Android OS overtakes iPhone OS in the U.S.

The NPD Group on Monday announced that Google’s Android operating system has overtaken Apple’s iPhone in total US smartphone market share. 

Sourcing the latest sales figures from the first quarter of 2010, Android OS powered phones are now in second place (28%) behind RIM’s Blackberry OS which holds a strong 36% share. Apple’s iPhone OS stands in third place with a 21% market share. 

As in the past, carrier distribution and promotion have played a crucial role in determining smartphone market share,” said Ross Rubin, executive director of industry analysis for NPD. “In order to compete with the iPhone, Verizon Wireless has expanded its buy-one-get-one offer beyond RIM devices to now include all of their smartphones.

The market research company found that strong sales of the Motorola Droid, HTC Droid Eris, and Blackberry Curve helped Verizon to keep up with AT&T’s own strong smartphone sales. AT&T held the title of the number one smartphone carrier with almost a third of the market at 32%, while Verizon followed closely at 30%, and T-Mobile and Sprint lagged behind at 17 and 15 percent respectively. 

Image credit NPD

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So why might this be good news for Apple? Both the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission are considering an anti-trust suit against Apple over banning non-Apple tools for developing for the iPhone. But if the iPhone is only number 3 in smartphone sales, Apple might argue that the suit should be thrown out because it is not dominant in the market. By losing, Apple may come out a winner.

http://blogs.computerworld.com..._sales_will_apple_celebrate

People talking about Android being in this position due to multiple carriers/phones is a fair point. But let's not forget that the iPhone was released way before the majority of Android phones so has had more time to get it's market share.

Oh I love it. This news makes me very happy. Apple screwed themselves by remaining exclusive to AT&T.

On a side note, I really hope that the rumors are true that the iPhone is not going to Verizon till next year.

And on another side note, I love my HTC Incredible (Far superior phone than the iPhone 3GS).

UndergroundWire said,
Oh I love it. This news makes me very happy. Apple screwed themselves by remaining exclusive to AT&T.

On a side note, I really hope that the rumors are true that the iPhone is not going to Verizon till next year.

And on another side note, I love my HTC Incredible (Far superior phone than the iPhone 3GS).

Even though I have an iPhone I am also very happy to hear this news. Android rules I feel guilty I have an iPhone, just love eye candy!

Edited by witalit, May 11 2010, 8:42am :

witalit said,

Even though I have an iPhone I am also very happy to hear this news. Android rules I feel guilty I have an iPhone, just love eye candy!


iToo fell iN love with the "iCandy" but iCould not part with Verizon. AT&T has no signal iN my building @ JFK Airport because iT iS all concrete and metal. However iDid get the iPod Touch just to see what iT iS all about. iKept telling people iHave an iPhone too. However iCan't make phone calls on iT and the best reception iS when iHave my wireless on. They told me "Yeah, AT&T service sucks".

speedstr3789 said,
macs: one company
Windows: dozens of companies. Anything seem familiar?

Yeah I would agree with you except Why didn't WinMo take off? Windows Mobile has been available on all the networks with a variety of phones for a number of years. Your argument is lacking.

Google's Android OS has something that users want with the variety of phones that users can choose from. When it comes to Windows Mobile, crap is crap (IMO). The only thing I ever liked about Windows Mobile is the HTC sense UI. Oh, but I wait a minute I have that on my Incredible

UndergroundWire said,

Yeah I would agree with you except Why didn't WinMo take off? Windows Mobile has been available on all the networks with a variety of phones for a number of years. Your argument is lacking.

Google's Android OS has something that users want with the variety of phones that users can choose from. When it comes to Windows Mobile, crap is crap (IMO). The only thing I ever liked about Windows Mobile is the HTC sense UI. Oh, but I wait a minute I have that on my Incredible


MS's problem is that they had to develop WinMobile for WAY too many form factors (BB-like devices, sliders w/o QWERTY keyboards, sliders w/ QWERTY, full touchscreen, scanners, PDAs, etc.) which fragmented the platform on many levels and slowed down development of the OS (developing for so many form factors takes a lot of time). Pretty much all Android phones have standardized around only two or three types of form factors due to Google's requirements.

