3D Television!


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Barney T.

Check out the buzz around the tech world:

Here is a sneak look at the next big thing in technology: 3D Television!

3D Coming to a Living Room Near You

3D Television

Samsung 3D Televisions

3D Blu-Ray Players

If you saw the newest 3D movies out (Avatar, for instance) you can see what a step forward this can be....... (Y)

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soumyasch

http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=863546

Most here are not too warm to that idea. At least as long as 3D requires those glasses.

If you saw the newest 3D movies out (Avatar, for instance) you can see what a step forward this can be....... (Y)

Not sure if the theatre experience can be used as a baseline for the 3D experience. In theatres, you have the entire front wall as the screen. With a TV you will only have a small window of 3D on your wall. I am skeptical of the experience it can offer. If at all, computer monitors (IMO) will have a better chance, as you sit much nearer to it.

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Phantom Helix
http://www.neowin.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=863546

Most here are not too warm to that idea. At least as long as 3D requires those glasses.

Not sure if the theatre experience can be used as a baseline for the 3D experience. In theatres, you have the entire front wall as the screen. With a TV you will only have a small window of 3D on your wall. I am skeptical of the experience it can offer. If at all, computer monitors (IMO) will have a better chance, as you sit much nearer to it.

I though the 3D glasses for in home viewing had something special to them, are they not connected by a cord?

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soumyasch
I though the 3D glasses for in home viewing had something special to them, are they not connected by a cord?

Can be, but probably aren't. They will have to be long enough to at least reach th couch. Plus, if there are at least two or three people watching the TV, can't even start to imagine the tanglement the wires will result in.

If they indeed are wired, I will say thats a bigger fail.

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Phantom Helix

Well ok I was wrong, not connected by a cord, but they are connected to the TV, which means they are not just your simple polarized glasses.

being battery powered I can imagine they are gonna be heavy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCD_shutter_glasses

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Sir Topham Hatt

So all those who have just bought a Blu-Ray player, it's out of date already?

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Phantom Helix
So all those who have just bought a Blu-Ray player, it's out of date already?

Between blu-ray 3D and Blu-ray Managed copy, yes...

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Growled
Most here are not too warm to that idea. At least as long as 3D requires those glasses.

I refuse to wear the glasses to sit around and watch TV.

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soumyasch
Well ok I was wrong, not connected by a cord, but they are connected to the TV, which means they are not just your simple polarized glasses.

being battery powered I can imagine they are gonna be heavy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCD_shutter_glasses

Shutter glasses are heavy and if they are anything like those used by Nvidia 3D-compatible monitors, easy to get out of sync.

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DaDude
So all those who have just bought a Blu-Ray player, it's out of date already?

Not if you have a PS3. That can be updated.

I don't see how 3D TV is going to be successful. Yeah, it's going to look cool watching a few movies pop out at you, but it's not something I want to be watching everyday, especially if you have to wear glasses. Most of the time after a hard days work, I just want to flop on the couch, turn the TV on and watch something on TV for entertainment. That's all. I could really care less if they're popping out of the screen.

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Phantom Helix
Not if you have a PS3. That can be updated.

I don't see how 3D TV is going to be successful. Yeah, it's going to look cool watching a few movies pop out at you, but it's not something I want to be watching everyday, especially if you have to wear glasses. Most of the time after a hard days work, I just want to flop on the couch, turn the TV on and watch something on TV for entertainment. That's all. I could really care less if they're popping out of the screen.

Well the PS3 won't do the managed copy because 1. it is a console and 2. managed copy requires new hardware

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DaDude

Are you sure? I thought the PS3 was the only Blu-ray player than can be updated to do Managed Copy. Hmmm....

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Phantom Helix
Are you sure? I thought the PS3 was the only Blu-ray player than can be updated to do Managed Copy. Hmmm....

No it is the only one currently known to able to be updated to 3D

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Ironman273
Analysis: Why you won?t be buying a 3D TV (until you are forced to)

Every consumer electronics company in creation is launching 3D television sets this year. They?re counting on you tossing your two-year-old flatscreen in the bin and spending big on one of these babies. They?re wrong about your wish to play along, but they?ll get you in the end.

The Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas has become the biggest of its kind in the world, and this week every major player is using it to announce new product lineups for 2010. By far the biggest new category is 3D TVs. Everybody?s got one, and they?re counting on early adopters buying them this year, the richer middle classes to follow in 2011, and everybody to have one in the lounge before 2015.

They are almost entirely wrong.

