Apple to patch Evasi0n jailbreak in upcoming update

Many users got excited when they could finally jailbreak their iPhone 5 smartphones but it looks like Apple will be putting a stop to that in iOS 6.1.3. Discovered in beta 2, which was seeded to developers last week, the update patches the jailbreak and will attempt to put an end to new versions of the exploit. 

Forbes reported that David Wang of the evad3rs team tested the patch over the weekend and found that one of the five exploits that the jailbreak uses was repaired by Apple.

Wang tells me that he's analyzed the 6.1.3 beta 2 update and found that it patches at least one of the five bugs the jailbreak exploits, namely a flaw in the operating system's time zone settings. The beta update likely signals the end of using evasi0n to hack new or updated devices after the update is released to users, says Wang, who says he's still testing the patch to see which other vulnerabilities exploited by the jailbreak might no longer exist in the new operating system.

Wang predicts that iOS 6.1.3 will arrive to users in about a month, and he also says that the evad3rs team has discovered additional bugs in iOS which could lead to a new jailbreak in the future. 

If you really love your jailbreak tweaks it may be best to wait to update until a new exploit rears its head.

Source: Forbes | Image via Apple

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People don't seem to understand that, although people want a jailbreak, the 'bugs' found to create these jailbreaks are also exploits that could allow malicious code to be executed within iOS.

The reason iOS doesn't have malware like Android, is because of Apples walled-garden approach, and firmware lockdown. And also because they actively patch these exploits that are found.

It's not like Apple can just allow users to push a button that would 'root' their iDevice, and have the users be on their merry way.

Well, ok they COULD do that, but then they'd have to deal with malware, and stupid users who 'jailbroke' their phone but don't know why they did, or what consequences can come from doing so.

At least in the current scenario, Apple can wash their hands of any wrong doing by saying those who jailbroke their idevice have voided their warranties, and get no support.

Apple is a company. That is why they act like a company, and do what is in THEIR best interest.

I'd bet most users who jailbreak don't even change the root password, allowing anybody to SSH into their device and take whatever they want.

Brian Miller said,
I didn't find anything useful with jail breaking.

It's possible you weren't looking hard enough, or perhaps your use case for the device is very basic and does not require any additional functionality. Activator (customised gestures for launching apps/functionality) is very useful; for example, I can assign holding the volume down button to skip to the next song in iTunes without having to turn on the screen and tap on it, or I can assign double tapping the power button to the action of turning on the camera flash to serve as a flashlight. You can also add swipe gestures to launch the settings app, close all open apps, etc.

There are also tweaks to enable SMS time-stamping for all messages (instead of the way they are normally only tagged every few random messages), Exposé-style task managers, SBSettings drop-down to allow you to quickly enable airplane mode, change brightness, turn on/off wi-fi and screen rotation, and enhancements like ScrollingBoard that allow you to add more than 12 icons to a folder and swipe the dock to display iTunes controls, weather, additional dock icons, and so on. Obviously, there are countless enhancements beyond this.

Given the level of customisation afforded, it seems that most people would find jailbreaking at least moderately useful -- once they've explored the options available to them. For my own part, I would find it very difficult to go back to a stock device; it would seem so limited and cumbersome in comparison.

Apple,

If you want to block jailbreaking, be my guest. You will lose customers over it. If you want to win customers back, please allow us to change the themes and add the widgets. If you want to lock down OS, that is fine but at least allow us to change themes/add widgets.

I do not want icons on my screen... I want weather info on screen instead of notification pulldown.

I left iPhone 3G for Android about 2 years ago.

You have not changed since iPod came out. It is time for you to change your underwear, I mean re-design your OS for better and see if you win your customers back.

shozilla said,
Apple,

If you want to block jailbreaking, be my guest. You will lose customers over it.

99% of people don't jailbreak, so any they do lose will be squashed by the number of new users.

shozilla said,
Apple,

If you want to block jailbreaking, be my guest. You will lose customers over it. If you want to win customers back, please allow us to change the themes and add the widgets. If you want to lock down OS, that is fine but at least allow us to change themes/add widgets.

I do not want icons on my screen... I want weather info on screen instead of notification pulldown.

I left iPhone 3G for Android about 2 years ago.

You have not changed since iPod came out. It is time for you to change your underwear, I mean re-design your OS for better and see if you win your customers back.

I got sick of playing the jailbreak game. The iPhone 4 can always be jailbroken because it is a hardware exploit, not a software one. It seems when there are problems with the OS itself, Apple is slow to fix. But as soon as a jailbreak is avail, they hurry to fix.

I solved my problem very easily....I went Android and I will never go back to an iPhone. I have an iPad. That's all I will ever have until they stop supporting it.

xstex said,

99% of people don't jailbreak, so any they do lose will be squashed by the number of new users.