Take that iPhone !
Nothing can beat the flexibility of Android.
Let the fanboys keep locked inside their limited world.
I hope MS comes up with something good for the next mobile version. So we can push completely iphone fanboys into their holes....

Krpano said,
Take that iPhone !
Nothing can beat the flexibility of Android.
Let the fanboys keep locked inside their limited world.
I hope MS comes up with something good for the next mobile version. So we can push completely iphone fanboys into their holes....

But.. I don't want to go into a hole with other people... I want my own hole. Or do you intend to round us all up together.. and then gas us?

Funny how the Fanboys are still defending their beloved out of date phone. As previously commented Video's and MMS - WOW...

Makes me warm and fuzzy inside to see Android increasing market share, I've coerced 10 others in a small office to go down the Android route. Not bad considering there are only 20 of us.

alcur said,
Funny how the Fanboys are still defending their beloved out of date phone. As previously commented Video's and MMS - WOW...

Makes me warm and fuzzy inside to see Android increasing market share, I've coerced 10 others in a small office to go down the Android route. Not bad considering there are only 20 of us.

Sad that you have to coerce them to do it. I just hand my iPhone to someone without saying a word and they want one.... let the flaming begin

Moved from a heritage of Nokia handsets after a decade to... Android.

Don't like the iPhone - I like removable storage and battery, ability to install what I want, flash etc. Also big on not have a 3rd gen handset in 2010 who's advertising that it can... record video AND send it! (yeah - big wow!)

So I've held off, happy on the N series until now. HTC Desire... And it ROCKS!

Funny how among my friends there are 10 iPhones to... oh wait, I've never actually seen an Android. Thinking about loading a iPhone 3G with Android so I can check it out..

crazyfish said,
Funny how among my friends there are 10 iPhones to... oh wait, I've never actually seen an Android. Thinking about loading a iPhone 3G with Android so I can check it out..

All my related own or a notebook or a pc then i can conclude that every person must own or a pc or a notebook.

logic fail.

crazyfish said,
Funny how among my friends there are 10 iPhones to... oh wait, I've never actually seen an Android. Thinking about loading a iPhone 3G with Android so I can check it out..

Android is a nice OS, just switched from a WinMo 6.1 device today and I have to say, so far, i'm impressed.

However, with it being open source, to me i feels a little bit clumsy and doesn't feel as cohesive as WinMo, but i'm enjoying using it all the same.

The handset i'm using is an HTC Desire.

Magallanes said,

All my related own or a notebook or a pc then i can conclude that every person must own or a pc or a notebook.

logic fail.


Grammar fail. I had to read over that a few times before I realized what you meant.

neo158 said,

Android is a nice OS, just switched from a WinMo 6.1 device today and I have to say, so far, i'm impressed.

However, with it being open source, to me i feels a little bit clumsy and doesn't feel as cohesive as WinMo, but i'm enjoying using it all the same.

The handset i'm using is an HTC Desire.


What does that have to do with it being open source?

Silverskull said,

What does that have to do with it being open source?

You'd think not much, but there is a slight 'cobbled together' feel to a lot of it. It's not so much a result of being open source as a coincidentally frequent characteristic of software that happens to be open source.

Joshie said,

You'd think not much, but there is a slight 'cobbled together' feel to a lot of it. It's not so much a result of being open source as a coincidentally frequent characteristic of software that happens to be open source.

Thanks, I didn't quite know how to say that. HTC Sense does help to eliminate the issue though.

However, as I said i'm enjoying using Android anyway!!!

Ci7 said,
symbian doesn't count ?

It's a good point, but it remains the No.1 for the world, by a large margin too.

Krpano said,
MS better hurry with their next mobile OS before it is too late, and better be good.

Why? The smartphone wars are just getting started. No one's late to this party yet...