For decades manufacturers were assured of a steady stream of business; first it was the fancy new black and white TVs, then bigger screen sizes, then colour TV, then brighter displays, then bigger displays, then non-curved displays, then black matrix displays, then various flavours of flatscreen, then HDTV. Each generation was more lucrative than the previous one because per-unit manufacturing costs dropped while the price consumers were willing to pay increased. It was a fantastic market to be in, as long as you didn?t invest in capital equipment too late and got stuck with worthless machinery.

This taught the TV-manufacturing industry two lessons: the market is always hungry for the next big thing, and being on the cutting edge is safer than being behind the curve. So, by those rules, 3D TVs will sell like hotcakes and the time to start selling them is ASAP.

Take a close look, however, and the numbers tell a different story. LCDs haven?t replaced plasma screens at nearly the rate that was expected, and non-HD flatscreens aren?t being replaced fast either, despite the increasing availability of HD programming. In fact, the last big upgrade cycle was from TVs with big-ass tubes to flatscreens; the former were thrown out in such quantities that many countries still have piles of the things waiting to be recycled or safely disposed of.

Moving from a black and white TV to a colour TV was a giant leap upward in the quality of entertainment. Moving from a tube TV to a flatscreen was, for many, a matter of peer pressure. (Go on, admit it. You were embarrassed to have friends around and watch them snigger at your old tubed dinosaur, which is why you gave it up for something much more expensive with much worse picture quality.) 3D TV offers neither of these benefits.

For the foreseeable future, any decent 3D TV will require you to wear glasses. Big, heavy, dorky glasses with cables running from them. That will give you a picture with depth, if you happen to be watching a new 3D Blu-ray disc or one of what will be a very small number of 3D channels, but there will be you?ll be sacrificing picture clarity and brightness. For this you will be paying many tens of thousands of rands.

But the young woman you lure back to your place (and this is the single most important motivator for young men to buy consumer electronics) won?t be impressed, because she won?t be able to tell from looking at it that you have the newest Auto 3D DisplayTron With Double Depth from Sony, rather than last-seasons standard HD flatscreen. Not without turning it on, certainly.

So you can spend a lot of money to make your viewing experience more uncomfortable and impress nobody but your geek friends, or spend a little money and buy an awesome last-generation set that you can watch without plugging your face into it. Factor in competing standards, uncertainty about how future-proof early models will be, and you?re left with a vanishingly small initial market. Which means higher unit prices, which will further decrease uptake.

Still, they?ll get you in the end, whether you like it or now. That plasma on your wall isn?t going to last forever, and by the time it burns out you probably won?t have a choice. The manufacturers who have and will continue to spend so big on tooling up for 3D aren?t going to maintain their old-style production lines indefinitely. By the time you buy again, the only thing on the shelves may be various flavours of 3D. Just hope it will have improved by then.

Source: The Daily Maverick

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DaDude
Well the PS3 won't do the managed copy because 1. it is a console and 2. managed copy requires new hardware
No it is the only one currently known to able to be updated to 3D

http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=2894

"Most existing BD players and devices don't support Managed Copy, so in all likelihood a new player will be needed. A notable exception is the PS3: back in April 2008, Sony engineers claimed that, once Managed Copy was adopted, it would be possible to add the feature to the console via a firmware upgrade."

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Phantom Helix

Well as of this moment it is only a claim, bottom of the first paragraph in that link says "Possibly" the PS3

But I stand corrected

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carmatic

well if i replace my burnt out plasma with a 3d set, that's just inevitable change and progress... its not like im being forced to buy it, like the digital switchover or something...

didnt Philips have their '3DWOW' system which didnt need glasses? but they dropped it... its actually 2d plus depth, but its still better than 2d with no depth...

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Sir Topham Hatt

I just hope that the price of standard HD tele's come down because of this :)

I will be going fully HD/Blu Ray this year.

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John S.

Great...now I can replicate that 3D headache that I get from the movies at home (Y)

There's no way I'll ever buy one of these.

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DaDude
Great...now I can replicate that 3D headache that I get from the movies at home (Y)

There's no way I'll ever buy one of these.

+1

Part of the reason I upgraded to HD was because it was much kinder to my eyes. HDTVs give a much clearer picture and LCDs put a lot less strain on my eyes. However, 3D TVs?not the case. So, I don?t see how this technology is going to appeal to me.

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Ironman273

Here's another point of view with some good points.

I'm Sold On 3D TVs...And I Kind of Hate Myself For It

500x_500x_coolglasses_01.jpg

I'm a skeptic who's seen every consumer-grade 3D TV in existence from manufacturers like Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony. I've seen OLED 3D, plasma 3D, LCD 3D and LED LCD 3D. And I've finally made up my mind on the matter.

