Apple's Tim Cook takes on Windows 8 laptop/tablet model

Windows 8 will not only be released as a desktop and notebook operating system but will also be used in touch screen-based laptops. Apple has Mac OS X for its desktops and laptops but for its touch screen devices like the iPad, it has the separate iOS. Apple CEO Tim Cook seems to believe that their model is best and lightly slammed Microsoft and some PC makers for their plans to make a hybrid notebook/tablet device.

In a conference call with financial analysts today to discuss Apple's first quarter 2012 results, Cook was asked during the Q&A session about if Apple was going to try to make a hybrid laptop/tablet product, as some PC makers are going to try to do with Windows 8. Cook responded that such a device would have some unwanted "tradeoffs", adding, "You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but those aren’t going to be pleasing to the user."

Cook said that Apple had no such plans to offer a hybrid notebook/tablet product, adding, "We are not going to that party, but others might from a defensive point of view."

PC maker Lenovo has already revealed its own upcoming Windows 8-based tablet/notebook device, the IdeaPad Yoga, that is scheduled to ship in October. The screen of the Yoga is designed to swivel so that you can use it as a regular notebook with a physical keyboard. The screen can then be flipped around so you can use it as a rather large touch screen tablet.

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Apple is not going to touch this market because of OS X.

iOS is a rather 'sparse' variation of the OS X kernel and has been stripped down to get what performance they have already on the iPad.

Apple cannot shove a full desktop version of OS X onto a iPad class device, or THEY WOULD HAVE done it already. PERIOD.

The kernel and OS architecture of OS X is dated and the way Apple 'recreated' it in 1999, they hurt it by trying to get it running well on a single CPU system, let alone all the additional overhead they added in to get functionality the kernel and OS model were not designed to handle.

(Think WinME when Microsoft tried to strap FS level restore and other technologies into it without NTFS. WinME coughed up blood trying to do things the OS model and kernel were never designed to handle.)

When Microsoft previewed the ARM version of Windows 8 running Word, Excel, Firefox on an iPad 2 class ARM device, Apple did a spit take and peed themselves. There is no way OS X could do this.

The additional 'holy cow' moment for Apple was when Excel and Word were running on this ARM device smoothly and loading large spreadsheets and doing resource intensive computing on top of the full desktop version of Windows 8 on a device that was equal to an iPad 2. (Open Numbers on an iPad and load a 10mb spreadsheet, if you do not realize how vast of a contrast this is.)


If Apple can find a way to 'throw' away OS X's Application base, and move all development to iOS and expand it, they will call it OS XI, and kill off their desktop products and desktop class OS.


One thing people seem to keep skipping over is the performance difference between Windows 8 RT and Windows 8 on a tablet, when the performance is MANY times what a 'New iPad' can even get close to offering.

When people see the difference and then realize that Windows 8 is a full OS, Apple will have a problem making the iPad cute enough to keep customers.

(Right now you can flip out an iPad user by taking a WP7 and have them bring up Web sites and HTML5 performance sites, and watch the WP7 device run circles around the iPad2, New iPad. Depending on how well you know the people, they results will be mixed, but most of them ask WHY is the iPad slower, it SHOULDN'T be slower than a single core 1ghz phone. And it shouldn't, but it is...)

such an irrelevant and idiotic comparison that Cook did. I don't know how he uses toaster and fridge in his house but we use both Tablet and PC for checking emails. surf the web and playing games. PC has more power whereas tablet has more comfort. so what's wrong with combining power and comfort? I have really lost my respect to apple's leadr

*All* computing (and most telecom) devices are hybrids of a sort - explain the near-ubiquity of smartphones (regardless of what OS they are running) and their capabilities (a growing number of which move into netbook/notebook territory). The same is (naturally) true of tablets and slates - even the iPad, which does have a limited (very limited compared to Android, let alone WindowsRT or Windows 8's Consumer Preview) content-creation capability.

However, Cook is placing his bets that the gulf between content-consumption devices and content-creation devices will remain wide. (Exactly how large is the price gap between the highest-end current iPad and the lowest-end MacBook?)