Doesn't really surprise me. Android and BB have 2 big things going for them: on multiple providers, and have lots of feature options and price points. iPhone has good marketing and is generally liked by people outside of Neowin. AT&T on the other hand....

Shadrack said,
Doesn't really surprise me. Android and BB have 2 big things going for them: on multiple providers, and have lots of feature options and price points. iPhone has good marketing and is generally liked by people outside of Neowin. AT&T on the other hand....

Pretty interesting that one single unit has 20% (give or take) of the market while on on one carrier while it takes multiple units from other providers on multiple carriers to get those numbers. Means the iPhone is much more popular than people on Neowin will admit to. Would be interesting to see what would happen if it was on the same number of carriers as Android.

SputnikGamer said,

Pretty interesting that one single unit has 20% (give or take) of the market while on on one carrier while it takes multiple units from other providers on multiple carriers to get those numbers. Means the iPhone is much more popular than people on Neowin will admit to. Would be interesting to see what would happen if it was on the same number of carriers as Android.

The popularity is admitted most of the time, but they go on to say that all of those who bought them, including the Windows users among them, are sheep that look only for form over function.

NeoTrunks said,

The popularity is admitted most of the time, but they go on to say that all of those who bought them, including the Windows users among them, are sheep that look only for form over function.

Which I never understood considering the Android OS has yet to do anything the iPhone OS can't do except *gasp* multitask. O yea, it can do that now too with the new update.

SputnikGamer said,

Which I never understood considering the Android OS has yet to do anything the iPhone OS can't do except *gasp* multitask. O yea, it can do that now too with the new update.

You forgot "install anything you want to install out of the box".

Beastage said,
Wait wait... OS ... X?! someone needs to check their graphs before they publish them.

iPhone OS shares some fundamental pieces with OS X

Admodieus said,

iPhone OS shares some fundamental pieces with OS X


Just like Windows Mobile and Windows 7 right?

They are related but different operating systems. I agree with Beastage's comment.

So they got the name of the OS wrong in the article...big flipping deal and no need to argue about it. The point still stands, Android OS over took iPhone OS.

Beastage said,
Wait wait... OS ... X?! someone needs to check their graphs before they publish them.

iPhone OS is really just OS X under the skin.

Admodieus said,

iPhone OS shares some fundamental pieces with OS X

Same DNA but completely different OS, then they should call Andriod Linux... your point?

Edited by dimithrak, May 10 2010, 6:49pm :

dimithrak said,

Same DNA but completely different OS, then they should call Andriod Linux... your point?

If you choose to use the name Android Linux at least learn how to spell "Android" correctly.

Edited by neo158, May 10 2010, 7:48pm :

Pong said,

iPhone OS is really just OS X under the skin.

Then why didn't they use OS X on the iPad? Not wanting to start a flame war, just curious.

neo158 said,

If you choose to use the name Android Linux at least learn how to spell "Android" correctly.


Except he wasn't using the name Android Linux. Clearly you were so focused on correcting his spelling error that you skipped over his meaning.

IndyLateNite said,

Then why didn't they use OS X on the iPad? Not wanting to start a flame war, just curious.

Because they didn't want to go for the full on tablet PC. Lots of people have tried it before and failed, not just because their hardware wasn't up to scratch but because software just wasn't ready for touchscreen devices yet.

OS X in is desktop form is designed for mouse (or keyboard) navigation. A tablet doesn't have either and fingers are really, really clumsy in comparison. Why spend a lot of money making the Desktop shell for OS X tocuhscreen ready when you already have a very solid touchscreen shell on the iPod/iPhone?

There are other reasons too. They obviously wanted iPhone apps to run on the iPad. They make far too much money from them to waste such a big resource. iPhone apps wouldn't run on x86 hardware that would be required by the desktop version of OS X, and for that matter either would applications designed for OS X (without being recompiled). It just doesn't make sense to put a desktop OS onto a touchscreen device.

