[7 x64] What Brings You To x64 Land?


Recommended Posts

PGHammer

The reasons why people crossgrade/upgrade to a new OS are almost as varied as people themselves. Going to x64, however, mostly requires conscious thought (or did, before 7 came along).

So, here comes the 64-peso (Mexican currency - however, I am not Mexican or even Hispanic) question - why (and when) did you in particular move to x64?

I'll even lead off.

I switched prior to 7; back before Vista SP1, in fact. The reason was *not* large amounts of RAM (I had but 2 GB then, and have only 3 GB today), but stability, especially under heavy CPU load.

Given that I was, both then, and now, pushing the multi-process limits of budget hardware (really, starting with XP, everyone multitasks and/or runs multiple processes; what separates the heavy users from the light ones is how many tasks/processes are running at once and their *weight*), I needed an OS that could not only stand that sort of stress, but not force me to toss my existing applications, or break my wallet upgrading the hardware. The x64 iteration of Vista (I was running Vista Ultimate x32) fit the bill - greater stability under load, could take my existing apps, and let me keep *all* my hardware. (What hardware I've shelved since then was not due to compatibility issues.)

Then - and now - stability FTW!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Vice

Back in 2006 I went with a 64-bit operating system because I had 8GB of memory. Simple as that really.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Jen Smith

Well, for me anyways the desktop machines that are running x64 are because of memory limits. Just not going to smush 8-16GB into Win7 x86. That's pretty much it; I don't have any software that actually requires it, and I've not really noticed any differences in performance between the two.. pretty much a plus or minus depending on the application, nothing stands out either way, be it apps or games. I still have a bunch of x86 systems that only have 2-4GB, some of which even have x64 capable processors, just haven't had the need/desire to re-do them. Stability (again, for me) has never been an issue; both flavors of Win7 have been rock solid. Last time I had a blue screen was back in XP land, and chances are that was just a faulty driver.

As far as servers go, the ones I run that are Windows based are all running 2008R2. So it's either x64, or go back to 2003 or 2008. (No thanks, I really like R2.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Colin-uk

Because I can, really.

I didnt use any 64 bit os before windows 7.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jimmy0

3 years ago when I built this PC I wanted 4GB of RAM, so 64bit OS was the only option.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The_Decryptor

I had a 64bit capable machine. Now my machine has 8GB of RAM so it's a necessity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Reacon

To be honest, when I chose Windows Vista x64, I just wanted to be with the times. Later did I realize that my 6 gigs of ram wouldn't have been usable if I went otherwise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Phouchg

8 GB of RAM and that's it. It's a shame that there's still not much of x64 software available...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
tsupersonic

>4GB of RAM.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Zlip792

I built recently (like three days), my second PC and first x64 capable PC, to get full 4 GB utilization, I went with 7 64-bit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+InsaneNutter

Why not if all your hardware supports it? I've used 64bit Windows since Vista was in beta.

The only time I have ever noticed a difference is with the Gamecube / Wii Emulator Dolphin, the 64bit version used to perform a lot better than the 32bit version.

Link to post
Share on other sites
x-byte

Vista x64 in 2007. Most because of performance and drivers maturing. Been using x64 ever since and is very pleased.

Link to post
Share on other sites
soldier1st

i have no use for x64 as i don't have more than 4GB memory and everything works under x86, but when i do then x64 could prove useful.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Seizure1990

I installed a 64-bit OS because I have a 64-bit CPU. Simple as that. I only have 2GB of RAM currently.

I originally had Windows XP Pro x64, and then switched to Windows 7 Pro x64.

Link to post
Share on other sites
neo158

Because I can and that's good enough :p

I wanted the extra stability and need the RAM, 4GB ATM which will be 8GB tomorrow when the RAM arrives, that x64 OSs support for my games design course at uni. I use my rig for Hi-Poly 3D Modelling and HD Video Editing.

As for when I made the switch, I tried Vista x64 and had some minor issues so went back to 32-bit but switched to x64 full time with 7 x64 and haven't looked back since.

Link to post
Share on other sites
brink668

Because I use lots of virtual machines for testing purposes good use for 8GB of ram. Additionally, I can have a lot of applications running good for when I am doing website work and stuff. x64 is required to be able to use more ram than 3.5GB so it's a given and well worth it. Keeps everything operating smoothly

Link to post
Share on other sites
cacoe

Because I have 4GB of RAM.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bjoswald

So my machine can recognize all 4 GB of RAM. Other than that, it runs the same as 32-bit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Seizure1990

Is there any REAL reason to install the x32 version of Windows 7 on an x64 PC?

I specify Windows 7, because while I've observed that Windows 7 handles low-memory situations quite nicely (even the x64 one), Vista does NOT. And the x64 version makes the performance issues even worse.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wrack

8 GB RAM :)

Windows 7 x64 Ultimate

Visual Studio 2010

SQL Server 2008 R2 x64

Basically for me it is a development requirement as the client uses x64 configuration.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chasethebase

My laptop came with 64-bit Vista and a free upgrade to 64-bit 7.

Yeah.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

I have 4GB of RAM, so I needed it so I didn't lose out on the extra. That and lets face it, 32-bit is so 2005.

Link to post
Share on other sites
PGHammer

i have no use for x64 as i don't have more than 4GB memory and everything works under x86, but when i do then x64 could prove useful.

Soldier1st, check out the post I led the thread off with and the post immediately under yours - neither of us have 4 GB of RAM. (I crossgraded from Vista x32 to Vista x64 with half that - 2 GB - and only have 3 GB today.)

While greater than 4 GB is a major driver for x64, it is not the only one.

In fact, if you're a gamer or other multitasker (medium to heavy), you have even greater reason than most to move to x64 (stability).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jen Smith
Visual Studio 2010

Heh that right there would want me using 8GB+, even if not building against x64. Between VS2010, a large project, CodeRush, Refactor Pro, TFS, and a few minor addons.. that thing eats memory like there's no tomorrow. Love the IDE, but slim it ain't. VS2010 under 4GB can be painful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.