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would love criticism

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beautiful.blood    0

I was watching someone give a lecture on photography and he said one of the ways to get better is to take pictures everyday, get criticism, and then work on it.

I've posted my pictures on deviantART and flickr, but considering they get who knows how many images an hour it easily just gets thrown in the mix never really to be seen. So basically I'm just asking for your help, I will hopefully be posting new pictures here everyday, or every couple of days, just to get some kind of feedback/criticism.

So to get started I was working on night photography last night and this is what I came up with:

3133636416_a18dc1e8ea.jpg

3133632406_3530163a9a.jpg

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Jordan Green    2

first one is technically good, but compositionally nothing going for me.

second one, is much better! the comp is better with the rule of thirds, could have done with more depth of field though.

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beautiful.blood    0

I actually had a question about that the aperture is a way to deal with depth of field correct, but when I seem to mess with it all it does it make the image either brighter or darker. Am I doing something wrong or is just my camera that I am using (Canon Powershot SX10 IS)?

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the evn show    138

Shoot earlier in the evening. Setup your tripod around half an hour before sunset when there's still a bit of light in the sky and you'll get much more pleasing colors. Here's a good introduction to shooting Christmas lights. Composition on the second is better than the first. Assuming this is your house: I'd pull out the security sign for the picture: it's kinda ugly and distracting. I'd also consider opening the blinds and letting the shears obscure the inside of the house.

All things considered they're not too bad.

I actually had a question about that the aperture is a way to deal with depth of field correct, but when I seem to mess with it all it does it make the image either brighter or darker. Am I doing something wrong or is just my camera that I am using (Canon Powershot SX10 IS)?

Apature, shutter speed, ISO setting controll how much light comes into your camera.

If you increase the aperture size?that is: make the F-number smaller?but don't change anything else then your photos will get brighter.

Likewise, if you decrease the aperture size?f-number gets bigger?but don't change anything else then your pictures will be darker.

The way to keep things in check is to balance changes in aperture with changes to shutter speed and ISO.

For example, if you get perfectly exposed pictures (not too dark, not too bright) with your camera set to ISO 400, Shutter Speed: 1/60 second, Aperture: F/4.0 then you can change those settings but keep them balanced to get new efExamplemple

You want to have more depth of field by using a smaller aperture so you jump from up by 2 stops to F8. Changing only that will reduce the amount of light in the picture by a a huge amount (each stop halves the number of light). To counter that you have a couple of choices.

  • Make your film more sensitive by increase the ISO rating from 400 to 1600 (400->800->1600 is 2 stops worth of sensitivity)
  • Leave the shutter open longer to allow more light to enter the camera (1/60 -> 1/30 -> 1/15 is 2 stops worth of light)
  • Some combination of changing ISO and shutter speed.

Using a higher ISO is usually an option of last resort because it increases the "noise" in your pictures. When you look in the black areas and see that color fuzz: that's noise. You might use this option if you can't increase the aperture because you don't want to sacrifice depth of field or if you can't increase shutter speed because there is motion you're trying to capture.

That leaves the option of increasing shutter speed. For these types of picture there's no reason you can't increase the shutter speed. There's no subject motion and you're using a tripod (or some other stable shooting platform).

So for your next picture you'd use settings like Apature: F8.0, Shutter Speed: 1/15, ISO: 400.

If you don't change anything about the scene then you should get another perfectly exposed picture but this time the larger aperture should give you more depth of field. You can continue to play with settings until you get a combination you like.

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beautiful.blood    0

thanx evn for the awesome explanation ill have to try that out tomorrow.

I will try and work on the Christmas lights again as well, I'll get it in tune with the rule of thirds I tend to forget about that everytime I start shooting.

So thanx again and I'll post again tomorrow

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Scorbing    517
I was watching someone give a lecture on photography and he said one of the ways to get better is to take pictures everyday, get criticism, and then work on it.

I've posted my pictures on deviantART and flickr, but considering they get who knows how many images an hour it easily just gets thrown in the mix never really to be seen. So basically I'm just asking for your help, I will hopefully be posting new pictures here everyday, or every couple of days, just to get some kind of feedback/criticism.

So to get started I was working on night photography last night and this is what I came up with:

3133636416_a18dc1e8ea.jpg

3133632406_3530163a9a.jpg

Excellent!

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beautiful.blood    0

hope everyone had a great holiday mine wasnt to bad there was food and presents so nothing to be upset about.

i took these photos tonight the lighting is alright i still cant really get my head all the way around it but i figure the best way is just to try stuff.

the lights i am using are two 250 watt work lights i bought at lowes the other day, its not the best lighting but it was cheap and a lot brighter than my desk lamp.

3136762375_28789e1077.jpg

3136760533_c2c3e4dda8.jpg

3136756143_84b612f4f8.jpg

I was just messing with shutter speed and 2nd curtain flash and this just happened

3137579724_977951f556.jpg

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Sir Topham Hatt    361

I like the very first one (at the top), but perhaps you should try shooting really close to the ground (I mean lying on your front!) as then the house will look taller and more towering, menacing.

The seconf set though, perhaps you could try monochroming the closer ones of the guitar? Also, a little polish before hand always made close ups good.

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Sillysam    1

They are all well composed, good job (Y)

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wgrt    0

I'm going to nit pick

the very first one needs a more interesting view point and maybe try messing around with a longer exposure, painting in the darkness with a torch

the second one doesn't really do it for me personally maybe because the focal point is just burnout I'm not sure

the guitars are better though I think you should try either diffusing the light or bouncing it off the ceiling as the background is hazy from the strong light

and dusting your guitar might help! :)

the 3rd picture of the guitar is my faveourite!

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