Amazon Web Services to include Windows Server support

Amazon Web Services announced on Sunday that free users of its cloud-based service would now be able to access Microsoft's Windows Server on Amazon's machines. The announcement states, " ... customers eligible for the AWS Free Usage tier can now use up to 750 hours per month of t1.micro instances running Microsoft Windows Server for free."

Amazon added in its press announcement:

With this announcement, customers familiar with Windows Server can gain hands-on-experience with AWS at no-cost. Customers can select from a range of pre-configured Amazon Machine Images with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2. Once running, customers can connect via Microsoft Remote Desktop Client to begin building, migrating, testing, and deploying their web applications on AWS in minutes. The expanded Free Usage Tier with Microsoft Windows Server t1.micro instances is available today in all regions, except for AWS GovCloud.

Amazon Web Services competes with, among other companies, Microsoft's own Windows Azure for cloud-based computing services. However, this move by Amazon this might actually help Microsoft in the long run since cloud-based server users will be able to access Microsoft's offering for free and then perhaps become interested in using Microsoft's own cloud system.

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this move by Amazon this might actually help Microsoft in the long run since cloud-based server users will be able to access Microsoft's offering for free and then perhaps become interested in using Microsoft's own cloud system.

I'm pretty sure the design goals of azure are to keep you out of the OS configuration, using predefined roles.

Of course, Azure is full of options. I for one would rather learn the cloud model Azure promotes than have to busy myself with OS level access for configurations and deployments.

dotf said,

I'm pretty sure the design goals of azure are to keep you out of the OS configuration, using predefined roles.

Of course, Azure is full of options. I for one would rather learn the cloud model Azure promotes than have to busy myself with OS level access for configurations and deployments.


But the skills gained from doing things the other way (ie the way AWS is promoting) are more useful.

thejohnnyq said,
so, 31.25 days of Windows Server per month, interesting

It's a special leap year. They're adding the extra day to October this time.

If you run more than one instance of Windows Server it will gobble up your free hours faster. So, yes you can run out of free time. :-)