calculation of how much data the brain copes with over a lifetime.

Ian Pearson , BT's official futurologist, has measured the flow of impulses from the optical nerve and nerves in the skin, tongue, ear, and nose. Over an eighty year life, we process 10 terrabytes of data, equivalent to the storage capacity of 7,142,857,142,860,000 floppy disks.

Dr. Pearson said, "If current trends in the miniaturization of computer memory continues at the rate of the past 20 years - a factor of 100 every decade - today's 8-megabyte memory chip norm will be able to store 10 terrabytes in 30 years."

British Telecom would not divulge how much money it is investing in the project, but Dr. Winter said it was taking 'Soul Catcher 2025' very seriously. He admitted that there were profound ethical considerations, but emphasized that BT was embarking on this line of research to enable it to remain at the forefront of communications technology.

"An implanted chip would be like an aircraft's black box and would enhance communications beyond current concepts," he said. "For example, police would be able to use it to relive an attack, rape, or murder from the victim's viewpoint to help catch the criminal."

Other applications would be less useful but more frightening. "I could even play back the smells, sounds, and sights of my holiday to my friends," Dr. Winter said.

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Lant

I like the idea of being able to record experiences, so you could go back and experience stuff again. But "imbuing a new-born baby with a lifetime's experiences" is ethically questionable to me.

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  • 3 weeks later...
skiiper

wouldnt be bad to live another life time would it? It will be great to have a child which does not involve school, since tht was all done in the previous life time. although after 2 or 3 I might just tell them to destroy it.

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primexx

great technology, but when in the wrong (read: police) hands, it becomes the ultimate big brother.

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nomis_nehc

how the heck would they record feelings? just because it's seen through the eyes, i can't imagine it would generate the same feelings in each individual.

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James7

10 terabytes of data in our lifetime? not likely!

We process more than that in one day. Unless they are talking about some serious compression :|

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NienorGT

10TB? You mean that in few years I will have more porn on my PC than all my life-time soul? :rofl:

Give me a break....

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Cadium

Very interesting...

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kizzaaa
Over an eighty year life, we process 10 terrabytes of data, equivalent to the storage capacity of 7,142,857,142,860,000 floppy disks.

10TB seems too small for someone's "entire life".

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mrchetsteadman

Im guessing 10TB worth of word docs?

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MidnightDevil

I remember them fine.. tks anwyay lol.

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