About to go fully Ubuntu


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mcloum

This is what's wrong with Linux right there! Look at the crap you have to do just to get something as simple as screen resolution correct.

Xorg is probably using the old monitor settings (refresh rate, resolution, bit depth etc). Try regenerating it:

sudo aticonfig --initial

or just:

sudo aticonfig

or:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
sudo aticonfig --initial

I haven't used the ati config tools for a while, so you might need to use some variation of that.

Well, if you are having problems with the proprietary driver, you could always try the open source radeonhd or the default xserver driver.

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tablet_user

This is what's wrong with Linux right there! Look at the crap you have to do just to get something as simple as screen resolution correct.

damn whatever distro needed all that blows. On gentoo i typed Xorg -configure and it did it all for me.

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still1

Let me tell you this first... people go to Linux and get frustrated very quickly because it is not easy like windows.

Its a whole new OS so be patient with problems and there is a lot of learning to do. All the best.

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.Neo

Let me tell you this first... people go to Linux and get frustrated very quickly because it is not easy like windows.

Its a whole new OS so be patient with problems and there is a lot of learning to do. All the best.

Well, isn't that the whole point why people get frustrated with Linux? The thing I loved about switching from Windows to Mac OS X was that it didn't require that much learning at all. And while Ubuntu itself has progressed quite nicely I still feel that the software available for it is subpar.

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revparadigm

Well, isn't that the whole point why people get frustrated with Linux? The thing I loved about switching from Windows to Mac OS X was that it didn't require that much learning at all. And while Ubuntu itself has progressed quite nicely I still feel that the software available for it is subpar.

This is exactly what is stopping me from going totally Linux. The lack music software that I used in Windows [sony Acid Pro] is the no.1 stumbling block. I love Linux Mint's Ubuntu distro.

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ViperAFK

for audio -> give Banshee, Exaile, Amarok, Foonix a go (Although nothing compares to Winamp/foobar in Windows, but hey its something different)

Also, head on over to omgubuntu.co.uk to check out new program releases, HQ themes, icons etc.

Also, give chrome a try if you want as a browser, Docky, play with compiz etc

have fun!

Yeah there's many great players in linux, I also recommend clementine, yarock, deadbeef. I am actually using rhythmbox right now as the last.fm plugin in the latest version is the best I've ever used(And I don't have much music on my laptop so I like to listen to last.fm radio)

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xxxxxx.xxxxxx

Rhythmbox user here and it's a nice little media player, does what i want which is play music. :rolleyes:

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PhillAholic

Ubuntu is great for new beginners but do not expect to act 100% free of problems, specially with wifi drivers and some sound cards. It still a pain in the ass in Ubuntu 10.10.

Is there really that many sound card and wifi problems still? I haven't run into that since early 2007. Since then each version of Ubuntu has become easier and easier to setup. 10.04 fully supports my Spring 2005 laptop that I gave to my dad to use out of the box. Only had to do the normal codecs and maybe had to enable the restricted intel graphics driver, though that I'm not certain of. My 2007 Asus worked out of the box at version 7.10(or whatever it was), though it didn't work at all before that due to being one of the very first laptops with a lot of it's hardware. Funny enough I remember having to find more drivers in Vista then Ubuntu with it.

Let me tell you this first... people go to Linux and get frustrated very quickly because it is not easy like windows.

Its a whole new OS so be patient with problems and there is a lot of learning to do. All the best.

I wouldn't say it's not easy like windows. For the vast majority of users it's just as easy as windows if not maybe a little tiny bit more difficult for some hardware. My dad, though learning pretty fast, has had a better experience with Ubuntu with it's straight-forward app menu system that he really likes, and it's software center which admittedly could be a lot better.

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Flawed

Is there really that many sound card and wifi problems still?

I haven't seen one for a long time, and even then, ndiswrapper was a simple solution (wifi at least). In terms of sound cards/chips, I've never encountered one that didn't work out of the box. I think such claims today are wildly anachronistic. GNU/Linux hardware support is vastly superior to what it was just a few short years ago.

This is exactly what is stopping me from going totally Linux. The lack music software that I used in Windows [sony Acid Pro] is the no.1 stumbling block. I love Linux Mint's Ubuntu distro.

I think the less proprietary software we see on Linux the better in my opinion.

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PsYcHoKiLLa

To the OP:

If you like the apple look then give Macbuntu a try, Have a look at it below :

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soldier1st

Windows does have the chkdsk utility which can be run manually from the cli. Of course that only checks the area of the disk where the windows partition is. Bad sectors are usually an indicator of a failing drive. Although some disks can continue function fine with a small number of bad sectors. Most file systems record this information in their journals, and then ring-fence them off from the rest of the partition.