Pong said,

There are other reasons too. They obviously wanted iPhone apps to run on the iPad. They make far too much money from them to waste such a big resource. iPhone apps wouldn't run on x86 hardware that would be required by the desktop version of OS X, and for that matter either would applications designed for OS X (without being recompiled). It just doesn't make sense to put a desktop OS onto a touchscreen device.

Was too late to edit my last paragraph so here it is edited to be correct.

iPhone apps wouldn't run on the x86 hardware required by the desktop version of OS X and for that matter either would applications designed for OS X (without being recompiled) if they decided to port the Desktop version to the new architecture. It just doesn't make sense to put a desktop OS onto a touchscreen device.

warwagon said,
Iphone OS on just 1 phone, Android OS on a bunch of different phones.

It's on more than one phone, they're just all by the same manufacturer.

Edited by Pong, May 10 2010, 5:49pm :

warwagon said,
Iphone OS on just 1 phone, Android OS on a bunch of different phones.

I don't see how that makes any difference. The report does not say HTC overtakes Apple. Its Android leaving iphone OS behind.

Apple as a company decided to keep their OS close to them and put it only on their hardware. Android over-taking iphone OS had to happen sooner or later thanks to the openness of the platform.

Edited by bluezz, May 10 2010, 5:25pm :

Pong said,

It's on more than one phone, they're just all by the same manufacturer.

haha

Not to mention that Android is used on MP3 players as well. Dont fault or make excuses that Android is on more that one phone model as an excuse. Apple screwed themselves with their approach.

techbeck said,

Apple screwed themselves with their approach.

That is such a stupid comment. Their Quarterly earnings really don't match up to what you have stated.

Its a good concept. and its worked well. Nexus one and Google ring any bells? Google themselves directed people to the HTC Incredible.

Having variety is always good. But in certain cases its not. A consumer does not change phones every other month. Its either when their contract ends, or if they have the money to blow. Having one device as a choice with yearly upgrades usually work well for most.

mind you - no apple fanboyism here!

techbeck said,

Apple screwed themselves with their approach.

That is such a stupid comment. Their Quarterly earnings really don't match up to what you have stated.

Its a good concept. and its worked well. Nexus one and Google ring any bells? Google themselves directed people to the HTC Incredible.

Having variety is always good. But in certain cases its not. A consumer does not change phones every other month. Its either when their contract ends, or if they have the money to blow. Having one device as a choice with yearly upgrades usually work well for most.

mind you - no apple fanboyism here!

dimithrak said,

That is such a stupid comment. Their Quarterly earnings really don't match up to what you have stated.

Its a good concept. and its worked well. Nexus one and Google ring any bells? Google themselves directed people to the HTC Incredible.

Having variety is always good. But in certain cases its not. A consumer does not change phones every other month. Its either when their contract ends, or if they have the money to blow. Having one device as a choice with yearly upgrades usually work well for most.

mind you - no apple fanboyism here!

Sounds like fanboyism....but hey, what do i know...I am stupid...right?

Look, it may not show it now...and it may not show it in the future. But being as closed off and proprietary as Apple is...it could happen.

Oh, and way to post your reply...twice....

Edited by techbeck, May 10 2010, 6:02pm :

techbeck said,
Apple screwed themselves with their approach.

Apple has always sold both the hardware and software as a unit. That has not generally been the practice of other phone manufacturers except for Nokia. Android and Windows Mobile run on multiple devices from different manufacturers. iPhone OS runs only on Apple's devices. Apple makes money on the sale of the phone, not the OS, so their total earnings will be higher than Microsoft or Google in the phone arena if the sales volumes are comparable. The same is true in the Desktop and Laptop markets. Apple sells computers, not just an OS. Microsoft sells an OS that runs on multiple platforms and that's where they make their money.

sabrex said,

Apple has always sold both the hardware and software as a unit. That has not generally been the practice of other phone manufacturers except for Nokia. Android and Windows Mobile run on multiple devices from different manufacturers. iPhone OS runs only on Apple's devices. Apple makes money on the sale of the phone, not the OS, so their total earnings will be higher than Microsoft or Google in the phone arena if the sales volumes are comparable. The same is true in the Desktop and Laptop markets. Apple sells computers, not just an OS. Microsoft sells an OS that runs on multiple platforms and that's where they make their money.

