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[IPv4] That's it folks....!


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Frylock86

Just posted moments ago via the IANA: "#IPv4: 102, 103, 104, 179 and 185 have been allocated. No unicast IPv4 /8s remain unallocated."

I'm heading out with my family to the bunker now. I wish everyone the best of luck, and hope to see you all back here in a few years when all is safe. Godspeed. :laugh:

Castle_Romeo.jpg

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KiHu

Wicked!

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+John.

Just to ease your mind, it's not as bad as it looks. The figure means that all the ISPs essentially can't take any more. The companies themselves still have hundreds of thousands to allocate, so it won't really run our for a while. Hopefully by then we'll have seen a decent enough switchover ratio to IPv6 for it to not cause too much hassle

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episode

Just to ease your mind, it's not as bad as it looks. The figure means that all the ISPs essentially can't take any more. The companies themselves still have hundreds of thousands to allocate, so it won't really run our for a while. Hopefully by then we'll have seen a decent enough switchover ratio to IPv6 for it to not cause too much hassle

Not only that, but the next logical step is to take back some of the addresses from universities that don't use/need them.

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Frylock86

Not only that, but the next logical step is to take back some of the addresses from universities that don't use/need them.

If any other universities IT staff are like mine, they'll be on IPv4 for another 10 years :/

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Soulsiphon

If any other universities IT staff are like mine, they'll be on IPv4 for another 10 years :/

No they won't :) It's all good though, I've already staked out ::1

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HawkMan

I wish people would use proper thread titles.

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Frylock86

I wish people would use proper thread titles.

Sorry.... :/

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episode

If any other universities IT staff are like mine, they'll be on IPv4 for another 10 years :/

Thats not what I'm talking about.

For example, in 2000 Stanford gave back their Class A block because they didn't need it. No one needs an entire A block. That was 16 million addresses back into the system. If the other big owners would do the same, we'd be fine for quite a while.

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Frylock86

Thats not what I'm talking about.

For example, in 2000 Stanford gave back their Class A block because they didn't need it. No one needs an entire A block. That was 16 million addresses back into the system. If the other big owners would do the same, we'd be fine for quite a while.

True, but at the same time, I'm sure people stocked up so that they can rest easy for a while.

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tsutton

My ISP has said they have 6,000 IPv4 left over so they can still add more broadband users for now. But I have heard other ISPs not accepting anymore customers cos they've run out of IP address and they doesn't even have IPv6 set up yet!

So choose carefully whe you switch broadband providers...

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Frylock86

My ISP has said they have 6,000 IPv4 left over so they can still add more broadband users for now. But I have heard other ISPs not accepting anymore customers cos they've run out of IP address and they doesn't even have IPv6 set up yet!

So choose carefully whe you switch broadband providers...

Is this in the States? Which ISPs?

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sc302

Here is a thought...switch all phones and other devices that have a dedicated ipv4 (that don't need a ipv4 address, are you going to port ftp to the phone or host games off the phone? lets be real here) and either use another nat'd based system to go and hit the world or switch them over to ipv6. That would save millions of IP's right there without asking anyone to hand over their subnets, and to the phone end user they can still browse the interweb.

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neufuse

how about we take back then entire /8 blocks form people like Apple..... in one block alone apple has 16 million addresses..... do they really need 16 million?

Where did all the IP numbers go? The US Department of Defense has them

Posted in Main on February 13th, 2008 by Pingdom

There have been voices raised that we are running out of IPv4 addresses for some time now. So who has taken them? After discussing this at a coffee break here at Pingdom, we were curious. Are there are any “big spenders” who have allocated a huge share of the IP space for themselves? Yes there are.

When looking at the assigned IP blocks at IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority), what becomes immediately clear is that the US Department of Defense has a significant number of large IP blocks. We only looked at /8 IP blocks, the largest blocks you can get, and there are 12 of them assigned to the US DoD and related organizations. Each /8 block holds 16,777,214 IP addresses, so the DoD have in effect allocated more than 200 million IP addresses. That should hold them for a while.

The closest any other corporation comes to this are Level 3 Communications and Hewlett-Packard, with two /8 blocks each. The DoD-owned IP blocks together with the 26 corporations and universities who have their own /8 blocks hold more than 671 million IP addresses.

These were all early land grabs, most of them made between 1991 and 1995.

Some notables among the companies with one /8 IP block are Apple (but no Microsoft in sight), IBM, Halliburton and the Ford Motor Company.

