Ofcom makes it easier to opt out of unsolicited phone calls

Unsolicited phone calls have been the bane of phone service subscribers for decades. While many individuals have captured the various ways they have dealt with such calls over the years, an increasing number of countries have introduced 'do not call' registers to help combat the problem from a legal standpoint.

Back in 2007, Canada announced plans for a National Do Not Call List which was subsequently launched the following year. Other countries, including Australia, the US and India have all created similar lists since the turn of the century. Seemingly, the longest operating register belongs to the United Kingdom, having been established in 1999. The register, known as the 'Telephone Preference Service (TPS)', is currently regulated by Ofcom.

Traditionally, you've either had to make a phone call to TPS to register your phone number or visit the TPS website but now there is a new method which makes adding your mobile number a snap.

All you need to do is text 'TPS' along with your e-mail address to 78070. Once received, you should receive a text message in return confirming the registration of your mobile number.

Unfortunately, TPS registration via text message will not prevent you from receiving unsolicited or spam text messages. However, you can continue to forward any such texts to 7726 for investigation by the Information Commissioner's Office.

Irrespective of the registration method, you should not expect an immediate stop to sales and marketing phone calls. The TPS has noted in general that "you should start noticing a gradual decline from registration" over the following four weeks until the legal requirement not to call the registered number comes into effect. Otherwise, you can always use a smartphone app such as Truecaller to help you manage calls and text messages from unknown parties.

Source: Ofcom via Mobile Choice UK

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