How dangerous is Isopropyl alcohol?


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sicburns

We use Isopropyl alcohol whipes on work to clean Print heads, Cellphones, Keyboards, Mouses.

Are there any safety issues i should worry about? And how dangerous is it if you eat food after you used this whipes or rub in your eyes.

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08993

We use Isopropyl alcohol whipes on work to clean Print heads, Cellphones, Keyboards, Mouses.

Are there any safety issues i should worry about? And how dangerous is it if you eat food after you used this whipes or rub in your eyes.

It's essentially a solvent that will break down oils, but it also evaporates quickly. Prolonged contact with the skin isn't a good idea and being in an enclosed space with gallons of the stuff wouldn't be very clever either. Wipes are no problem as any residue will evaporate.

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DarkBlade

Yeah the residue from it will evaporate in the air so quick that I wouldn't worry about it

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Futura

Very flammable. VERY. I've got lots of it, so I know.

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MasterC

Very flammable. VERY. I've got lots of it, so I know.

Interesting how having a lot of one thing suddenly makes you an expert :p

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Andre S.

You don't need to be any sort of expert to know that concentrated alcohol is highly flammable.

So, as for health concerns:

Isopropyl alcohol is an irritant of the eyes and mucous membranes. By analogy with effects seen in animals, it may cause central nervous system depression at very high concentrations [Hathaway et al. 1991]. Exposure to 400 ppm isopropyl alcohol for 3 to 5 minutes resulted in mild irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat; at 800 ppm, these symptoms were intensified [Hathaway et al. 1991]. An oral dose of 25 ml in 100 ml of water produced hypotension, facial flushing, bradycardia, and dizziness [Hathaway et al. 1991]. A postmortem examination in a case of massive ingestion revealed extensive hemorrhagic tracheobronchitis, bronchopneumonia, and hemorrhagic pulmonary edema [NLM 1992]. Prolonged skin contact with isopropyl alcohol caused eczema and sensitivity [Genium 1993]. Delayed dermal absorption is attributed to a number of pediatric poisonings that have occurred following repeated or prolonged sponge bathing with isopropyl alcohol to reduce fever. In several cases symptoms included respiratory distress, stupor, and coma [Hathaway et al. 1991; NLM 1992]. Epidemiological studies suggested an association between isopropyl alcohol and paranasal sinus cancer; however, subsequent analysis suggests that the "strong-acid" process used to manufacture isopropyl alcohol may be responsible for these cancers [ACGIH 1991]. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has concluded that the evidence for the carcinogenicity of this process is adequate but that the evidence for isopropyl alcohol itself is inadequate [iARC 1987].
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthguidelines/isopropylalcohol/recognition.html
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Burned

Material Safety Data Sheet

Isopropyl Alcohol

Appearance Clear, colorless liquid

Odor Rubbing alcohol

Boiling Point 82 ?C

Melting Point -89 ?C

Vapor Pressure 44 @ 25 ?C (mm Hg)

Vapor Density (Air = 1) 2.1

Specific Gravity 0.79 @ 20 ?C / 4 ?C

Solubility in Water Miscible in water

Volatile by Volume 100% @ 21 ?C

Evaporation Rate 2.83 (BuAc =1)

Stability Stable

Incompatibility Heat, flame, strong oxidizers, acetaldehyde, acids, chlorine, ethylene

oxide, isocyanates.

Hazardous

Decomposition Products

Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may form when heated to

decomposition.

Conditions to Avoid Heat, flame, ignition sources and incompatibles.

Hazardous Polymerization Will not occur.

Flash Point 12 ?C

Auto Ignition Temperature 399 ?C

Flammable Limits LEL: 2.0

UEL: 12.7

Fire Extinguishing Spray Water spray, dry chemical, alcohol foam, or carbon dioxide. Water spray

may be used to keep fire exposed containers cool, dilute spills and

nonflammable mixtures, protect personnel attempting to stop leak and

disperse vapors.