For one, my statement was my OPINION and people here seem to take it like I was being factual.

For two...Apples approach has been working but unlike most other companies...they are catering towards the users and are being more open. Apple hasnt changed and it MAY...notice I said MAY...bite them in the ass in the future.

warwagon said,
Iphone OS on just 1 phone, Android OS on a bunch of different phones.

Who cares. The fact is, Android has over taken iPhone OS.

So now, say your a developer. Do you go out and buy a Mac just to develop an app for a smaller market share and have no guarantee that your app will get accepted by the Apple God, or do you just download Eclipse (open source and free) along with the Android SDK on your Windows/Linux/OSX machine and develop an app for a larger market share and stand a better chance of approval?

I own an iPhone but I am very far from a fanboy and knew that eventually Android would take over while Apple stifles development and spoon feeds silly features that should have been in there from day one which Android already has. I would have gone Android had there been better hardware at the time. When my contract is up with ATT I will be going Android and will drop ATT and their crap network like a ton of bricks. I will also finally be able to develop my own apps again like I could with my old WinMo phone.

Edited by ermax, May 10 2010, 7:37pm :

techbeck said,

Sounds like fanboyism....but hey, what do i know...I am stupid...right?

Look, it may not show it now...and it may not show it in the future. But being as closed off and proprietary as Apple is...it could happen.

Oh, and way to post your reply...twice....

The reply twice was my mistake. my bad. Chrome has its issues on and off. Im with you on the whole Apple being closed and all. I don't like that either. But my comment was focused on your the apple screwing itself statement you made..

techbeck said,

Sounds like fanboyism....but hey, what do i know...I am stupid...right?

Look, it may not show it now...and it may not show it in the future. But being as closed off and proprietary as Apple is...it could happen.

Oh, and way to post your reply...twice....

btw.. i was only referring to your comment being stupid. not you..

ermax said,

Who cares. The fact is, Android has over taken iPhone OS.

So now, say your a developer. Do you go out and buy a Mac just to develop an app for a smaller market share and have no guarantee that your app will get accepted by the Apple God, or do you just download Eclipse (open source and free) along with the Android SDK on your Windows/Linux/OSX machine and develop an app for a larger market share and stand a better chance of approval?

But from a development perspective it is easier to develop for the iPhone OS because you only have to develop for one size screen. Android developers have to make sure their apps work across a variety of Android devices. They also have to make sure any UI modifications like HTC's Sense UI work with their apps. There's a lot longer development time associated with Android. If we compared the number of apps available for the iPhone during the same amount of time that Android has been available I'm sure we'd see that iPhone has more apps. And part of that has to be attributed to the code once ability of the iPhone platform.


Here's just one example of what I mean. And I'm sure this is not the rule. Maybe an example of how both platforms are looked at. I could be wrong. And I know that it's comparing the iPad and Android phones but I would assume the same case could be made for the iPhone.
http://www.businessinsider.com...ebits-iphone-android-2010-5

Edited by asdavis10, May 10 2010, 8:11pm :

asdavis10 said,

But from a development perspective it is easier to develop for the iPhone OS because you only have to develop for one size screen. Android developers have to make sure their apps work across a variety of Android devices. They also have to make sure any UI modifications like HTC's Sense UI work with their apps. There's a lot longer development time associated with Android. If we compared the number of apps available for the iPhone during the same amount of time that Android has been available I'm sure we'd see that iPhone has more apps. And part of that has to be attributed to the code once ability of the iPhone platform.


