AMD sets new world record for fastest CPU

How fast is your CPU on your gaming PC rig? You may think that you have a fast processor inside, all overclocked and cooled to the max. But recently a team managed to boost the speed of an AMD processor so much it got the attention of the Guinness World Record folks. In a new blog post by AMD, the company revealed that on August 31, the team achieved a speed of 8.429 GHz out of an AMD FX processor in an event in Austin, Texas. The new clock speed has been recognized by Guinness under the "Highest Frequency of a Computer Processor" category. You can check out a video showing the team cooling the processor and setting the new world record below.

The increase in speed was achieved by a combination of increasing the voltage with cooling the CPU with liquid helium, which took the temperature down to just a few degrees above absolute zero. The team itself was comprised of what AMD called "elite overclocking specialists" that worked with AMD engineers to reach the new record. However AMD said that they achieved overclocked speeds of 5 GHz with the same processor using just air or an off the shelf cooling system that cost less than $100.

The processor used to reach that new CPU speed record was the AMD FX, an upcoming eight core processor that uses the Bulldozer design. The CPU hasn't even been released yet by AMD. It's scheduled to launch sometime in the fourth quarter of 2011.

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Big friggin woop they used only 2 cores to get this result according to CPUz lets see them do it with all 8 cores please then tell us it's a world record

I'm going to assume this isn't 8.429 GHz total, as that wouldn't be a big deal for an 8 core proc...so doing the math we're talking about 8.429 GHz * 8 cores = 67.432 GHz total. That's worth talking about for sure.

meh456 said,
I'm going to assume this isn't 8.429 GHz total, as that wouldn't be a big deal for an 8 core proc...so doing the math we're talking about 8.429 GHz * 8 cores = 67.432 GHz total. That's worth talking about for sure.

It doesn't work like that. Sure there are 8 cores operating at 8GHz each, but that doesn't mean you multiple each core by the clock frequency. Using the same logic it would mean that you should expect an exponential increase in CPU computational power compared to a single core CPU and that just is not the case.

I hope Bulldozer lives up to the hype. Even if it can just match the performance of Sandy Bridge for a lower price it may justify how late it is. If it falls short, it's gonna be a disaster for AMD.

Although it has the highest frequency does this make it the "fastest" in a computational sense?

Knowing that the Intel chips are pretty far ahead on a clock-for-clock basis I'd imagine no?

Isn't it awesome, AMD? Just release the stuff already before Sandies-E come and take away all your bragging with "first come, first served" sales.

5ghz on air, man that is awesome ...

helium, something new as I thought hydrogen was good enough in a way ...

will be some time till they lower that 3.5cm margin .. imagine , with the quantum computer released for research, thigs should change quite fast in the next 50yrs

zeta_immersion said,
5ghz on air, man that is awesome ...

helium, something new as I thought hydrogen was good enough in a way ...

will be some time till they lower that 3.5cm margin .. imagine , with the quantum computer released for research, thigs should change quite fast in the next 50yrs

The problem with Hydrogen it is that it is unstable. So, not a very good candidate to cool something.

zeta_immersion said,
5ghz on air, man that is awesome ...

helium, something new as I thought hydrogen was good enough in a way ...

will be some time till they lower that 3.5cm margin .. imagine , with the quantum computer released for research, thigs should change quite fast in the next 50yrs

Liquid helium is about as cold as it comes with cooling.and it features most predominantly cooling quantum processors.

sviola said,

The problem with Hydrogen it is that it is unstable. So, not a very good candidate to cool something.

Not to mention the extreme flammability when it vaporizes.

Courtesy of a co-worker who has too much time to google stuff:
Google Search: c / 8.429GHz
Result: the speed of light / (8.42900 gigahertz) = 3.55667882 centimeters

FuhrerDarqueSyde said,
Courtesy of a co-worker who has too much time to google stuff:
Google Search: c / 8.429GHz
Result: the speed of light / (8.42900 gigahertz) = 3.55667882 centimeters

And you know what that means? Relativistic computational lag inside the core

Sraf said,

And you know what that means? Relativistic computational lag inside the core

VTOS - Virtual Time Operating System
Your computational tasks return results today but they're actually running next week.

Too bad it's obviously an engineering sample chip. Certainly looking forward to getting one of these processors and stuff but the wait is getting rather irritating being put off for now nearly 6 months and counting. It's getting to be rather ridiculous like a repeat of phenom cluster screw up all over again.

That's crazy. I remember Tom's Hardware overclocking with liquid nitrogen. That helium really blew my mind!
Imagine run in that kind of setup at home.

Quick Shot said,
That's crazy. I remember Tom's Hardware overclocking with liquid nitrogen. That helium really blew my mind!
Imagine run in that kind of setup at home.

but for what?

littleneutrino said,
I do not think those numbers should count if you have to use Liquid helium to keep the system cool enough.

These records are always set using coolants like liquid nitrogen and the sort, so this is really par for the course as far as that is concerned

littleneutrino said,
I do not think those numbers should count if you have to use Liquid helium to keep the system cool enough.
They weren't trying to get it to run 24/7 with that OC, they wanted it to be stable long enough to boot to Windows for a CPU-Z validation.