I don't care about how many people jailbreak or not. I don't care about Apple anyway... they have same boring design. They need to come up with better than this boring design if they want to win more customers back.

TechieXP said,

I got sick of playing the jailbreak game. The iPhone 4 can always be jailbroken because it is a hardware exploit, not a software one. It seems when there are problems with the OS itself, Apple is slow to fix. But as soon as a jailbreak is avail, they hurry to fix.

I solved my problem very easily....I went Android and I will never go back to an iPhone. I have an iPad. That's all I will ever have until they stop supporting it.

I am in same boat as you. I have Android phone and iPad... Apple has same boring design since iPod. I mean the homescreens. I plan to get Android tablet to replace iPad with in near future.

TechieXP said,
But as soon as a jailbreak is avail, they hurry to fix.

Yeah, because it's a bad thing for companies to prioritize security bugs that are being actively exploited in the wild…

shozilla said,

I don't care about how many people jailbreak or not. I don't care about Apple anyway... they have same boring design. They need to come up with better than this boring design if they want to win more customers back.

Again, they don't need to win anyone back, each iPhone increases in popularity and earns them more users. Your argument is mute.

xstex said,

Again, they don't need to win anyone back, each iPhone increases in popularity and earns them more users. Your argument is mute.

They have users who are beginners or know nothing about changes... I am one of the advanced users that like to change to something else I like instead of the default crap. I don't care if iPhone is popular or not. I don't care if Apple win the customers back or not... I am not going back unless they have something better and impress us with something new that beat Android..

I did indeed spell it wrong. However the second definition of moot is valid to my usage.

'of little or no practical value or meaning'

xstex said,
I did indeed spell it wrong. However the second definition of moot is valid to my usage.

'of little or no practical value or meaning'

It doesn't work in that context. 'Moot' in reference to an argument or discussion means 'debatable'. The second definition applies to law only and serves to emphasise the fact that the argument is still up for discussion, but at the present time is not legally relevant or valuable to pursue further. It is this usage of the word that has become twisted to mean 'not valuable' / 'invalid' in common usage, despite the fact that this is not what it conveys. Granted, the dictionary.com definition should point that out more explicitly, but it can be verified if you check other more detailed sources.

deadonthefloor said,
This whole jailbreaking thing makes me wonder why people purchase iProducts in the first place.

You're acting as if the majority of "iProducts" are jailbroken. Also, if you fail to comprehend why people buy devices different to those that you like, then the problem lies with you not others.

deadonthefloor said,
This whole jailbreaking thing makes me wonder why people purchase iProducts in the first place.

Because other companies don't lock their firmware/OS either? Forcing an underground community to 'jailbreak' those devices to get tweaks/other apps they may want.

Manish said,

I don't think the majority jailbreak their iOS device.

I'm surprised how many "average joe's" have jailbroken devices. Same with android, most I know have em rooted. Even though they don't do much with it. And most of em have no idea what iOS means, don't know the difference between OSX and Windows.

Shadowzz said,

I'm surprised how many "average joe's" have jailbroken devices. Same with android, most I know have em rooted. Even though they don't do much with it. And most of em have no idea what iOS means, don't know the difference between OSX and Windows.

That's nice but it's anecdotal. Last I checked, the real world figures place jailbroken iOS devices at around 10% whereas Cydia's peak activity suggests around 5%; in either case, it's not the majority.

Just updated my iPod to 6.1.2 or whatever the latest release was and jailbroke it, no need to go up a build and loose it. I stuck with 5.0.1 for over a year.

Thing is, these jailbreak are a serious security risk to anyone who wants to use these devices in a corporate environment. You can protect everything with passwords and codes all you want, as soon as someone has root access to your iPhone they can get everything.

What Apple should do is just simply add a switch to jailbreak your own device, forcing a full wipe when enabled (just like Sony does with their Androids for example, unlock the bootloader = data wipe).

Ambroos said,
Thing is, these jailbreak are a serious security risk to anyone who wants to use these devices in a corporate environment. You can protect everything with passwords and codes all you want, as soon as someone has root access to your iPhone they can get everything.

Correction: Devices pose a security risk, jailbreaking them doesn't make them less secure. If forensic software can image the WHOLE of an unjailbroken device then I think that pretty much shows security on said devices is zilch. If you want a 'smart phone' you have no security, just psuedo security.

n_K said,

Correction: Devices pose a security risk, jailbreaking them doesn't make them less secure. If forensic software can image the WHOLE of an unjailbroken device then I think that pretty much shows security on said devices is zilch. If you want a 'smart phone' you have no security, just psuedo security.

Not true. Ambroos is absolutely correct. Jailbreaking a phone makes it a huge security risk. If you find an iPhone with a password that isn't jailbroken, you won't be able to break into it. If you don't believe me, try it. If it's jailbroken, you have access to the file explorer and can snag every single bit of information off of it with little effort. That is the very definition of security risk.