Here's just one example of what I mean. And I'm sure this is not the rule. Maybe an example of how both platforms are looked at. I could be wrong. And I know that it's comparing the iPad and Android phones but I would assume the same case could be made for the iPhone.
http://www.businessinsider.com...ebits-iphone-android-2010-5

As far as I am aware, there are 3 different screen resolutions in use by Android phones. 480x320, 840x400 (can't remember the droids but similar to the Desire). At the moment, there are 2 on the iPhone, 3 when the iPhone 4G comes out with it's higher res screen. Not to mention the iPad is on a 4:3 resolution whereas the iPhones use a 5:4 resolution, whereas all Android devices use 5:4 which will actually make things harder for Apple devs in the coming months.

As for SenseUI... It runs on a custom closed source HTC framework, however the standard Android framework is still included with all HTC devices that use SenseUI, therefore Android applications will work just as well with HTC sense as on standard Android. Android also includes a unified notifications framework, so all Applications can just publish notifications to the UI frontend.

Yes, there are more applications on the Apple's app store, but once you trim away the fat of useless applications, the numbers in terms of what is actually useful will start to look a bit more favourable.

The amount of Applications being submitted to the Android Market at this moment in time is skyrocketing, and more and more developers are targeting it as a result, Android's popularity is skyrocketing at this moment in time, and as it just continues to get better and better it's a trend that I can see continuing for at least the next couple of quarters

Subject Delta said,

As far as I am aware, there are 3 different screen resolutions in use by Android phones. 480x320, 840x400 (can't remember the droids but similar to the Desire). At the moment, there are 2 on the iPhone, 3 when the iPhone 4G comes out with it's higher res screen. Not to mention the iPad is on a 4:3 resolution whereas the iPhones use a 5:4 resolution, whereas all Android devices use 5:4 which will actually make things harder for Apple devs in the coming months.

As for SenseUI... It runs on a custom closed source HTC framework, however the standard Android framework is still included with all HTC devices that use SenseUI, therefore Android applications will work just as well with HTC sense as on standard Android. Android also includes a unified notifications framework, so all Applications can just publish notifications to the UI frontend.

Yes, there are more applications on the Apple's app store, but once you trim away the fat of useless applications, the numbers in terms of what is actually useful will start to look a bit more favourable.

The amount of Applications being submitted to the Android Market at this moment in time is skyrocketing, and more and more developers are targeting it as a result, Android's popularity is skyrocketing at this moment in time, and as it just continues to get better and better it's a trend that I can see continuing for at least the next couple of quarters

At last, a well thought out reply, rather than the useless "product x is awesome because I say so, lawl" posts.


I haven't tried Android yet so personally I can't say whether I like it or not, but I'm glad that the iPhone has some real competition (Ignoring RIM, since I haven't seen it a similar form factor).

Edited by Minimoose, May 10 2010, 9:08pm :

Minimoose said,

At last, a well thought out reply, rather than the useless "product x is awesome because I say so, lawl" posts.


I haven't tried Android yet so personally I can't say whether I like it or not, but I'm glad that the iPhone has some real competition (Ignoring RIM, since I haven't seen it a similar form factor).

Android is still a touch rough around the edges (in that it perhaps isn't as slick as the iPhone's UI), but the implication that it is some form of mobile nerd's OS is just nonsense, it matches the iPhone in every way in terms of features, and isn't that much harder to use. With version 2.2 the last missing bits of the puzzle (like installing apps to an SD card) are due to be put into place, and from then it will just continue to get better.

Android with Sense UI however is just awesome, in my personal opinion a lot nicer than the iPhone's UI.

Another note, for me anyway, is that I find the Android approach of being able to shortcut your apps on your homescreens, and also have a pull out drawer that lists them all in alphabetical order is far more usable than the iPhone's design of just sticking them on a never ending parade of home screens in the order that you download them. Can get real confusing if you install a lot of apps

Subject Delta said,

As far as I am aware, there are 3 different screen resolutions in use by Android phones. 480x320, 840x400 (can't remember the droids but similar to the Desire). At the moment, there are 2 on the iPhone, 3 when the iPhone 4G comes out with it's higher res screen. Not to mention the iPad is on a 4:3 resolution whereas the iPhones use a 5:4 resolution, whereas all Android devices use 5:4 which will actually make things harder for Apple devs in the coming months.