Which games? A lot of popular games run very well in wine.

Sounds like a video driver issue. What chip/card do you have; lspci | grep VGA

Flash has always been quite ugly. Even on a speedy system, you can get video tearing, poor performance etc. However in this case it's quite possible that it's the graphics chip compatibility. What driver are you using? proprietary or open source? If you want to watch youtube videos, I suggest using the default Totem Movie Player, which can be found in the Applications->Sound and Video menu. It has a side bar where you can search for and watch videos from youtube without using flash. That should help for now.

Audio skipping again could be due to software rendering instead of accelerated rendering: glxinfo | grep rendering.

It sounds to me like the problems you are having are due to hardware compatibility mostly. Try running those commands I gave you, then either message me the results or post them here.

the games i primarily play are star trek based and i have tried to get wine to work with em but can't and direct rendering is what i got and my hardware is shown in my sig and i am aware of chkdsk but when the drive i had windows did not report a failure or any warning but i did hear a clicking sound so at that time i was shocked that i was not warned so i had no advance warning that the drive was about to die and if i had some warning then i would have saved the data to another drive and the hardware is compatible with linux mint and ubuntu and i am using the latest proprietary driver. but when i can i am gonna overhaul the whole thing and have something way newer. also i tried it with totem but it froze up.

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Flawed

I've been using linux for almost 10 years now, granted not the bloated

Because it comes with standard software most people use it's bloated? I fail to see your logic. I guess you're used to windows where you get nothing with the system except notepad, MS paint, and minesweeper?

everything installed from the start distros people flock to now

Have you even looked what the default Ubuntu has preinstalled? It's the same kind standard FOSS software that 95% of distros come preinstalled with. You know the kind of stuff you would install after a Gentoo tool chain compile installation procedure.

but still linux and i have yet to use it full time. Actually for the last 2 years i've just booted into it once a week typed emerge --sync, emerge -av world and jumped back into win7 but good luck to you.

Then why bother using Gentoo at all? Windows 7 and Gentoo couldn't be at more opposite ends of the spectrum. One is a dumbed down, bumbling proprietary mess, and the other is a source based do-it-yourself system. And it's funny you mention those package manager commands. I mean don't you then miss the elegance of updating your entire system emerge, Windows is so chaotic, with each application having its own update system if at all, no unified interface, no simple yet powerful way to search for, install, uninstall, or inspect what packages are on the system? I guess from the sound of your limited usage of Linux though that you fully understand its potential, for if you did, the last OS you would be using now would be windows.

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Flawed

the games i primarily play are star trek based and i have tried to get wine to work with em

Startrek Legacy 1.2 gets a platinum rating in wine, that means it works out of the box flawlessly. I played it a while ago and it has very nice graphics and game play :)

and i am aware of chkdsk but when the drive i had windows did not report a failure or any warning

Unfortunately Windows is less error tolerant. I remember fixing a system whose ram was faulty that windows just blue screened all the time at, but in linux the worst I got was a few segmentation faults in apps running. The Linux journalling file systems by the same measure are much more reliable than NTFS. In addition file systems are checked after a certain number of mounts, something that doesn't happen in windows, although that's probably because chkdsk is very slow at testing NTFS partitions, whereas ext4 is lightning fast.

but i did hear a clicking sound so at that time i was shocked that i was not warned so i had no advance warning that the drive was about to die and if i had some warning then i would have saved the data to another drive

To be fair, I would suggest backing up critical data no matter what OS you use. It's far more convenient in Ubuntu though because you get 2gigs of Ubuntu One cloud space integrated into Gnome.

and the hardware is compatible with linux mint and ubuntu and i am using the latest proprietary driver. but when i can i am gonna overhaul the whole thing and have something way newer. also i tried it with totem but it froze up.

That's strange because the system I'm typing this on has worse specs than yours. Your system should run flash, videos, and games very easily. I only have a 8600GTS on this machine and it runs compiz etc great. Are you using 32 or 64 bit OS versions? the 2.9 GB of available ram is probably down to using an x86 version (32bit). You could try the 64bit one.

In terms of performance, did you activate the nvidia proprietary driver in System->Administration->Additional Drivers? It will tell you if it's activated when you select the driver in the list.

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Growled

And while Ubuntu itself has progressed quite nicely I still feel that the software available for it is subpar.

I agree. Subpar software is probably one of the major things that is hindering Linux right now.

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bjoswald

Well, isn't that the whole point why people get frustrated with Linux? The thing I loved about switching from Windows to Mac OS X was that it didn't require that much learning at all. And while Ubuntu itself has progressed quite nicely I still feel that the software available for it is subpar.

