Apple reorganizes stores for personal setup service

Last month we reported that Apple is phasing out physical software media in their stores, which was most likely for moving the software market over the the Mac App Store. Now Apple appears to be cutting games and some hardware from their retail stores in favor of space for employees to perform a personalized in-store setup service.

Apple launched the service in January and it has become increasingly popular for people who either aren't sure how to configure everything on their own or maybe just want a second pair of eyes watching to make sure everything is set up correctly. Jim Dalrymple of The Loop reports that the service is actually so successful and popular that Apple needs more retail space to accommodate everything they offer. Sources tell Dalrymple that in addition to this reorganization, Apple is expanding its retail division to bring in more people who can help set up new Macs.

Of course Apple is limited in the amount of retail space they have, so the plan was to remove what will most likely be least missed by consumers. Games and some hardware, such as printers, scanners, and hard drives soon will no longer be displayed, although the stores will keep a stock of these items if a customer requests it. Also, during the sale an Apple salesperson may recommend these products that are not on display so that merchandise is kept moving and awareness is brought to the customer that Apple stores carry everything you need for your Mac.

Accessories for iPhone, iPod, and iPad products will continue to be displayed as that represents a good chunk of Apple's revenue and would not be economically smart to remove them, especially when carrying those items is a specialty of the store. Games are also on the list to go, with 32 titles being removed, only leaving eight titles remaining at the stores. The distribution method however has changed with games and software to online-based forms with the likes of the Mac App Store and Steam.

Dalrymple's sources say that this retail change should be completed in about 80 percent of Apple's stores within the next few months.

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When I was waiting in an Apple store to get my iPhone replaced, I watched an Apple training group, and I thought it was a really good service. If this is an extension of that, then I support that.

So how exactly does this "service" work if the customer buys a desktop? Do they just run you through setting up a display model? If so, that's totally useless. If a customer is clueless enough to require this service, walking them through a set up won't do them any good. They'll have forgotten what you just told them by time they walk out of the store.
(I've worked with customers like this so I know.)

What you fail to see here is there is a market for this, just like any other company who offers computer services. There are us who can do it blindfolded and others who don't have a clue. This is a service which Apple makes money so they are expanding it. Even most average computer Joe's can be challenged on migrating outlook, outlook express, thunderbird email to OSX. It wasn't until recent that Microsoft released Outlook 2011 with pst import. This still sucks and requires manual importing of events in the main identity calendar inside Outlook. So yeah, there is a market for this...

Mikee4fun said,
What you fail to see here is there is a market for this, just like any other company who offers computer services. There are us who can do it blindfolded and others who don't have a clue. This is a service which Apple makes money so they are expanding it. Even most average computer Joe's can be challenged on migrating outlook, outlook express, thunderbird email to OSX. It wasn't until recent that Microsoft released Outlook 2011 with pst import. This still sucks and requires manual importing of events in the main identity calendar inside Outlook. So yeah, there is a market for this...

There are also people whose time is better spent on more profitable things and leaving the technical details of computers up to people they can pay to do that.

Trueblue711 said,
This is dumb. A Mac couldn't be more simplified in setting it up. What's next? Tutorials on how to power it on?

They have those, and my grandmother (85 now) made use of them when she got her first computer for christmas last year.

The same is true of people who have never owned devices like iPads that aren't really analogous to desktop computers. Sure, manual in the box that tells you how to setup your e-mail accounts can work, but one-on-one assistance is even more foolproof.

Why should we scorn a company that tries to make it easier for people to buy, use, and enjoy their products?

Trueblue711 said,
This is dumb. A Mac couldn't be more simplified in setting it up. What's next? Tutorials on how to power it on?

Yes, trust me and I have seen even more dumb people than this example who doesn't know anything about computers.

rakeshishere said,

Yes, trust me and I have seen even more dumb people than this example who doesn't know anything about computers.


yea, and I'm sure an auto mechanic is calling you an idiot for not knowing how to maintain your own vehicle

Is it that complicated to set up a Mac?

I bought an iMac about 2 weeks ago.. and literally, I set it on my desk, plugged the power cord in, and turned it on...

MidTxWRX said,
Is it that complicated to set up a Mac?

I bought an iMac about 2 weeks ago.. and literally, I set it on my desk, plugged the power cord in, and turned it on...

I don't think it is so much the setup but when people move from Windows to Mac people have questions like, "I use Visio for work, is there an equivalent on the Mac" or "I need Office compatibility which version would you suggest to me" or even "I'm a student who needs to keep track of works cited, is there a good application that could do the job". I'd say it is more about helping people make that transition than anything else which will hopefully drive software and hardware purchases.

MidTxWRX said,
Is it that complicated to set up a Mac?

I bought an iMac about 2 weeks ago.. and literally, I set it on my desk, plugged the power cord in, and turned it on...

LOL They say it's supposed to work OOB, but there are still many rich moms and pops who don't know squat. Besides, this is most useful for those who are moving from other OSes to Mac.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

I don't think it is so much the setup but when people move from Windows to Mac people have questions like, "I use Visio for work, is there an equivalent on the Mac" or "I need Office compatibility which version would you suggest to me" or even "I'm a student who needs to keep track of works cited, is there a good application that could do the job". I'd say it is more about helping people make that transition than anything else which will hopefully drive software and hardware purchases.

I came from Windows... and I used to talk so much chit about Mac... Its easy though. Piece of cake. But I can see what you're saying.

MidTxWRX said,
I came from Windows... and I used to talk so much chit about Mac... Its easy though. Piece of cake. But I can see what you're saying.

Hopefully the AppStore will make it a whole lot easier when it comes to bringing all the software in a central location - I know for me I've bought Omnigroup OmniGraffle Pro and OmniOutliner Pro for example. I know if the AppStore hadn't existed I probably would have not bought it or worse case scenario pirate it. The result of the AppStore is that it is so easy to purchase software and so many offer discounts to AppStore purchases the idea of piracy and risks associated with it aren't worth it in the end.