As for SenseUI... It runs on a custom closed source HTC framework, however the standard Android framework is still included with all HTC devices that use SenseUI, therefore Android applications will work just as well with HTC sense as on standard Android. Android also includes a unified notifications framework, so all Applications can just publish notifications to the UI frontend.

Yes, there are more applications on the Apple's app store, but once you trim away the fat of useless applications, the numbers in terms of what is actually useful will start to look a bit more favourable.

The amount of Applications being submitted to the Android Market at this moment in time is skyrocketing, and more and more developers are targeting it as a result, Android's popularity is skyrocketing at this moment in time, and as it just continues to get better and better it's a trend that I can see continuing for at least the next couple of quarters

I wasn't trying to say that developers can't program for Android because of Sense UI. I was just saying that its layers like that which developers have to account for which increases development time. Then you have Samsung or Motorola or any other company that wants to add their mod to the Android OS. Developers have to take all of that into account with Android as well as the different screen resolutions. As for the iPad, I don't think it makes a difference about its resolution because the apps for that are designed for a different type of device. Though iPhone apps can run on it, iPad apps are completely different. I'm sure this will be the same when Android tablets are released. Apps for Android phones may run on it, but Android tablet apps will be different. Yeah there's a lot of junk in the App Store but what you and I might not find useful, I'm sure someone else will. I don't view the total number as a bad thing. I think its good to have choices. Just as it's good that Google decided to develop Android. Choices force competitors to make better products and eventually the cream will rise to the top. I think another thing that is preventing developers from moving to Android is that lack of a proper marketplace to sell their apps. I think everyone sees that the Android market is nowhere as good as far as selling apps as the App Store. But I'm sure the increasing popularity of Android will force Google to create a better way for developers to sell apps as well as attract new developers to the platform. Either way, choice is good. Competition is good.

asdavis10 said,

I wasn't trying to say that developers can't program for Android because of Sense UI. I was just saying that its layers like that which developers have to account for which increases development time. Then you have Samsung or Motorola or any other company that wants to add their mod to the Android OS. Developers have to take all of that into account with Android as well as the different screen resolutions. As for the iPad, I don't think it makes a difference about its resolution because the apps for that are designed for a different type of device. Though iPhone apps can run on it, iPad apps are completely different. I'm sure this will be the same when Android tablets are released. Apps for Android phones may run on it, but Android tablet apps will be different. Yeah there's a lot of junk in the App Store but what you and I might not find useful, I'm sure someone else will. I don't view the total number as a bad thing. I think its good to have choices. Just as it's good that Google decided to develop Android. Choices force competitors to make better products and eventually the cream will rise to the top. I think another thing that is preventing developers from moving to Android is that lack of a proper marketplace to sell their apps. I think everyone sees that the Android market is nowhere as good as far as selling apps as the App Store. But I'm sure the increasing popularity of Android will force Google to create a better way for developers to sell apps as well as attract new developers to the platform. Either way, choice is good. Competition is good.

The apps aren't different, the backend of the iPad OS is exactly the same as that which runs on the iPod touch with some pretty minor hardware and screen size related tweaks.

And like I pointed out, SenseUI changes nothing. Unlike Apple, Google don't enforce design standards that make developers use OS level UI elements, each and every app has it's own unique and custom built UI, Android has been designed in a way that the applications are only dependant on the framework of the OS, whether you use the default Android launcher, or a custom UI like Sense makes no difference at all, applications are using the same set of runtimes. Unlike the iPhone OS, Google have taken the sensible option of detaching the launcher from the rest of the OS. Think of SenseUI as a similar kind of thing to using a custom shell in the place of Windows Explorer. It makes absolutely no difference to how applications function at all, it is nothing more than an alternative shell. Theoretically Android applications could function perfectly well without a shell.

