80+ bug fixes in store for Mac OS X 10.5.7

Although Apple's new Snow Leopard operating system is in the pipeline, and coming up for a release sometime this year, work it still being continued on their current operating system, Leopard.

As AppleInsider reports, on Thursday, Apple made a new build (codenamed "Juno") of Leopard's 10.5.7 available to developers, bringing with it over 80 bug fixes and updates. Those who have had some hands on time with the build (number 9J30) have said it includes an updated Flash Player, as well as 5 other bug fixes, bringing the grand total in the 10.5.7 update to over 80, as mentioned.

Apple has also fixed security and cookie issues with Safari, as well as concentrating on iChat, iCal, the CoreGraphics framework and the HFS+ file system. These fixes aim to please, as I myself have had cookie issues with Safari, and it should provide a suitable update whilst Snow Leopard finishes development.

It is expected that more pre-release builds of this update will be sent to developers in the near future, so it's unsure how far away 10.5.7 is from public availability.

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25 Comments

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I STILL have the bug where Leopard won't automatically remember and connect to my wireless network, as does a friend of mine. I've tried several remedies and still no go. Apparantly it's not as isolated as I thought!

I say the same thing when I get my Linux fixes, or when Microsoft releases patches to fix items, too.

It is good to get fixes.

It is the unfixed items (especially the known ones that have been open a long time) that are frustrating.

Good to see more updates.
Few requests from my list:

- When you quit Mail and you don't have an internet connection it always crashes
- Activate the minimized window when clicking on an app icon in the Dock (e.g. works for Firefox but not for Software update)
- Give an option just to sort by name and have the folders appear first (like in Windows)
- Front Row could use some more options, it's weird that you have to hack your way into multi-display support etc.

What's wrong with Spaces? I've only been using Leopard for a week + now, but I've not had any problems using Spaces.

DrunknMunky said,
What's wrong with Spaces? I've only been using Leopard for a week + now, but I've not had any problems using Spaces.

Office + Spaces = nightmare. Although don't know if that was Apples fault.

Examinus said,
Office is rubbish with Spaces as is Adobe CS, plus Spaces have a mind of their own when an application takes focus. Woosh!

Office and Adobe problems isn't in Apple's control. What problem do you have with applications taking focus? There's a setting in the preference pane to change it.

Examinus said,
Yes they are.

How? Adobe's products are made by Adobe and Office is made by Microsoft. It's not any more Apple's problem that it is Microsoft's problem that iTunes doesn't work properly on Windows.

GreyWolfSC said,
How? Adobe's products are made by Adobe and Office is made by Microsoft. It's not any more Apple's problem that it is Microsoft's problem that iTunes doesn't work properly on Windows.


It's a ridiculous assertion that a programmer has no control over his program's compatibility with other products.

Apple have previously released updates that improved compatibility with third-party products. The responsibility lies in the hands of both, however this article was specifically about Apple, hence my original comment.

Examinus said,
It's a ridiculous assertion that a programmer has no control over his program's compatibility with other products.

Apple have previously released updates that improved compatibility with third-party products. The responsibility lies in the hands of both, however this article was specifically about Apple, hence my original comment.


Apple have released compatibility updates for major vendors, but it's not their ultimate responsibility to do so as it is the other party's.

Most software I have encountered play fine with spaces, so I'd assume that Apple is taking a neutral stance in their software to allow Adobe or MacBU to fix their own bugs.

giga said,

Apple have released compatibility updates for major vendors, but it's not their ultimate responsibility to do so as it is the other party's.

Most software I have encountered play fine with spaces, so I'd assume that Apple is taking a neutral stance in their software to allow Adobe or MacBU to fix their own bugs.


It's the responsibility of both, but seeing as it is Spaces that has introduced the problems with Office and Adobe CS, I would, personally, place the weight of that on Apple.

Examinus said,

It's the responsibility of both, but seeing as it is Spaces that has introduced the problems with Office and Adobe CS, I would, personally, place the weight of that on Apple.


An operating system manufacturer really has no obligation to go out of their way to correct other's bugs.

If the majority of third party software have no compatibility issues with spaces, I don't see much of a problem on Apple's part, considering the time and resources they would have to re-allocate just for another developer's software. (considerable time and resources in fact, if you imagine the size and intricacies of Office and CS)

giga said,

An operating system manufacturer really has no obligation to go out of their way to correct other's bugs.

If the majority of third party software have no compatibility issues with spaces, I don't see much of a problem on Apple's part, considering the time and resources they would have to re-allocate just for another developer's software. (considerable time and resources in fact, if you imagine the size and intricacies of Office and CS)


As I said before, it's ridiculous to assert that Apple have no control over their product's compatibility with others. Two products' incompatibilities are the problem of both parties; you can't just blame one side or say Apple don't have any control over the issue. They most certainly do.

You've changed your stance from Apple having no control over this issue to having no responsibility. Responsibility is most certainly up for grabs, but control isn't. I think it was 10.5.2 that fixed a lot of problems with Spaces and applications: including Adobe CS. I just wish they'd go further and fix a few more (hopefully they have). That too applies to Adobe and Microsoft, but seeing as this article is about Apple, I commented on their position.

Examinus said,

As I said before, it's ridiculous to assert that Apple have no control over their product's compatibility with others. Two products' incompatibilities are the problem of both parties; you can't just blame one side or say Apple don't have any control over the issue. They most certainly do.

You've changed your stance from Apple having no control over this issue to having no responsibility. Responsibility is most certainly up for grabs, but control isn't. I think it was 10.5.2 that fixed a lot of problems with Spaces and applications: including Adobe CS. I just wish they'd go further and fix a few more (hopefully they have). That too applies to Adobe and Microsoft, but seeing as this article is about Apple, I commented on their position.


Fair enough, I'll admit I used the term "control" unfairly for this context. Responsibility still stands though.

Office is an important program to have, and it worked fine with the previous Mac OS, so it seems like Leopard was the one that made it incompatible. That's how I see it.

andrewbares said,
Office is an important program to have, and it worked fine with the previous Mac OS, so it seems like Leopard was the one that made it incompatible. That's how I see it.

Previous Mac OS releases didn't have spaces--how is that relevant? Office and CS are compatible with Leopard, they just don't play nicely with Spaces like all other applications. If you don't use spaces, then it's an issue.