APNIC reaches final phase of IPv4 allocations

As we covered recently, IPv4 addresses on the internet are running out, and the transition to IPv6 is growing ever more urgent. Today, APNIC, the Regional Internet Registry charged with allocating IP addresses to the Asia-Pacific region announced that their free pool of addresses has dwindled to the final /8 block, 16,777,216 addresses in total.

This triggers the final phase of the allocation policy in the region, bringing in far more stringent controls on how ISPs are able to obtain extra addresses to use on their networks. According to the policy, the intention is to provide member ISPs a single allocation of a /22 block, 1024 addresses, from the remaining pool.

This restrictive policy also ensures that enough IPv4 space will be available to facilitate transition services, aimed at easing the move to IPv6 addressing, and ensuring customers see no disruption of service.

APNIC is actively encouraging ISPs in their region to push towards providing IPv6 connectivity to clients, and with only 1024 additional IPv4 addresses available to each ISP on top of any existing unused allocations they may have, there will be little choice but to deploy the services. APNIC report that the majority of governments in their region have IPv6 initiatives to ensure they are not left behind.

It is only a matter of time before other RIRs begin to feel the squeeze. Whilst initial predictions suggested no region would reach this phase until the summer, it appears that either panic-buying, or simply higher growth than expected is taking its toll. Owen DeLong, from Hurricane Electric, told ZDNet today that he believes "RIPE is probably next and will probably be in a few months. Counting on IPv4 for continued growth is a dead-end strategy."

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30 Comments

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My ISP is not giving out IPV6 addresses or using IPV6 tunneling. It's terrible.
I'm renting a web server which has IPV6 addresses but I'm unable to test them from home... without using dodgy services.

Boeing 787 said,
Would have been better if ipv6 was backwards capable. Dual Stack was a flawed idea.

Agreed. I never understood why we didn't just make the IPv4 address space a 32-bit block of what would have been the new larger 128-bit address space. Yes, there still would have been some reachability issues for 4to6/6to4 conversions, but at least it would have simplified the re-addressing of IPv4 devices that will now have to run dual stacks and carry completely different sets of v4 and v6 addresses for the next few years until an IPv4 ultimatum is set and we are forced to abandon it in publicly routable networks.

Boeing 787 said,
Would have been better if ipv6 was backwards capable. Dual Stack was a flawed idea.

There's little point in that though, as IPv4 is not forwards compatible

DaveLegg said,

There's little point in that though, as IPv4 is not forwards compatible

Not according to the designers of ipv6, they admit it's was a mistake.

"The lack of real backwards compatibility for IPv4 was the single critical failure," says Leslie Daigle, Chief Internet Technology Officer for the Internet Society. "There were reasons at the time for doing that…But the reality is that nobody wants to go to IPv6 unless they think they're friends are doing it, too."

Originally, IPv6 developers envisioned a scenario where end-user devices and network backbones would operate IPv4 and IPv6 side-by-side in what's called dual-stack mode.

http://www.networkworld.com/ne...09/032509-ipv6-mistake.html

So who wants to start a countdown for when the profit loving ISPs just switch to double NAT?

Ugh, get me off of AT&T pronto! *sobs*

yowan said,
My retarded ISP can still allocate IPv4 addresses for the next 5 years without needing IPv6

Aye, same with my ISP. They've stated already that they have enough IPv4 addresses after the they've been allowcated to everyone world wide. But, there will be sites starting to pop up within 5 years that are only IPv6 addressable and your ISP will have to provide you a IPv6 gateway of some sorts (6to4/4to6 etc). Its not too much of a problem as IPv6 has been designed to work like that and you'll still beable to run services yourself from your IPv6 address. The only problem for most will be finding the settings to set it up properly from the ISP and of course with 1000s of users trying to use the gateways, don't expect top speeds from it until you get a native IPv6 address/gateway from your modem/router.

As a developer who runs multiple websites, 99% of the visitors are still running ipv4. This is most likely due to region, but for some of the larger ISPs out there, this is sad they've had a number of years to adopt this technology, and still lagging behind.

DaveLegg said,
You do have a number of users running V6, I see them from time to time

Lucky you! I run a site, my ISP only provides IPv4 so I don't ever see IPv6 IPs!

SubZenit said,
Hope my ISP will stick to IPv4, because the IPv6 is so hard to remember.
/facepalm

Unfortunately, the need to support more devices on the Internet is far greater than your need to remember an IP address.

Wanyal said,

Unfortunately, the need to support more devices on the Internet is far greater than your need to remember an IP address.

Cue lolz

SubZenit said,
Hope my ISP will stick to IPv4, because the IPv6 is so hard to remember.
/facepalm

there was a RFC made as an april fools joke a few years ago about converting an ipv6 address into a form which uses all the alphabets (not just A - F ) and is shorter... sounds like a pretty good idea to me, i wish they took it abit more seriously

carmatic said,

there was a RFC made as an april fools joke a few years ago about converting an ipv6 address into a form which uses all the alphabets (not just A - F ) and is shorter... sounds like a pretty good idea to me, i wish they took it abit more seriously

IPv6 allows for rDNS setup by the end user (delegated IPv6) - so if you have a domain name or even one of the many free dyndns services from such as afraid.org you can have a complete custom hostname for your IPv6 address. I really don't know how easier it can be to remember your IPv6 address then that.

First of all, ISP's need to adopt ipv6 support around the world while still default on v4, and right now that's not the case. It will be a long trip to v6 global usage.

RvXtm said,
First of all, ISP's need to adopt ipv6 support around the world while still default on v4

First off Microsoft need to fix their IPv6 DHCP client to not crash non stop taking down the svchost.exe which by default is also running Windows Audio amoungst other things and taking them down with it.

If the mainstream OS knocks out everyones soundcard every hour it will make for a fair bit of screaming from users. Also network issues will happen as clients wont have a functioning DHCP client.

Microsoft need to fix urgently

bits said,
First off Microsoft need to fix their IPv6 DHCP client to not crash non stop taking down the svchost.exe which by default is also running Windows Audio amoungst other things and taking them down with it.

Or you can just fix it yourself. I haven't experienced this particular issue but I've had another 3rd party service go wonky before.

sc config dhcp type= own

That'll tell the DHCP service to run in its own instance.

Jen Smith said,

That'll tell the DHCP service to run in its own instance.

I know the trick but it doesnt fix the fact the mainstream OS has this bug and also it doesnt fix the broken DHCP client at all. It just crashes by itself.