$35 Raspberry Pi PC hacked to stream AirPlay video

A few days ago, we posted word that the developers of the ultra-cheap Raspberry Pi PC have begun production of the $35 model. While the company has yet to announce a launch date for the PC, or its even cheaper $25 brother, it looks like the developers of the PC are having a little bit of fun while we wait for the final launch.

In a post this week on the Raspberry Pi web site, the team showed off a video where the PC was hooked up, via the HDMI port, to a regular television. The developer created a hack that allowed for Apple's AirPlay wireless connection to link up the Raspberry Pi PC to an iPad that's running the YouTube app.

The final result is that the Raspberry Pi PC got to stream a YouTube video featuring dancing cows on a TV via the iPad Airplay hack.

There are no details given on how this hack was created and there's no word on why the Raspberry Pi team would create such a hack other than to simply have a good time. Hopefully we will get to see the actual PC go on sale in the very near futures.

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11 Comments

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"and there's no word on why the Raspberry Pi team would create such a hack other than to simply have a good time."

It's fairly obvious, isn't it?
That's SUCH an obvious poke at Apple TV, many people buy it just for AirPlay.

GS:mac

They sold all the pre-production boards - I highly doubt that this is the official raspberry pi team themselves, just someone that bought a board on ebay.

I am not really that knowledgeable about tech stuff, but could someone use this to build a low budget, yet, high end blu ray player?

Lamp0 said,
I am not really that knowledgeable about tech stuff, but could someone use this to build a low budget, yet, high end blu ray player?

Possibly, but it mainly depends on finding a good quality low budget external blu-ray drive.

Lamp0 said,
I am not really that knowledgeable about tech stuff, but could someone use this to build a low budget, yet, high end blu ray player?


Quite possibly no, it would depend if the dedicated processor for video can support Bluray formats, then there is the actual problem of DRM and if it can run on it.

Why is this called a hack? Isn't a hack a modification of the original software by third parties to do something that is different than the original developer's intent? Considering this is made by the device's devs, this ain't really a hack....

It's like saying Windows Live is a hack for Windows 7....

It's against Apple's intent of only having Airplay work with devices supporting the feature (which somehow adds a lot to the price of an AV receiver).

So excited about the Raspberry it's going to be so much fun and great to think that it will hopefully breed a new generation of developers.