Apple: New iPad runs "well within our thermal specifications"

Earlier today, reports started to come in from some users of Apple's new iPad, claiming that the tablet was getting hotter than the iPad 2 when being used. For its part, Apple sent a statement to AllThingsD.com claiming that new iPad runs "well within our thermal specifications." but would not give any details.

Now the well known products testing organization Consumer Reports has posted a story, claiming that its own tests show that the new iPad can get "significantly hotter" than the iPad 2 when it runs high end games.

The group tested the new iPad and iPad 2 running Epic Games' hit iOS title Infinity Blade II while it was plugged into a power source. According to the article, the new iPad's temperature went up to 116 degrees Fahrenheit while running the game for 45 minutes with WiFi on. That's 13 degrees hotter than the iPad 2 under the same conditions.

Running the game unplugged, the new iPad got up to to just 113 degrees, which is still hotter than the iPad 2. The report also claims that while running Infinity Blade II, the new iPad didn't charge its battery when it was plugged in. In fact it actually drained the battery while plugged in to play the game.

Previous reports from users have said the new iPad gets hot even while running less intensive tasks like checking their Facebook account. Consumer Report's article did not focus on those applications.

Image via Consumer Reports

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when you actually stop and think about it, of course its gonna run higher temperatures than previous ones, it has more gpu processing ability with the same thermal management solution, more heat generated with the same cooling will increase ambient temps of the whole unit over time. the heat generated obviously is going to be higher when gaming or other processes that fully use the improved graphics core, as it will be under load....like duh. Theres no major escape for the generated heat therefore will heat up the metal chassis exactly the same with any technology related to GPUs without active cooling........

I don't get it, ppl really love to complain about anything do they...
Mine heats up slightly yes, nothing unbearable about it, and it's still colder than an iphone that had its GPS running for an hour xD

Arkos Reed said,
I don't get it, ppl really love to complain about anything do they...
Mine heats up slightly yes, nothing unbearable about it, and it's still colder than an iphone that had its GPS running for an hour xD

New Apple product, new sensationalist reports. I remember when the iPhone 3GS was released, there were reports of excessive heating, to the point that someone claimed that theirs was deformed from the heat. With that, a few people here said that was going to happen to all of them. I am happy to report that my 3GS had survived the sun under the beach at Punta Cana, as well as the desert sunlight in Abu Dhabi. It's still running like a champ today (though, my fiancé owns it now).

I'm definitely not an Apply fanboy - this iPad is my first Apple product in a long time (I own PC computers and an Android phone) - but I've had zero issues with my iPad even feeling warm doing day to day tasks, let alone hot. I can't imagine it heating up to "check facebook" - that sounds like a defective unit.

As far as the infinity blade test, a few thoughts:

- Of course this will run hotter than iPad 2 under a gaming load. Bigger battery, 4 GPU cores vs. 2, and twice the RAM, all in *basically* the same amount of space. The question is not "does it run hotter than iPad 2" - it is, "is it too hot?"

- My answer to that is, probably not. The case is basically a giant heat sink, and 113F / 45C doesn't seem that excessive to me for running an intensive 3D game for extended periods of time.

- As far as the charging issue, it really is very simple. Running an intense 3D game, the iPad draws as much power as the charger provides, hence the battery doesn't charge. This is an easy fix - a higher wattage charger. Apply would probably do well to offer that as an option, though personally, I'd rather take the small, light, travel-friendly charger. After all, tablets are mobile devices, not laptops - they aren't really designed to be used plugged in. The common use case is use unplugged, and charged at night like cell phones.

Julius Caro said,
since when do we use Fahrenheit to measure electronic components temperatures?

Since it makes for a higher number in headlines and graphics to shock people.

GS:mac

[quote=Glassed Silver said,]
Since it makes for a higher number in headlines and graphics to shock people.

GS:mac[/quote

Always remember the rule - Celsius for cold (shivering in -10 winter!!!) and Fahrenheit for warm (100 degrees SCORCHER!!!!)

[quote=Glassed Silver said,]
Since it makes for a higher number in headlines and graphics to shock people.

GS:mac[/quote

Always remember the rule - Celsius for cold (shivering in -10 winter!!!) and Fahrenheit for warm (100 degrees SCORCHER!!!!)

Wow, the GPU gets dramatically upgraded and the resolution doubled, and it runs hotter! Who would have thunk it?
Considering the specs inside the thing and the fact that it doesn't have any fans or cooling vents, I think it's pretty remarkable that it's able to accomplish the resolution and performance it offers.

Astra.Xtreme said,
Wow, the GPU gets dramatically upgraded and the resolution doubled, and it runs hotter! Who would have thunk it?
Considering the specs inside the thing and the fact that it doesn't have any fans or cooling vents, I think it's pretty remarkable that it's able to accomplish the resolution and performance it offers.

Even if I'm not an Apple fan, I must agree with you - Let's be honest, the chunk got a way much better graphic and stuff, without any cooling vent, IMO the temperatures are just fine, although some people might find it hot due to the weather warming, and stuff...