Even though every technology coming to market this year requires glasses, even though 90% of 3D implementation is unwatchable, even though the tech will inevitably be dated within the next few years...

I would buy a 3D TV this year.

(Now realize there are about a thousand caveats to that statement, which is what this entire piece is really about.)

500x_img_0218_01.jpg

I wouldn't buy any old 3D tech.

There is only one TV I've seen?out of very, very many?that captivated me like Avatar on IMAX. While most of the time I couldn't wait to pull the glasses off my face, LG's 60-inch plasma prototype, slated to be a real product later this year, sort of rocked my world with nearly flicker-free performance. Panasonic's Viera V Series TVs, using similar methods on paper (plasma with shutter glasses), was a close second, as it strobed more. And I'm still curious as to why that was the case?whether it was shutter glasses, the lighting environment, the source material (the LG showed more animation, which looks great in 3D) or the display itself that made the difference.

Not trusting my own eyes, I sent two other members of Giz to look at each set as well. They didn't see a difference. So I'm willing to call Panasonic and LG a tie.

As for OLED and LCDs?what you see from companies like Sony, Toshiba and Sharp?the image strobes AND the motion is choppy (imagine a low frame rate video game on top of flickering film). Those techs are a complete pass. (I know, OLED is supposed to be great. In 3D, it most certainly isn't.)

500x_img_0197_02.jpg

I wouldn't buy anything but a BIG 3D TV.

Without fail, the bigger the 3D, the better the illusion. Anything under 50 inches is basically a joke, unless it's your computer monitor or something. And I will say, even though Vizio's XVT Pro television wasn't my favorite experience (it's an LCD and thereby less smooth), the fact that it was 72-inches meant that a plane's wing almost hit me in the nose.

I wouldn't pay much more for a 3D TV.

LG told me that the 3D-capable version of their plasma set will only be a $200 premium over the non-3D version. I'm willing to pay that extra cost as an idiotic early adopter, knowing that the television is a nice HDTV when it's not showing 3D. Of course, to be completely fair, that $200 premium applies to a premium set to begin with, not a bargain bin TV that many of us settle for out of sanity.

500x_vizio__3d_tv_01.jpg

I wouldn't watch 3D all the time.

Even in some content utopia where I could watch everything I ever wanted in 3D (right now, we're limited to promises from Blu-ray, select broadcasters and some DirecTV), I wouldn't choose to with the current glasses/TV setup. Even the best experience I had was tiring, and unless I'm really getting something special from meticulously produced media (like movies, or maybe even video games), I'm going to do what I do best when watching television: be lazy. For hours. Eye strain is a major concern.

Back to that content point for a moment, every movie that Pixar is making from here on out promises to be in 3D. Video games should be somewhat turn-key to make the 3D transition as they'd like. And Hollywood is definitely pushing 3D. But within 2010, it's tough to envision a lot more than extremely limited broadcast and yet another viewing of the inevitable Avatar Extra Special Edition Blu-ray.

I wouldn't replace my 2D TV.

If I weren't looking for a new TV already, 3D alone wouldn't sway me to plop down a few grand?at least not today?a decision influenced by both the imperfect experience and the limited media. It'd be nice to have, sure. But most people can and will wait, I'd bet.

500x_vizio__3d_tv-4_01.jpg

I wouldn't TOTALLY overlook an LCD curveball.

One manufacturer let me in on a secret?the LCDs on the CES show floor are mostly refreshing at 4ms. But by the time these TVs ship, they'll be refreshing at 3ms, thanks to an industry-wide chemical-based update in LCD panels. Plasma is on top for the moment, but 3D LCDs shouldn't be quite as bad by the time the TVs actually ship in Q3. (Though, they may still be noticeably inferior to plasma.)

So that's my view. Go ahead, heckle me and my glasses that will look stupid and dated, well, they look stupid and dated today. But watching the best 3D TVs?namely, top tier plasma?is actually a pretty amazing experience...one that might be worth the sometimes literal headaches.

500x_500x_3d_glasses-22.jpg

And these chicks in bikinis totally agree with me.

Source: Gizmodo

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SMELTN

man, I just can't get into this 3D craze. It definitely looks like everything is going to 3D but I just don't like it. Sometimes I get disoriented with the glasses on and watching a 3D movie, and on top of that, I just think having 4 pair of 3D glasses sitting on your TV stand and having to put them on while sitting on your couch in a dark room watching a movie looks stupid.

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Xilo

3D discriminates against glasses wearers.

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