Unfortunately, that's what you get when you move to Linux. Since there's no money to be made, most people do it in their free time and throw it out on the Internet for others to play with. Eventually, someone else might come along, take a look at it, and tweak/fix it.

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.Neo

You see the same happing with Android really. Again, the OS itself is pretty decent, but the apps running on it are far below the quality of what you're used to on iOS.

I don't think this will change anytime soon.

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+stereopixels

I agree. Subpar software is probably one of the major things that is hindering Linux right now.

It is unfortunately the way open source works; with Windows and OS X you get commercial (paid) software packages and comprehensive interface guidelines (Apple are very hot on the latter), so there's money to be made and that money can be pumped into paying for proper interface design. With FOSS, the UI isn't usually the primary concern... that's not a negative about how the software itself works, often the source code is excellently written, solid, stable and follows programming concepts to the book, but the way we are left to interact with that software often leaves a lot to be desired, and without interface guidelines, every piece of software has a completely unique look.

<Snipped>

Edited by Anaron
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soldier1st

Startrek Legacy 1.2 gets a platinum rating in wine, that means it works out of the box flawlessly. I played it a while ago and it has very nice graphics and game play :)

Unfortunately Windows is less error tolerant. I remember fixing a system whose ram was faulty that windows just blue screened all the time at, but in linux the worst I got was a few segmentation faults in apps running. The Linux journalling file systems by the same measure are much more reliable than NTFS. In addition file systems are checked after a certain number of mounts, something that doesn't happen in windows, although that's probably because chkdsk is very slow at testing NTFS partitions, whereas ext4 is lightning fast.

To be fair, I would suggest backing up critical data no matter what OS you use. It's far more convenient in Ubuntu though because you get 2gigs of Ubuntu One cloud space integrated into Gnome.

That's strange because the system I'm typing this on has worse specs than yours. Your system should run flash, videos, and games very easily. I only have a 8600GTS on this machine and it runs compiz etc great. Are you using 32 or 64 bit OS versions? the 2.9 GB of available ram is probably down to using an x86 version (32bit). You could try the 64bit one.

In terms of performance, did you activate the nvidia proprietary driver in System->Administration->Additional Drivers? It will tell you if it's activated when you select the driver in the list.

i'm running 32bit Linux Mint as i had 10.04.1 before then upgraded to 10.10 which was problamatic from day 1 but stuck with it and still have issues with compiz, even 10.04.1 had video issues and both had the proprietary driver enabled and on firefox some images are garbled but on opera and chrome they are all fine and that happened even on ubuntu 10.04.1 though my hardware is very old but i agree that i should not have these issues but could it be that my video card has dvi on it? i even tried all suggestions but still no fix. also the 2.9GB out of 4GB is possible because of bios settings that are changed but with same settings in Windows only 2GB is seen though for me 2GB is not enough for what i do. my new system will have like 4-8GB ram min as that will be enough and it will be linux only instead of dual booting with windows.

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simonlang

good luck with it then. its been nearly a year for me now since i went from win7 to linux (ubuntu first, then tried out several others, now im back to ubuntu). i havent regret that move at all. you can do anything with linux you can do with windows (i dont count in gaming as i have my xbox for gaming). plus you definitely learn more about computers and your system (im just happy i started using computers with windows 95 and not vista or win7 otherwise i would still be a noob lol).

also ubuntu has a great community which helps a lot in problem solving.

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fix-this!

off topic but where is mark jensen? i haven't seen him on here in ages! :blink:

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Quattrone

off topic but where is mark jensen? i haven't seen him on here in ages! :blink:

Good point, i miss him a lot... i hope he didnt quit this site.

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Samurizer

Don't really get the point of declaring that you're switching, to be honest. Or why you're even doing it at all.

If it's for cost issues, I can understand that. Otherwise it just seems pointless. Sure, you can do everything you need in Ubuntu, except that the same is true for Windows as well, and Windows is often less buggy, more polished, and come with more quality apps that don't force you to make as many compromises.

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Flawed

Don't really get the point of declaring that you're switching, to be honest. Or why you're even doing it at all.

To let others know? Perhaps to clarify any outstanding concerns? There are many reasons.

If it's for cost issues, I can understand that. Otherwise it just seems pointless.

People don't always switch for financial reasons, although that can be a factor. They often switch because of peace of mind in terms of security, that is, to no longer worry about the virus infested ecosystem of Windows, where your bank details and passwords can be stolen via keyloggers, or instability caused by rootkits, malware, and that ilk. It's also nice not having to bog down the system with superfluous Firewall or Anti-Virus software, it's surprising how many resources those programs consume.

Another thing that people like is the continuity, in terms of user interface, and application integration, in terms of a centralised application store, something Windows doesn't have, and something that OS X has only just added.