The big dilemma (for Cook) is that there are devices shipping right now that fit rather neatly in that gap, and I'm not talking netbooks. There are x86-based tablets and slates (the SAMSUNG Series 7 is the most obvious). Said trickle could very well become a flood, with the launch of Ivy Bridge. Right now, they are higher-priced than an iPad; however, they cost less than a MacBook. Even more problematical (for Cook again) they run the full-tilt version of Windows (7 now, and 8 later) - not Android. Therefore, while their capabilities outstrip the iPad, the fact that their price is lower than that of Macbooks (Apple's high-end portability play) while having at least as good, if not better, capabilities (partly due to the i5 CPU, even in SB flavor, and partly due to the overlarge number of applications available for Windows 7, at price points ranging from pricey to free) could result in a classic pincer play - with Apple's computing division caught in the middle. The other problem is WindowsRT - these devices compete heads-up with iPad, and at the same price, if not less. Right off the bat it has *at least* as much content-creation capability as the iPad (due to the inclusion of OfficeRT), and we have no idea what's coming down the road as far as future WinRT apps for these devices. If WindowsRT gets any kind of traction, it could slow, if not halt altogether, the iPad sales juggernaut. And that's just Microsoft with Windows.

The Galaxy Tab/Note (in fact, *all* Android tablets and slates out there) could very well be said to be *phone OS* devices as much as the iOS devices could (what separates their capabilities is the hardware, not the OS itself) - far more than is the case with Windows 8 (or even WindowsRT); the only similarity between 8/RT and Phone are certain elements of the UI. (I took on exactly that disparaging comment in my thread "The Real Reason Behind the FUD About Windows 8" in the Microsoft Beta forum here on Neowin.) Also, have we forgotten that Internet telephony largely began *because* of Windows (pre-Skype)? And now we have such applications and apps not just for Windows (and not just Skype, either) but for Linux, Android, iOS, etc., resulting in the weird twist of Internet telephony apps for *smartphones* (including those from Skype). Non-convergence is not just a myth; it may well be the biggest myth left in not merely computing, but possibly telecommunications as a whole.

Is Cook Don Quixote, or worse Canute with his broom, attempting to sweep back high-tide before it drowns him (and turns Apple into "Applesauce")?

"You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but those aren't going to be pleasing to the user."

such an irrelevant and idiotic example. I don't know how Cook uses toaster and fridge in his house but we use both Tablet and PC for checking emails. surf the web and playing games. PC has more power whereas tablet has more comfort. so what's wrong with combining power and comfort? I really lost my respect to apple's leadr

Tim Cook is right. Think about all the hybrid/combined devices in the world that are doing well and that have endured.

derekaw said,
Tim Cook is right. Think about all the hybrid/combined devices in the world that are doing well and that have endured.

Kind of like when apple took a phone and put it in a PDA and called it the iphone? Yeah, abysmal failure.

I don't think we are ready for hybrid laptop/tablets yet. For one even the Ultrabooks are not light enough. Just imagine holding a 1.3-1.5 kg device with one hand for extended periods of time like you would with a tablet. It doesn't seem like much but you will get hand fatigue eventually.

The second problem is that no desktop applications are written to be used with touch. They have tiny buttons and with no way to zoom in like you can on iOS/Android on websites (another thing with tiny touch targets), you would most likely hit the wrong buttons and menu options all the time. And that's before you add in user interfaces that use hover and other events not available on tablets. So that dream of having your favorite programs on a tablet just isn't going to be as rosy as you think.

Terrible analogy, Timmy. Toaster and refrigerators do two different things. A tablet and laptop do similar things. They're just two different form factors.

bj55555 said,
Terrible analogy, Timmy. Toaster and refrigerators do two different things. A tablet and laptop do similar things. They're just two different form factors.

How about merging a portable dvd player and a 32 inch tv? So when you want you can turn it into a big tv to watch your dvd's on...

DomZ said,

How about merging a portable dvd player and a 32 inch tv? So when you want you can turn it into a big tv to watch your dvd's on...

What about it?

Makes sense. It's what most of the desktop users are screaming about - that the Metro interface does not suit desktop usage and Microsoft continually ignoring it and shoving Metro down everyone's throats at some point in the future, if not immediately.

I think it works great on desktops - but not as well on laptops. The desktop mouse is high precision and can be moved quickly to the corners. On a laptop, the trackpad mouse just makes it worse.

xpclient said,
shoving Metro down everyone's throats

'Shoving something down someone's throat' is your favourite phrase, isn't it? So favourite you simply can't tell anything else?

Apple, again, has the correct analysis. The imagery of converging a refrigerator and a toaster is priceless. Apple understands there IS a difference between tablets and laptops/desktops, each with its own OS. Microsoft, clearly, feels that the two totally difference form factors can share one OS.

TsarNikky said,
Apple, again, has the correct analysis. The imagery of converging a refrigerator and a toaster is priceless. Apple understands there IS a difference between tablets and laptops/desktops, each with its own OS. Microsoft, clearly, feels that the two totally difference form factors can share one OS.

