AMD plans GPGPU SDK updates including DirectX 11 support

AMD has announced that they planning new updates to its SDK to further increase the ease and efficiently of software development using future versions of the Stream SDK. The improvements will reduce time and effort needed to produce GPU accelerated applications running on multiple platforms using industry standard API's and enhanced support for C/C++

Through a series of upgrades over the next 18 months AMD will add full support for DirectX 11. DirectX 11 is expected to build upon the already outstanding performance of DirectX 10.1 for 3-D graphics rendering and gaming control.

It is also being designed to introduce a host of new technologies aimed at making it easier for programmers to create general purpose graphics processing (GPGPU) accelerated applications that can run on any Windows Vista powered platform.

"Just as it ushered in the era of advanced 3-D gaming for the masses, DirectX is poised to be at the vanguard of the GPGPU revolution," said Anantha Kancherla, manager of Windows desktop and graphics technologies, Microsoft. "DirectX 11 gives developers the power to more easily harness the astonishing capabilities of AMD GPUs for general purpose computation, and gives consumers an effortless way to experience all that AMD Stream has to offer, on the hundreds of millions of Microsoft Windows powered systems worldwide."

As previously announced AMD is also supporting efforts to develop OpenCL as an open standard and plans to evolve the Stream SDK to be OpenCL compliant. Through equal support for both DirectX 11 and OpenCL, and by continuing to give developers the option of creating and using their own programming languages and high level tools, AMD is executing on a strategy designed to give programmers maximum choice and flexibility.

"Industry standards are essential to unlocking the compute potential of GPUs and driving broad adoption of this capability in mainstream applications," said Rick Bergman, senior vice president and general manager, Graphics Product Group, AMD. "GPGPU is now moving past the era of closed and fully proprietary development chains. With the advent of DirectX 11 and OpenCL, C/C++ programmers worldwide will have standardized and easier ways of leveraging the GPU's computational capabilities."

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10 Comments

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nVidia has not much cash in their pockets at the moment, and in the business they are in, spending money for R&D is all it is about. Without that, they will not be able to introduce much innovation in a timely fashion, and with Intel addind itself to their competition, it could be a very slow death for nVidia..

Oh please, Nvidia survived the 5x00 series fiasco, and that was a much more dangerous time for them.

I'm pretty sure that Nvidia's decision to not employ DX10.1 was more political than anything. Given that new hardware is required for DX10.1, and most developers have barely embraced DX10, there's no point including anyone including DX10.1 functionality. Nvidia's choice to not employ DX10.1 hopefully means that developers won't just skip past DX10 and develop for DX10.1, leaving the millions of us with DX10 graphics cards out in the cold. That, in my opinion would be the real backstab for the consumer.

(Majesticmerc said @ #2.1)
Oh please, Nvidia survived the 5x00 series fiasco, and that was a much more dangerous time for them.

I'm pretty sure that Nvidia's decision to not employ DX10.1 was more political than anything. Given that new hardware is required for DX10.1, and most developers have barely embraced DX10, there's no point including anyone including DX10.1 functionality. Nvidia's choice to not employ DX10.1 hopefully means that developers won't just skip past DX10 and develop for DX10.1, leaving the millions of us with DX10 graphics cards out in the cold. That, in my opinion would be the real backstab for the consumer.


DX10 and 10.1 are essentially the same, IIRC its just fixs for problems with DX10. Assassin's Creed supported DX10.1, and there was no difference visually (except for some improved AA) but performance was increased significantly on cards supporting DX 10.1 (So, ATI/AMD). Unfortunatly it seems NVIDIA didnt like that, and suddenly a patch appeared that ""fixed"" DX10.1 support (or rather, removed it). It just shows how easy it is to support DX 10.1 if you already support DX10. What's holding it back is NVIDIA. You think that NVIDIA are going to let TWIMTBP games give an advantage to competing products?

(Majesticmerc said @ #2.1)
...... leaving the millions of us with DX10 graphics cards out in the cold. That, in my opinion would be the real backstab for the consumer.

Yeah cos thats what Nvidia were doing, Championing the little guy and saving us money...

*this message contains sarcasm*

(Daniel said @ #1.1)
hehe true but atleast AMD bothered with 10.1 seems nvidia are going to skip straight to DX11 :(

... if nVidia will survive as it is for the next 6 months, that is..

(Daniel said @ #1.1)
hehe true but atleast AMD bothered with 10.1 seems nvidia are going to skip straight to DX11 :(

They're not actually skipping it, they're just not doing it exactly to MS spec. They're being half-assed about it and adding stuff their own way which probably makes their GPUs perform better or something.

Besides 10.1 isn't big on features from what I remember.

And and performance with DX10 on Vista, last I checked, has caught up to what it was on XP with DX9. nVidia and ATi have both managed to get the drivers working well.

(GP007 said @ #1.3)

They're not actually skipping it, they're just not doing it exactly to MS spec. They're being half-assed about it and adding stuff their own way which probably makes their GPUs perform better or something.

Besides 10.1 isn't big on features from what I remember.

And and performance with DX10 on Vista, last I checked, has caught up to what it was on XP with DX9. nVidia and ATi have both managed to get the drivers working well.

Well, all 10.1 was making some optional parts of the DirectX 10 specification, compulsory in 10.1 - IIRC there was a list recently posted on the matter. You'll find that the majority of DirectX 10 already support 10.1.

Its no different to say when OpenGL went to 2.0 - there was nothing new added persay, it was merely a consolidation of a whole heap of extensions which each company introduced - they just bought these extensions in as part of the OpenGL specification. Like DirectX 10, alot of the cards were already OpenGL 2.0 compliant before the specification was finalised.