Astra.Xtreme said,
Wow, the GPU gets dramatically upgraded and the resolution doubled, and it runs hotter! Who would have thunk it?
Considering the specs inside the thing and the fact that it doesn't have any fans or cooling vents, I think it's pretty remarkable that it's able to accomplish the resolution and performance it offers.

What does 'thunk' mean?

Cøi said,

What does 'thunk' mean?

It's a sarcastic phrase that matched the tone of my response pretty well. Some comedian used to say it way back in the day. The proper word would have been "guessed" instead of "thunk", but I figured it was worth throwing some fun into it.

i think it is because in March, the weather is still cold. so apple wanted to do a favor to people who use it outside a heated room.

I can only attest for myself, but my new iPad doesn't get anywhere near as hot as my HP netbook, and the iPad is carrying a much heavier load (Infinity Blade, for instance). I think folks are just looking for a story.

Shall have to wait and see if the heat causes any issues.

I do find it odd that Apple made their iPad thicker and heavier just to toss in a quad core processor and other upgrades that many Mac fans claim, the iPad doesnt need.

techbeck said,
Shall have to wait and see if the heat causes any issues.

I do find it odd that Apple made their iPad thicker and heavier just to toss in a quad core processor and other upgrades that many Mac fans claim, the iPad doesnt need.

But.... (dual, quad, hexa) core sells.

Company: "Buy our new QUADCORE xyz"
Consumer: $___$

techbeck said,
Shall have to wait and see if the heat causes any issues.

I do find it odd that Apple made their iPad thicker and heavier just to toss in a quad core processor and other upgrades that many Mac fans claim, the iPad doesnt need.

The quad core is just the GPU. The CPU is still the same dual core 1Ghz.

Basically it's the GPU and display backlight that required the extra battery, both required for the resolution increase.

techbeck said,
Shall have to wait and see if the heat causes any issues.

I do find it odd that Apple made their iPad thicker and heavier just to toss in a quad core processor and other upgrades that many Mac fans claim, the iPad doesnt need.

It's thicker because of the massive upgrade to the battery which is needed to power LTE and the retina display

Stetson said,

The quad core is just the GPU. The CPU is still the same dual core 1Ghz.

Basically it's the GPU and display backlight that required the extra battery, both required for the resolution increase.


And LTE Radio if you have it.

Well the heat is also an upgrade.... last I check laptops of 2005 generate more heat than todays laptop... and apple thinks its okay to downgrade convenience well they trust their tards they will buy it and claim its a feature to keep them warm at night.

benalvino said,
Well the heat is also an upgrade.... last I check laptops of 2005 generate more heat than todays laptop... and apple thinks its okay to downgrade convenience well they trust their tards they will buy it and claim its a feature to keep them warm at night.

But then it would've made more sense to release it at the beginning of winter, not at the end.

benalvino said,
Well the heat is also an upgrade.... last I check laptops of 2005 generate more heat than todays laptop... and apple thinks its okay to downgrade convenience well they trust their tards they will buy it and claim its a feature to keep them warm at night.
I think what you meant to say is that Apple researched, discovered, created, and innovated this feature called "heat". Gets yours now! They're selling like hot cakes! ......eh.....get it? "Hot cakes"? Heat? Yeah that's good.

Matthew_Thepc said,
soo, ummm...does anyone know what their thermal specifications *are*?

Yes, they wait till a few of them catch on fire or explode, then recall.....

rfirth said,
I wonder how hot it gets if you leave it on your bed or in some kind of insulator.
You'd have to be running it too, preferably a CPU intensive game, then I'm sure you'd notice the heat.

I've had no issue with mine.

This is the standard release cycle for an Apple product: People buy the device and 3 days later find something to complain about. These complaints get national attention for 2 days and then we all forget it happened.

bangbang023 said,
I've had no issue with mine.

This is the standard release cycle for an Apple product: People buy the device and 3 days later find something to complain about. These complaints get national attention for 2 days and then we all forget it happened.

Not everything. That little antenna screw up was and is still well known and proven to be an issue. To many people had problems to it just be a few bad devices.

So let me get this straight... "The New iPad runs well within the guidelines that we wrote ourselves".

Good one Apple

Edited by John S., Mar 21 2012, 2:20am :

TCLN Ryster said,
So let me get this straight... "The New iPad runs well within the guidelines that we wrote ourselves".
Good one Apple

The new iPad comes with cold weather protection built in. It's the iHeatingPad!

TCLN Ryster said,
So let me get this straight... "The New iPad runs well within the guidelines that we wrote ourselves".

Good one Apple


Which guidelines should they otherwise use? Google's for their Chromebooks? Asus?

Obviously their specs is designed for their own hardware. As with all hardware companies. No other specifications would be useful. This is just another way of saying that "Your devices aren't endangered or overheating because of this".

TCLN Ryster said,
So let me get this straight... "The New iPad runs well within the guidelines that we wrote ourselves".

Good one Apple


Please do enlighten us: What other thermal specifications do you suggest Apple follows? You can bet they based it on the guidelines Samsung, among other suppliers, gave for their parts. So what you're being told here is that your new iPad won't go up in smoke.

Good one TCLN Ryster...