Uh, no. Tablets and laptops both serve the exact same uses cases. All you're doing is changing the input method. Windows 8 allows you to tailor the UI for the input method, but you are still trying to achieve the same task--check and write email, surf the web, watch videos, etc.

Whenever Ballmer, Dell, or any other person says something negative about Apple, we hear the whining from the Apple fanboys about how it is not fair, that the competitors don't talk about how their own products are good so they need to attack Apple, blah, blah, blah.

So I guess that those same people will, to be fair, condemn Timmy for the same reasons, right?

"Cook responded that such a device would have some unwanted "tradeoffs""

Cook is entitled to his point of view on this, but it should be the consumers decision what trade-offs they want, and if only Apple or companies who thought like Apple produced computers, consumers would suddenly have much more limited choices. So thank god for Microsoft's approach on this.

you will find over a slow period of time ios and osx will be merged into the same thing, they have slowly started to do it already, so I think cooke is full of **** and maybe be a lil scared, iphone sales will get harder for them as more and more carriers are posting loses due to the fact they have to pay apple so much to carry the phone, here in Canada rogers has just posted a lose and a big part of that is apples iphone, sooner or later apple will become rim and someother copany will top the charts.

korupt_one said,
you will find over a slow period of time ios and osx will be merged into the same thing,

Do you realize that Mac OS X and iOS share a huge codebase? Just look at the documentation for APIs that exist on both. You really think Apple would implement the same APIs with the same arguments and features completely separately?

Well this might be useful or not, but comparing it to the convergence of a toaster and a fridge by Tim Cook doesn't sound too smart!

I disagree I think it exactly the right time for this convergence. Remember before the iphone the PDA and the phone where seperate. People don't want to carry around lots of devices. They want one device. I think that's whats going to happen now.

Melfster said,
People don't want to carry around lots of devices. They want one device.

In general, the less devices the better, obviously. Except when you lose the advantages certain devices have over each other as soon as you combine them. Like I wrote in my other post, I don't see anyone arguing that phones and laptops should be combined into one device. Maybe in that case the compromise that that would result in is much more obvious, but the principle of making tradeoffs is the same.

Show me a hybrid device with the battery life, size, weight and clean design of the iPad, yet with the power, extensibility, input methods, display size... of a Macbook Pro.

I'm sure some people are willing to make the compromise, but the existence of significant tradeoffs can't simply be talked away

Melfster said,
Remember before the iphone the PDA and the phone where seperate.

They had PDA/Phones (Smartphones) long before iphone. Apple just did a fantastic job of "consumerizing" the concept with a nice (at the time) touch UI.


CJEric said,

Show me a hybrid device with the battery life, size, weight and clean design of the iPad, yet with the power, extensibility, input methods, display size... of a Macbook Pro.

I'm sure some people are willing to make the compromise, but the existence of significant tradeoffs can't simply be talked away

You don't think with the next 2-3 years will have that device? Asus Transformer Type computer running Windows 8?

Enron said,

They had PDA/Phones (Smartphones) long before iphone. Apple just did a fantastic job of "consumerizing" the concept with a nice (at the time) touch UI.

Yes but the point is the stand alone PDA has very low market share now.

Melfster said,


You don't think with the next 2-3 years will have that device? Asus Transformer Type computer running Windows 8?

Definitely. This is already possible if you use very low power hardware. Look at the Samsung Slate. That's a Core i5 ULV and it's 2LBs. They can easily make a keyboard dock for it if they wanted to. Just a little bit more progress from Intel or AMD can make it even lighter, thinner, and drop the fan.

I think a tab/laptop is a great idea. I am waiting and would get one. Why carry around 2 devices? I would want the ability to remove the screen from the KB like the Asus Transformer tho.

techbeck said,
I think a tab/laptop is a great idea. I am waiting and would get one. Why carry around 2 devices? I would want the ability to remove the screen from the KB like the Asus Transformer tho.

I'm sure it will be made. Samsung made it 90% of the way but seem to have forgotten to make a keyboard dock. They made the Series 7 Slate PC with a docking connector in the right place. Then they made a desktop dock. Seriously? A ULV processor with a 12" screen and they think people would rather have a desk dock instead of a keyboard dock!?

techbeck said,
I think a tab/laptop is a great idea. I am waiting and would get one. Why carry around 2 devices?

For similar reasons that phones are separate devices and not integrated into your laptop. It all depends on what you expect from a laptop or a tablet (or a phone). Think about hardware features, looks, weight, size/display size, speed, power consumption, extensibility etc. If you want to have everything in one device it's possible that (in T.Cook's words)
"You begin to make tradeoffs to the point where what you have left at the end of the day doesn't please anyone."