I do agree that Apple should just give in and let jailbreaking happen, but they should set something in the software to flag that the user has done it and then offer no warranty support. I'm sure blocking the pirate repos wouldn't be difficult either. The reason it won't happen now is because getting paid apps for free is simple when you jailbreak, so it would lose Apple and it's developers a lot of money.

n_K said,

Correction: Devices pose a security risk, jailbreaking them doesn't make them less secure. If forensic software can image the WHOLE of an unjailbroken device then I think that pretty much shows security on said devices is zilch. If you want a 'smart phone' you have no security, just psuedo security.

You can't even connect to a device (it doesn't show up to a system) when encrypted.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Not true. Ambroos is absolutely correct. Jailbreaking a phone makes it a huge security risk. If you find an iPhone with a password that isn't jailbroken, you won't be able to break into it. If you don't believe me, try it. If it's jailbroken, you have access to the file explorer and can snag every single bit of information off of it with little effort. That is the very definition of security risk.

I do agree that Apple should just give in and let jailbreaking happen, but they should set something in the software to flag that the user has done it and then offer no warranty support. I'm sure blocking the pirate repos wouldn't be difficult either. The reason it won't happen now is because getting paid apps for free is simple when you jailbreak, so it would lose Apple and it's developers a lot of money.


Can be mistaken since there've been tons of jailbreaks. But wasn't there one that was done from the lockscreen?
Also wasn't the lockscreen bypassable before on iphones or ipads?
Then the whole secure if not jailbroken is kinda moot isn't it?

Shadowzz said,

Can be mistaken since there've been tons of jailbreaks. But wasn't there one that was done from the lockscreen?
Also wasn't the lockscreen bypassable before on iphones or ipads?
Then the whole secure if not jailbroken is kinda moot isn't it?

There were some weird button combinations that kind of bypassed the lock screen, but it didn't give you direct access to anything.

Xenomorph said,

You can't even connect to a device (it doesn't show up to a system) when encrypted.

Look up the forensic software and check that, afaik it DOES get fully imaged to the host forensic pc.

n_K said,

Look up the forensic software and check that, afaik it DOES get fully imaged to the host forensic pc.

Which has absolutely NOTHING dot do with the security he's talking about anyway. A jailbreak uses an exploit, and exploit is a security hole. A security hole can be used for malicious purposes far beyond the files on a single device.

HawkMan said,

Which has absolutely NOTHING dot do with the security he's talking about anyway. A jailbreak uses an exploit, and exploit is a security hole. A security hole can be used for malicious purposes far beyond the files on a single device.


Find out how the forensic software does it and implement your own version of it -> you've just defeated all attempts to keep things safe/private, all encryption keys will be dumped.

If I do update my iPad with 6.1.3, will that wipe away all traces of the jailbreak, including the Cydia store and any tweaks installed into the Settings app?

If you backup your settings (and application data) an restore that - I think it's possible some traces would be around the file system

If you do a clean restore and start your phone from scratch there are no traces left

Apple should learn to accept that people will alter and modify their devices to their needs, instead of wasting time, money and effort into a game that can never be won.

Exactly. I guess they're just trying to make it hard. It's a battle that cannot be one, software written by coders is always breakable and with every patch another two exploitable loops are opened!

Renvy said,
Apple should learn to accept that people will alter and modify their devices to their needs, instead of wasting time, money and effort into a game that can never be won.

they have to try as they have shareholders that they are accountable to. Jailbroken phones can bypass the app store meaning less revenue meaning less profit fir shareholders.

they will continue to play cat and mouse as this in itself will keep the numbers down (average Joe might get a tech savy pal to jailbreak if its a given that the next update wont break it).

Renvy said,
Apple should learn to accept that people will alter and modify their devices to their needs, instead of wasting time, money and effort into a game that can never be won.

Agreed, but will never happen.

duddit2 said,

they have to try as they have shareholders that they are accountable to. Jailbroken phones can bypass the app store meaning less revenue meaning less profit fir shareholders.

they will continue to play cat and mouse as this in itself will keep the numbers down (average Joe might get a tech savy pal to jailbreak if its a given that the next update wont break it).

Isn't almost every iphone except the 5 jailbreakable how exactly are they winning this war?

ingramator said,
software written by coders is always breakable and with every patch another two exploitable loops are opened!

Try telling that to Apple tv3 owners lol

Proof that you dont know what are you talking about. Apple's revenue model is based per app sold, something that is negated by jailbreaking.

Android revenue model is per device, they have their money secure. That's why they have never been interested in stopping piracy.

ingramator said,
Exactly. I guess they're just trying to make it hard. It's a battle that cannot be one, software written by coders is always breakable and with every patch another two exploitable loops are opened!

Where's my WP jailbreak? Or a WinRT one that doesn't use MS's own allowed tools and works after a reboot?
Iphone got jailbreaked same month it was released!