Apple's iWatch may predict heart attacks

iWatch concept

Apple's recent hires have suggested their plans to enter the healthcare industry, perhaps as part of their much anticipated wearable technology endeavours, and recent reports suggest the company may now be exploring ways to predict heart attacks.

Following the hire of THX pioneer Tomlinson Holman to lead their audio division, Apple are allegedly working on a way of studying the sound that blood vessels make, presumably from the wrist, to predict heart attacks and other health problems, SFGate report.

Similar rumours, courtesy of 9to5Mac, have suggested that iOS 8, the next version of Apple's mobile OS due later this year, will come with an app specifically monitoring health, and will utilise advanced sensors in a wearable accessory. The iWatch may be more innovative than we expect if any of this comes to light. Apple may also use the M7 motion co-processor inside the iPhone 5s, iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina Display to track movements.

Other recent health related hires include Jay Blahnik, who has previously worked on the Nike Fuelband before joining Apple last year, and Roy Raymann, a sleep expert who left Phillips in January this year. Both of these are very likely to play a key role in Apple's engineering team, which is led by veterans to the company such as Jony Ive and Bob Mansfield.

Whatever Apple are planning, it will likely cause a considerable stir in the industry, as Tim Cook has promised new product categories for some years now. We expect to see an iWatch announced later this year.

Source: SFGate | Image: Todd Hamilton

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44 Comments

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Let's face it, third time you end up in a heart attack type crisis situation you're probably gonna wish you'd used that god mode cheat after all.

Now for the "spoiler alert." Just where will the gather information be sent? Security on the Internet, both hardwired and airborne has been pathetic. Look to Facebook, Google, et al, for examples of how what one thought was personal information is now splattered all over the Internet for all to see.

There is no way to exactly predict hearth attacks, not even a Doctor can do it. Higher risk, based on conditions, habits etc. yes but not absolute certainty.

Fritzly said,
There is no way to exactly predict hearth attacks, not even a Doctor can do it. Higher risk, based on conditions, habits etc. yes but not absolute certainty.

It probably can't do more than detect an arrhythmia, at best.

rfirth said,

It probably can't do more than detect an arrhythmia, at best.

I am skeptical even about arrhythmia, it is not a Holter, which requires multiple electrodes, usually 5, to ensure accurate recordings . If it exists it it will probably work as Fitbit and similar devices

off course it will. your blood pressure will surely rise when you realize how useless it is to have a watch when you have a smart phone.

neonspark said,
you realize how useless it is to have a watch when you have a smart phone.

I don't think smart phones can generally predict heart attacks?

another month yet another rumor about apple making a watch...... yet we have no real proof, and this rumor has been going on for HOW long now? just like the apple making a tv rumor...

Lots of free publicity for them and whoever came up with that concept art. Still it might turn out to be true and the company itself might be responsible for keeping the rumor alive by regularly stoking the fire.

In theory it should, and the technology is there to do it.

However, the liability might be too much, as there are some things people can't legally opt in or opt out.

A software glitch or inaccurate reading that has the watch warning users to go to the hospital might be a lot of trouble legally.

As we get more advanced 'sensor' devices, a watch or other body jewelry device could report and warn users of a lot of problems.

This crosses the line between a consumer device and regulated medical equipment; which depending on the region/country could be a lot of hurdles for a company like Apple to enter.

Mobius Enigma said,
A software glitch or inaccurate reading that has the watch warning users to go to the hospital might be a lot of trouble legally.
I'm sure when you buy the device or use the associated software for the first time there'll be a bunch of legalese included that will amount to the buyer signing a complete waiver and promising never to hold Apple liable or sue them or risk forfeiting his soul (or something to that effect).

Well if it was a Google watch that did this, it could serve up ads for cholesterol medication as you're having a heart attack.

Enron said,
Well if it was a Google watch that did this, it could serve up ads for cholesterol medication as you're having a heart attack.

LOL

So wrong, but yet sadly too close to the truth...

Max Norris said,
The price tag will probably induce a heart attack too. /s

Then you surely need it if you are buying it

Max Norris said,
The price tag will probably induce a heart attack too. /s
That was exactly what I was gonna post too!

Max Norris said,
The price tag will probably induce a heart attack too. /s

I hope they let you try it on before you buy it then! What better proof that it works!

The design is definetly much better looking than the Samsung wearables!
I don't see much fitting on that screen tho! But good design nevertheless!

Technically, his post still stands as he referred to the design.

Personally, I'd like to see more concept art or actual mock ups for wearable watches with more tech capabilities. Not much to see as far as visuals are concerned currently.

MidnightDevil said,
The design is definetly much better looking than the Samsung wearables!
I don't see much fitting on that screen tho! But good design nevertheless!
LOL. Those are just mockups.

xankazo said,
LOL. Those are just mockups.

I referred to the "design". How come you guys don't miss the first post and miss interpret the comments?