Explosion Above flash point, vapor air mixtures are explosive within flammable limits

Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Spilled or

Released:

Ventilate area of leak or spill. Remove all sources of ignition. Wear appropriate

personal protective equipment as specified on section 5. Isolate hazard area.

Keep unnecessary and unprotected personnel from entering. Contain and recover

liquid when possible Use non-sparking tools and equipment. Collect liquid in an

appropriate container or absorb with an inert material and place in a chemical

waste container. Do not use combustible materials, such as saw dust. Do not flush

to sewer! If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to disperse the vapors, to

protect personnel attempting to stop leak, and to flush spills away from exposures.

Disposal Method Whatever cannot be saved for recovery or recycling should be handled as

hazardous waste and sent to a RCRA approved incinerator or disposed in a RCRA

approved waste facility. Processing, use or contamination of this product may

change the waste management options. State and local disposal regulations may

differ from federal disposal regulations. Dispose of container and unused contents

in accordance with federal, state and local requirements.

Handling and Storage

Protect against physical damage. Store in a cool, dry well-ventilated location,

away from any area where the fire hazard may be acute. Outside or detached

storage is preferred. Separate from incompatibles. Containers should be bonded

and grounded for transfers to avoid static sparks. Storage and use areas should be

No Smoking areas. Use non-sparking type tolls and equipment, including explosion

proof ventilation. Containers of this material may be hazardous when empty since

they retain product residues.

noted above. Contact with strong oxidizers may cause fire or explosion.

Vapors can flow along surfaces to distant ignition source and flash back.

Sensitive to static discharge.

Special Information In the event of a fire, wear full protective clothing and NIOSH-approved self-

contained breathing apparatus with full face piece operated in the

pressure demand for other positive pressure mode.

Potential Health Effects:

Inhalation Inhalation of vapors irritates the respiratory tract. Exposure to high concentrations has a

narcotic effect, producing symptoms of dizziness, drowsiness, headache, staggering,

unconsciousness and possibly death.

Ingestion Ingestion can cause drowsiness, unconsciousness, and death. Gastrointestinal pain,

cramps, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may also result. The single lethal dose for a

human adult = about 250 mls (8 ounces).

Skin Contact May cause skin irritation with redness and pain. May be absorbed through the skin with

possible systemic effects.

Eye Contact Vapors cause eye irritation. Splashes caused severe irritation, possible corneal burns and

eye damage.

First Aid Measures:

Inhalation In case of Inhalation, remove to fresh air. In not breathing, give artificial respiration. If

breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Call a physician.

Ingestion Give large amounts of water to drink. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious

person. Get medical attention.

Skin Contact Immediately flush skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Call a physician if

irritation develops.

Eye Contact Immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes, lifting lower and

upper eyelids occasionally. Get medical attention immediately.

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Izlude

is this the same stuff you use to get rid of gunk on the CPU? or am i thinking of the other kind of alcohol? i've used both kinds and even had a taste by accident. i'm alright.

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Berserk87

is this the same stuff you use to get rid of gunk on the CPU?

yes

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techbeck

Its flammable and will go boom...nuff said. Why? You wanting to drink it or something?

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d4diesel

as far as i know, there isnt much danger to it but since it evaporates really quickly, i would make sure there is a good ventilation where you work (even though wipes barely have much on them anyways). Apart from that, constant contact to skin also leaves your skin dry after sometime. remember it breaks down oil and you skin secretes oil to keep it moist. so, at worst case scenario, if you dont wear gloves, you will have dry hands at the end of you work shift and might have to use some hand moisturizer.

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Futura

Interesting how having a lot of one thing suddenly makes you an expert :p

Not an expert, but I must say I experimented quite a lot :p

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DigitalE

As long as you have common sense and remember that it's flammable you should be just fine..

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  • 2 weeks later...
sicburns

Ok people, thanks for clearing that up.

Also thanks for the responses so quickly.

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