CJEric said,

You begin to make tradeoffs to the point where what you have left at the end of the day doesnt please anyone

Not if it is implemented correctly. And with everything getting smaller, lighter, and more powerful, this wouldnt really be a problem.

techbeck said,

Not if it is implemented correctly. And with everything getting smaller, lighter, and more powerful, this wouldnt really be a problem.


That's why I prefaced it with "it's possible that". I mean, who knows what will be technologically possible in a few years. Right now, I personally don't see combined tablet/laptop devices as a worthwhile compromise. That Yoga-thing seems relatively ridiculous to me, for example.

...

You dont carry 2 devices, you carry the one you need. I sold my laptop when I got my iPad and I have never regretted it. I just need the iPad.

Combine a laptop and a tablet and you end up with something less than two separate devices.

derekaw said,
...

You dont carry 2 devices, you carry the one you need. I sold my laptop when I got my iPad and I have never regretted it. I just need the iPad.

Combine a laptop and a tablet and you end up with something less than two separate devices.

Yes, because no one ever needs to use both platforms for their job and would never need a full laptop system.

Sarcasm aside, your needs do not necessarily reflect those of others. There is still a lot more you can do with a laptop than you can with a tablet.

techbeck said,

Yes, because no one ever needs to use both platforms for their job and would never need a full laptop system.

Sarcasm aside, your needs do not necessarily reflect those of others. There is still a lot more you can do with a laptop than you can with a tablet.

My old Toshiba Portege' M400 is a convertible Tablet and I can assure you that it does everything my laptop did plus....... is a Tablet.
An iPad could not replace a laptop or a tablet, a real one.

"You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but those aren't going to be pleasing to the user."

What a fail attempted analogy by Cook. As an iPad owner, Windows 8 has some great potential especially this tablet/laptop model given the design is finetuned so your not touching the keys with the laptop folded as a tablet, I bet Timmy is quaking in his little boots.

JJ_ said,
"You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but those aren't going to be pleasing to the user."

What a fail attempted analogy by Cook. As an iPad owner, Windows 8 has some great potential especially this tablet/laptop model given the design is finetuned so your not touching the keys with the laptop folded as a tablet, I bet Timmy is quaking in his little boots.

Have you SEEN windows 8? I'll bet he's laughing his way to the bank.

BumbleBritches57 said,

Have you SEEN windows 8? I'll bet he's laughing his way to the bank.

Yet every version of Windows released has outsold every version of OS X Combined.

BumbleBritches57 said,

Lol, only because they're forced to use Windows, make no mistake, NO ONE likes using Windows, or any Microsoft product.

You couldn't be more wrong.

BumbleBritches57 said,

Lol, only because they're forced to use Windows, make no mistake, NO ONE likes using Windows, or any Microsoft product.

Make sure nothing else fell out of your butt just now.

EVEN WITH every windows edition release outselling osx combined, apple is STILL laughing all the way to the bank.

McKay said,

Yet every version of Windows released has outsold every version of OS X Combined.

rippleman said,
EVEN WITH every windows edition release outselling osx combined, apple is STILL laughing all the way to the bank.

True, but that has nothing to do with Mac vs PC, and everything to do with mobile devices.

rippleman said,
EVEN WITH every windows edition release outselling osx combined, apple is STILL laughing all the way to the bank.

Well, you have to accept losing in some way...

This is silly thing to say. If the windows tablet market takes off you can bet Apple is going to jump on the bandwagon. Its going to be just like apple bet on Thunderbolt and now everyone uses USB 3. You can bet that next Macs are going to be equiped with USB 3.

Whoever makes a convertible tablet with light weight, swivel, and great battery life, will get my money. The current tablet PCs are great, save for their behemoth weight which makes my arm strain when I try to carry one. Most of the weight comes from the screen, with the battery close behind.

DigiM29 said,
Whoever makes a convertible tablet with light weight, swivel, and great battery life, will get my money. The current tablet PCs are great, save for their behemoth weight which makes my arm strain when I try to carry one. Most of the weight comes from the screen, with the battery close behind.

Yeah, get an iPad, it'll solve all those issues.

BumbleBritches57 said,

Yeah, get an iPad, it'll solve all those issues.

Except the ones with a hardware keyboard, swivel, and most of my productivity apps By no means am I an iPad hater, but let's just be realistic: when did you last write a masters' thesis primarily on an iPad?

DigiM29 said,
Except the ones with a hardware keyboard, swivel, and most of my productivity apps By no means am I an iPad hater, but let's just be realistic: when did you last write a masters' thesis primarily on an iPad?

