'1234' is most common iOS passcode, according to app developer

Some data collected anonymously from users of an iOS application freely available on the App Store suggests that a good amount of people don't bother picking secure passcodes for their mobile devices. The most common passcode was, not surprisingly, 1234.

The next four common passcodes are just as uncreative: the bottommost button four times (0000), down the middle row of buttons (2580), the top left button four times (1111), and the middle button four times (5555).

This data was collected by Daniel Amatay, an iOS developer, who published the findings on his blog (via TheNextWeb). Amatay collected the data via his application, Big Brother Camera Security, which photographs people trying to guess the user's passcode via a fake iOS lock screen. In the most recent update to his application, he added in anonymous tracking of what passcodes are actually used by users. One may assume that users would generally use the same passcode as the real iOS passcode - which has to be disabled for this application to function correctly (a demonstration is available here).

Another interesting tidbit gathered from the data was the potential use of one's birthyear as the passcode. The below graph suggests a good chunk of iOS users are born between 1990 and 1999, with the 1980 to 1989 group coming right behind. This is assuming that there is not an alarming amount of children under 11 years old running around with iPhones or iPod touches with free reign to access the App Store.

This data stresses the importance of picking a secure combination of numbers as passcodes - or barring that, a password. Then again, passwords are not much of an improvement if people are mashing in 'qwerty' or '123456' as their passwords.

Image Credit: Amitay.us

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft files trademark for Kinect-like ad tech

Next Story

Video game sales in US down 14 percent in May

40 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

It looks like there are many 12 and 13 year old kids with an iPhone. Assuming the reason people use 1998 as password, because it's their year of birth

nobody care how does he stole those passwords? is that means any app can stole all your datas? ****ed me off

Gutierrez said,
wait, wait a minute. They are collecting passwords? I wonldnt surprise

That's what I was wondering. But then I read the article and found out why.

Gutierrez said,
wait, wait a minute. They are collecting passwords? I wonldnt surprise

Please read first. Besides, its just the lockscreen, who cares.

Gutierrez said,
wait, wait a minute. They are collecting passwords? I wonldnt surprise

As above, it's just the lock screen. Without your phone they aren't going to be able to do much with it, except create pretty graphs!

Heh, the more things change...I found a recent Palm device (Palm T/X with wi-fi and Bluetooth) at a local thrift store. The previous owner had a password on it, but it wasn't too hard to find out what it was.

I hit the "hint" button and he had used the password (1234) as his "hint". Judging from all the stuff he left on there, he was apparently a doctor.

Relic1980 said,
Heh, the more things change...I found a recent Palm device (Palm T/X with wi-fi and Bluetooth) at a local thrift store. The previous owner had a password on it, but it wasn't too hard to find out what it was.

I hit the "hint" button and he had used the password (1234) as his "hint". Judging from all the stuff he left on there, he was apparently a doctor.

Crazy; Really shouldn't leave such sensitive info (what I imagine to be sensitive - maybe it wasn't) so easily accessible like that.
I know where I work we have to keep our phones etc. on lock down (anything that can have access to work emails etc.)
Not really a problem though as the laptops they supply us have built in fingerprint readers, as does my phone conveniently.

Soulsiphon said,
Aw jeez now my passwords are all over the interwebz. I'm thinking '4321' next whatya all think?

Sorry you can't, I have already called dibs on "4321" to be my new master password.

yeh but with most smartphones we can track them.. so this only matters either from a GF point of view.. or MI5 and secret service

Max Norris said,
Remind me to change the combination on my luggage.

You need to change the combination on your luggage!!!

that's why mine is 4321 Seriosly how is this a valid input of what people would try to unlock a device? of course I would try 1234 1111 2222 3333 4444 if I was given a device and told "try to unlock it "

Draconian Guppy said,
that's why mine is 4321 Seriosly how is this a valid input of what people would try to unlock a device? of course I would try 1234 1111 2222 3333 4444 if I was given a device and told "try to unlock it "

Aye, that is your initial instinct, but it is most likely wrong.
Assuming of course the one who says "try to unlock it" is the owner/person who set the passcode. Think about it, if I, Remus, ask you, Guppy, to attempt unlock my android by inputting a four digit combo, I, Remus, will have made it difficult for you, Guppy, to unlock. Thus my passcode is not one of the passcodes you would initially assume... Muahahaha

... But this is just the start of my evil plan, after convincing you it most definitely is none of the above I will then change it to "1234"... you will NEVER guess it, as why would it be so simple... I, Remus, have defeated you, Guppy.

Draconian Guppy said,
that's why mine is 4321 Seriosly how is this a valid input of what people would try to unlock a device? of course I would try 1234 1111 2222 3333 4444 if I was given a device and told "try to unlock it "
"In the most recent update to his application, he added in anonymous tracking of what passcodes are actually used by users."

roadwarrior said,
And I'm sure the results would be the same on pretty much any platform out there.
It depends upon how much max character you can enter. By the most common pass is 12345

Del-Funky Smelly Be. said,
It depends upon how much max character you can enter. By the most common pass is 12345

I've got the same combination on my luggage!