Microsoft is updating the privacy settings on Xbox, no longer collecting voice data

Microsoft has announced that it's building on the commitment shared in April of last year by updating the privacy settings for Xbox users. As it promised at the time, the updates aim to give users more control and provide more transparency regarding the types of data it collects.

In the coming weeks, when users first sign into their consoles, they'll see an overview of the data required diagnostic data that Microsoft collects. This message will also show up on Xbox Series S and X consoles when they launch on November 10.

The required diagnostic data includes error details that prevent games and apps running, errors with the console setup, and errors related to software updates. Naturally, this data is required so Microsoft can keep things working as you'd expect them to. The new message will let users learn more about the data being collected, though you'll be forced to accept it if you want to use the console.

One thing that's changed is that Microsoft is no longer collecting data from voice searches or speech-to-text conversions. According to the company, it collects data with the goal of supporting "positive player experiences" on the console, and it has concluded that this data isn't necessary for that purpose.

In addition to the required data, users will also be given the option to share optional diagnostic data, which includes actions you take while using the console, performance data, and enhanced error reporting with more details on the conditions that cause crashes or errors. Like with required data, you can learn more about what's being collected, and in this case, you can choose not to share said data. You can also change this setting after the fact in the console's settings.

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