50,000 credit card numbers stolen in Stratfor cyber attack

A few days ago, Anonymous took credit for yet another cyber attack on a business. This time it was the private security service Stratfor that was the victim. However, unlike previous attacks by Anonymous and similar groups over the past year, this one actually resulted in credit card numbers being stolen from the company's servers.

Anonymous has already released a number of the files it has taken from Stratfor. Acccording to a report from the identity theft protection company Identity Finder, 50,277 credit card numbers were taken from Stratfor's servers, based on what Anonymous has leaked so far. 9,651 of those credit card numbers had not yet expired. The report also claims that 44,188 passwords were stolen from the server and Identity Finder says over 50 percent of those passwords could be easily cracked. Only 4.6 percent of those passwords would be considered "strong".

Anonymous has also taken a lot of emails from Stratfor's servers and claims in a Twitter message that the emails it plans to release will show that Stratfor "is not the 'harmless company' it tries to paint itself as." Stratfor says on its Facebook page it plans to start sending out emails to those who have been affected by the attack no later than Wednesday.

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16 Comments

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Its the same old thing they ALWAYS do. Pretend they are helping the consumer, yet at the same time hand out the financial information and personal info of all the people they claim they are there to help.

I honestly think its just a coverup for their own crime spree.

Will someone find out who anon is and sell the info to the mexican cartel, don't they want to get their hands on them? But we all know they are only "tough guys" while hidden online like the pansy girls they are. None of them would ever have the balls to show themselves. The fact people support them after they give out innocent peoples credit card numbers and bank info shows exactly how stupid the followers are as well as them.

I'm not saying they're brave or cowardly but you have to admit that if the Mexican cartel was looking for you then I think you'd hide too. Those cartel guys don't mess around. Call me cowardly but I'd be spending all of my efforts trying to avoid a Columbian necktie!!

I bet it was one of thesse *******s that stoled my credit card info and charging $1.00 here and there since May. Then over thanksgiving weekend they got greedy and tried to run up the charges on my card by taking advantage of Steam's Black Friday sales. Weird part the $1.00 charges never showed up on my account info as the credit card company red flag them and watched my account!

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
The first time you had $1.00 taken out of your account you should have cancelled the card and got a new number, problem avoided.

I guess you didn't read all of what I had posted

Weird part the $1.00 charges never showed up on my account info as the credit card company red flag them and watched my account!

Tender Foot said,

I guess you didn't read all of what I had posted

Weird part the $1.00 charges never showed up on my account info as the credit card company red flag them and watched my account!

Then how did you know they were taking out $1 charges since May?? And what crappy credit card company is watching these fraudulent transactions that they then reverse the transactions but leave the card number active knowing it's been compromised!? Time to change banks.

I found out when I got account alert email saying my account was red flagged due to $33.00 charged to Steam the Saturday after thanksgiving. I first thought it was a scam email, I logged into my account and it was red flagged and to call the bank. I had to verify the amount and the merchants so they can investigate the fraud charges.

Well they have to watch the compromised accounts so they can investigate them and hopefully bust those doing it. As long I know I'm not responsible for those charges and they have my back I'm not changing banks. Yes I did get a new account number!

joep1984 said,
"Everyone should love us...in the meantime, here's stolen credit card numbers, GO BANANAS, FOLKS!"

and any one who is stupid enough to use those card numbers and ID information will end up with the police knocking at there door.

at least the cards them selves have some form of online protection with cards like mastercard with there "secure code" and visa's "Varified by visa" but of course
those are totaly useless if the passwords that have been leaked are the same as those used as password for the above security features put in place by the card companies..

This is not getting funny anymore. These guys seem to cause more and more financial loss, and in the end it's always the consumer that ends up with all the problems. I think Anonymous should start reviewing their strategies.

Odom said,
This is not getting funny anymore. These guys seem to cause more and more financial loss, and in the end it's always the consumer that ends up with all the problems. I think Anonymous should start reviewing their strategies.

Sometimes I appreciate their choice of targets at least. Too much shady biz going on behind closed doors these days.

And sometimes I do not.

randomevent said,

Sometimes I appreciate their choice of targets at least. Too much shady biz going on behind closed doors these days.

And sometimes I do not.


It's their approach of hurting a business's customers to make them hate the business that I have zero respect for.

It shows a great lack of creativity on Anon's part that they can't, after all this time, come up with a way to tackle 'bad guys' without hurting tens of thousands of people who did nothing wrong. But they've always been nothing but lazy, childish brats with delusions of their own internet might.

randomevent said,

Sometimes I appreciate their choice of targets at least. Too much shady biz going on behind closed doors these days.

And sometimes I do not.


Whilst the company will look back for being hacked, or whatever other effects this has, what would you have to do if you credit card details were stolen?
First, you'd have to know about it, meaning you find out the bad way (when your card gets charged with something you didn't buy), or the company will contact you, saying your details were stolen.
You need to cancel the card, contact the bank, wait for the new one to arrive, remember new pin again. All this during christmas season where credit card usage ist at its peak. If money was already taken off of it, you have even more hassle with the bank so you get it refunded, etc.....

randomevent said,

Sometimes I appreciate their choice of targets at least. Too much shady biz going on behind closed doors these days.

And sometimes I do not.

My local news channel did a story on this. They took money from normal everyday citizens in this attack also. What good does that do?

Odom said,
This is not getting funny anymore. These guys seem to cause more and more financial loss, and in the end it's always the consumer that ends up with all the problems. I think Anonymous should start reviewing their strategies.

Which guys? ?The anonymous guys? That's inherently an oxymoron - you don't know who these guys are because they are anonymous - but instead you act like you know who they are because they are "anonymous".

I hate how it took less than one year to completely change the meaning of the word anonymous.