Companies and organizations with IPv4 /8 blocks from IANA Owner Blocks ~IP addresses

US Military (Department of Defense etc.) 12 201 million

Level 3 Communications, Inc. 2 33 million

Hewlett-Packard 2 33 million

AT&T Bell Laboratories (Alcatel-Lucent) 1 16 million

AT&T Global Network Services 1 16 million

Bell-Northern Research (Nortel Networks) 1 16 million

Amateur Radio Digital Communications 1 16 million

Apple Computer Inc. 1 16 million

Cap Debis CCS (Mercedes-Benz) 1 16 million

Computer Sciences Corporation 1 16 million

Deparment of Social Security of UK 1 16 million

E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. 1 16 million

Eli Lily and Company 1 16 million

Ford Motor Company 1 16 million

General Electric Company 1 16 million

Halliburton Company 1 16 million

IBM 1 16 million

Interop Show Network 1 16 million

Merck and Co., Inc. 1 16 million

MERIT Computer Network 1 16 million

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 16 million

Performance Systems International (Cogent) 1 16 million

Prudential Equity Group, LLC 1 16 million

Société Internationale De Telecommunications Aeronautiques 1 16 million

U.S. Postal Service 1 16 million

UK Ministry of Defence 1 16 million

Xerox Corporation 1 16 million

40 671 million

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Frylock86

That's a lot of addresses. I would have thought cell companies were the ones stocking up...

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neufuse

That's a lot of addresses. I would have thought cell companies were the ones stocking up...

most of those companies that have /8 ranges bought them when the internet was nothing and IP's where easily bought in large blocks

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Teebor

I want photos of the first post apocalypse IPv4 mutant

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The_Decryptor

Welp, we had a good run, but all good things must come to an end.

See you on the other side!

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MarkusDarkus

Now let's see what happens to the value of IP addresses

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DrCheese
Not only that, but the next logical step is to take back some of the addresses from universities that don't use/need them.
how about we take back then entire /8 blocks form people like Apple..... in one block alone apple has 16 million addresses..... do they really need 16 million?

It's a giant waste of time and would only postpone the problem for a few months at most. You can bet a lot of those companies wouldn't want to give them back either (Why should they? There's no contractual obligation to and they'd rather sell them if it's worth that much) and would waste months/money in court.

The ONLY solution is ipv6, everything else is a giant waste of time or will introduce more problems than it will solve (ISP NAT)

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Frylock86

It's a giant waste of time and would only postpone the problem for a few months at most. You can bet a lot of those companies wouldn't want to give them back either (Why should they? There's no contractual obligation to and they'd rather sell them if it's worth that much) and would waste months/money in court.

The ONLY solution is ipv6, everything else is a giant waste of time or will introduce more problems than it will solve (ISP NAT)

My thoughts exactly. One way or another, IPv4 is history.

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sc302

My thoughts exactly. One way or another, IPv4 is history.

Not as of right now. Let see how long it is going to take for the internet to go to ipv6, especially with everyone saying that they have no money....place your bets, I think 10+ years (little to no implementation yet, financial costs are high to switch, most technology in place today will not support it, and in current businesses eyes their businesses are functioning). It has to be a push from the outside to force them into the next generation, without this push it isn't happening anytime soon. If the US government didn't push cable providers to go with digital, analog cable would still be around today.

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neufuse

Not as of right now. Let see how long it is going to take for the internet to go to ipv6, especially with everyone saying that they have no money....place your bets, I think 10+ years (little to no implementation yet, financial costs are high to switch, most technology in place today will not support it, and in current businesses eyes their businesses are functioning). It has to be a push from the outside to force them into the next generation, without this push it isn't happening anytime soon. If the US government didn't push cable providers to go with digital, analog cable would still be around today.

When did the gov push cable to go digital? They pushed OTA to go digital, but there was never a deadline or anything for cable to be all digital... heck cable started going digital a very long time ago because they saw you could fit 12 channels into 1 NTSC channel in SD format.... more things in the same space plus internet was the big push

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sc302

From http://www.dtv.gov/consumercorner.html

What Are the Laws Regarding DTV?

In 1996, Congress authorized the distribution of an additional broadcast channel to each broadcast TV station so that they could use it for digital broadcasting while simultaneously continuing their analog broadcast channel.

Later, Congress mandated June 12, 2009 (extended from February 17, 2009) as the last day for full-power television stations in the U.S. to broadcast in analog. Before June 12, 2009, broadcast stations in all U.S. markets were transmitting in both analog and digital. Since June 13, 2009, all full-power U.S. TV stations have been transmitting in digital only.

So in your home, you will not find a analog box anywhere or a analog tv that will function without a digital converter box. Without this push, they would still be stations in analog that you could get without a digital converter and cable would still be a hybrid system (digital and analog).

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