As for your last point... well that frankly is just nonsense really, in terms of how it functions, the Android market is very similar to the Apple app store, in terms of being a centralised center for app distribution. In fact it is better for developers, because the guidlines are simple for developers to follow, there are no ambiguous rules, you don't have to jump through hoops to get your apps approved, and you are free to develop them in any manner you wish without having to worry whether they will be rejected or not because google don't like the way you implement a particular UI element, ETC. In fact both developers and end users get a hell of a lot more freedom, full stop, than they get on Apple's iWhatever devices.

And finally, consider this point: Game developers have been making games that can work on a variety of resolutions for years. It's not as big a deal as people make out

Subject Delta said,

The apps aren't different, the backend of the iPad OS is exactly the same as that which runs on the iPod touch with some pretty minor hardware and screen size related tweaks.

And like I pointed out, SenseUI changes nothing. Unlike Apple, Google don't enforce design standards that make developers use OS level UI elements, each and every app has it's own unique and custom built UI, Android has been designed in a way that the applications are only dependant on the framework of the OS, whether you use the default Android launcher, or a custom UI like Sense makes no difference at all, applications are using the same set of runtimes. Unlike the iPhone OS, Google have taken the sensible option of detaching the launcher from the rest of the OS. Think of SenseUI as a similar kind of thing to using a custom shell in the place of Windows Explorer. It makes absolutely no difference to how applications function at all, it is nothing more than an alternative shell. Theoretically Android applications could function perfectly well without a shell.

As for your last point... well that frankly is just nonsense really, in terms of how it functions, the Android market is very similar to the Apple app store, in terms of being a centralised center for app distribution. In fact it is better for developers, because the guidlines are simple for developers to follow, there are no ambiguous rules, you don't have to jump through hoops to get your apps approved, and you are free to develop them in any manner you wish without having to worry whether they will be rejected or not because google don't like the way you implement a particular UI element, ETC. In fact both developers and end users get a hell of a lot more freedom, full stop, than they get on Apple's iWhatever devices.

And finally, consider this point: Game developers have been making games that can work on a variety of resolutions for years. It's not as big a deal as people make out

Are you a developer? And I'm not asking that to sound condescending either. It just doesn't sound like you are. To develop an app for all Android devices does take longer than to develop for all of iPhone OS devices. Almost all developers that I've dealt with who develop on both platforms have said this. And they also say, as well as other customers, that the Android Market isn't as easy to purchase apps from as iTunes is. Yes, I know that the two are similar in design and that the Android Market is easier to get approval to get apps on but that wasn't my point

asdavis10 said,

Are you a developer? And I'm not asking that to sound condescending either. It just doesn't sound like you are. To develop an app for all Android devices does take longer than to develop for all of iPhone OS devices. Almost all developers that I've dealt with who develop on both platforms have said this. And they also say, as well as other customers, that the Android Market isn't as easy to purchase apps from as iTunes is. Yes, I know that the two are similar in design and that the Android Market is easier to get approval to get apps on but that wasn't my point

Whoever told you that is a liar, the Android market is very easy to purchase items from. If you want to garner a valid opinion, actually test both platforms for yourself and stop living off of second hand information passed to you by other people. I own and operate devices running both platforms, therefore I feel asking whether I am a developer is totally irrelevant, I know how both platforms run and operate.

Subject Delta said,

Whoever told you that is a liar, the Android market is very easy to purchase items from. If you want to garner a valid opinion, actually test both platforms for yourself and stop living off of second hand information passed to you by other people. I own and operate devices running both platforms, therefore I feel asking whether I am a developer is totally irrelevant, I know how both platforms run and operate.

Understanding how they run is fine. But my points came from the perspective of developers whom I've talked to, some whom I work with, who develop for both platforms and say that Android has a longer development time. I, personally, only develop for the iPhone OS so I can't, personally, speak on Android development. If the people that I speak to are in the minority then my comments hold no merit but I don't think that they are. But you're not a developer so you can only comment on it from the end user perspective which is not where I was coming from.