Sure, you can do everything you need in Ubuntu, except that the same is true for Windows as well

Yes, if you can find it, then pay for it. Finding the right applications you want in Windows is tiresome. There's no integrated application you can use to find, install, and update all the apps on your system from. Windows applications, and the installation system (if you can call it a system) it uses is outdated, error prone, and generally chaotic, with each application having its own update system and installation/uninstallation procedure. There's no uniformity in window whatsoever, it's all adhoc.

and Windows is often less buggy

Every OS has bugs. The difference is, in Linux we get updates and fixes much faster.

and come with more quality apps that don't force you to make as many compromises.

I don't agree with that statement I'm sorry. There are varying degrees of quality in apps across all platforms. In addition quality is a loaded term, for what criterion does quality denote?

Aesthetics? Functionality? Configurability? Extensibility? Stability? Easy of use?

And what species of compromise do you refer to?

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Growled
It's also nice not having to bog down the system with superfluous Firewall or Anti-Virus software, it's surprising how many resources those programs consume.

It's also amazing how much bandwidth those programs take. I am on limited bandwidth at home and every little amount saved helps.

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Samurizer

They often switch because of peace of mind in terms of security, that is, to no longer worry about the virus infested ecosystem of Windows, where your bank details and passwords can be stolen via keyloggers, or instability caused by rootkits, malware, and that ilk. It's also nice not having to bog down the system with superfluous Firewall or Anti-Virus software, it's surprising how many resources those programs consume.

The only thing you've got right above is that extra firewall and antivirus software are superfluous. I've went for almost a decade without them. Never been infected.

Yes, if you can find it, then pay for it. Finding the right applications you want in Windows is tiresome. There's no integrated application you can use to find, install, and update all the apps on your system from. Windows applications, and the installation system (if you can call it a system) it uses is outdated, error prone, and generally chaotic, with each application having its own update system and installation/uninstallation procedure. There's no uniformity in window whatsoever, it's all adhoc.

Paying for well-polished apps is always an option. If not, quality Windows freeware is more than abundant, which any semi-competent Windows/Linux user commenting on this issue should be aware of. If you're really happy with the generally inferior set of programs that come bundled with Linux, the fact is that many of them have Windows ports as well.

As for the Windows update system, there's a lot of great things about it, actually. It doesn't break packages, one package's update source can't interfere with another's, you don't have to hunt everywhere for PPAs and have to choose between different versions of each, and most important of all: it actually works, and doesn't leave your system weeks or months out of date even though the updater tells you that you're "completely updated".

Every OS has bugs. The difference is, in Linux we get updates and fixes much faster.

Really? It's been almost a year now as far as wireless problems (RALink RT3090) on my netbook are concerned. With Lucid, need to recompile and upgrade kernel just to get wireless working. In Maverick, can't shut down without manually turning the wireless switch off first unless I want Ubuntu to hang, and let's not even talk about the Unity bugs. On my laptop, GRUB literally takes more than 10 seconds to appear after BIOS is done, the Ibus icon refuses to go away even though I've checked the option to not show it in the system tray, Compiz is a piece of crap that guzzles ~30% CPU (Mobility Radeon HD 4225), a mysterious process called "python" appears from time to time consuming 100% of one of my cores and pushing CPU temp into the low 70s for no apparent reason, and GNOME is in perpetual danger of getting choked to death and crashing simply by playing an AVI file. Any idea how much longer I'll have to wait for my quick fixes?

I don't agree with that statement I'm sorry. There are varying degrees of quality in apps across all platforms. In addition quality is a loaded term, for what criterion does quality denote?

Aesthetics? Functionality? Configurability? Extensibility? Stability? Easy of use?

All of the above. Firefox (especially the betas) works and looks better in Windows. So do Opera and Chrome, where you can get tabs in the title bar without resorting to horrendously ugly themes. Skype for Windows has more features and options than Skype for Linux. There's no messaging client in Linux that can handle video/audio chat for WLM. Windows Live Mail and/or Outlook beats Thunderbird/Evolution any day, and MS Office vs OpenOffice isn't even a contest at all. Games work better in Windows without suffering from inferior graphics and/or performance, assuming your funky Wine hacks can run them at all. Video drivers are better in Windows. The latest and greatest software developments are generally always available on Windows (or Mac) first, with Linux ports coming a considerable amount of time later.

Have you tried to sync Apple mobile devices using Ubuntu? It's an absolute disaster. That's probably not Ubuntu's fault, but it's still a terrible user experience.

I can go on and on, but I've probably made my point already. Sorry if I sounded like I was taking a crap on Linux this post, but hey, you asked.

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