You'd be surprised how much writing I can get done on it nowadays, actually. It took me a while to get used to it, but now I can get about 50-60 words per minute down, fairly accurately. Just have to be extra careful at proof reading it.

DigiM29 said,
Except the ones with a hardware keyboard, swivel, and most of my productivity apps By no means am I an iPad hater, but let's just be realistic: when did you last write a masters' thesis primarily on an iPad?

That's what a macbook is for lawl.

THolman said,

You'd be surprised how much writing I can get done on it nowadays, actually. It took me a while to get used to it, but now I can get about 50-60 words per minute down, fairly accurately. Just have to be extra careful at proof reading it.

I hope this is a joke. Why go through all that trouble just to use a silly tablet?

BumbleBritches57 said,

Yeah, get an iPad, it'll solve all those issues.

When did Apple add handwriting recognition?
It seems I missed it.......

THolman said,

You'd be surprised how much writing I can get done on it nowadays, actually. It took me a while to get used to it, but now I can get about 50-60 words per minute down, fairly accurately. Just have to be extra careful at proof reading it.

Yet using a digitizer class screen and a pen you could get more done with handwriting faster than you type, or have comprehensive dictation class voice recognition even when just in 'Slate' tablet mode that hits 99% recognition at over 100 wpm. (Windows 7 even offers this.)

With and iPad or a Slate TabletPC you can always grab an external keyboard.

As for the speeds you mention, you realize there are a LOT of people, even myself that averages 150-200wpm.

So if I was going to write a book, do you really think I would do it on my phone or an iPad, at 50wpm? That would be a massive waste of time. (Let alone the fact the keyboard on the iPad is a bit lacking compared to Windows 8 keyboard, where I can hold 100 wpm with a touch Slate screen.)

thenetavenger said,

Yet using a digitizer class screen and a pen you could get more done with handwriting faster than you type, or have comprehensive dictation class voice recognition even when just in 'Slate' tablet mode that hits 99% recognition at over 100 wpm. (Windows 7 even offers this.)

With and iPad or a Slate TabletPC you can always grab an external keyboard.

As for the speeds you mention, you realize there are a LOT of people, even myself that averages 150-200wpm.

So if I was going to write a book, do you really think I would do it on my phone or an iPad, at 50wpm? That would be a massive waste of time. (Let alone the fact the keyboard on the iPad is a bit lacking compared to Windows 8 keyboard, where I can hold 100 wpm with a touch Slate screen.)

Different people work different, I guess. Even if I could physically write 200 wpm, I don't think that I could write a story at that rate, and I definitely can't dictate it. Take notes, yeah, but not write something that other people would want to read. I just like writing on my iPad - I'm writing this on it, actually. It might just be a hassle to some people, but it works for me and I can stay comfortable on the couch. And I seriously doubt anything could recognize the crap that passes for my handwriting

THolman said,

And I seriously doubt anything could recognize the crap that passes for my handwriting

Give Windows 7 a try on a tablet. You'd be surprised.
I thought the same until I got my touchsmart tm2.

deadonthefloor said,

Give Windows 7 a try on a tablet. You'd be surprised.
I thought the same until I got my touchsmart tm2.

Very true indeed; XP had some bumpers but as soon as I got Vista handwriting recognition improved a lot and W7 got it even better; also note that I did not attend schools in the US but in Europe so my calligraphy is quite different still no issues.

The thing is, Apple *really* doesn't need to have their Tablet OS and their Desktop OS merged into one...

Microsoft, on the other hand, needs this because their business customers will need this. Arguably, Mac OS X has comparatively less business penetration than Windows and therefore there was less risk when they released the iPad because they targeted home users who had little expectations on what would run and what would not run.

Granted, Windows ARM isn't going to support much... I suspect businesses will be going towards the x86 tablets.

Shadrack said,
The thing is, Apple *really* doesn't need to have their Tablet OS and their Desktop OS merged into one...

Microsoft, on the other hand, needs this because their business customers will need this.

Close but not quite right, I think. Apple doesn't need a hybrid device because their fan base will just buy one of everything they release. Microsofts position is great because consumers don't need to buy 2 devices (or more) to get the same functionality, which equates to better value for money and less crap to carry around

If a hybrid Ultrabook like this shipped with a decent i7 and 8gb RAM, it could easily replace my existing Ultrabook, iPad and work PC. That leaves me with more money to spend on my gaming PC

Shadrack said,
The thing is, Apple *really* doesn't need to have their Tablet OS and their Desktop OS merged into one...

Microsoft, on the other hand, needs this because their business customers will need this. Arguably, Mac OS X has comparatively less business penetration than Windows and therefore there was less risk when they released the iPad because they targeted home users who had little expectations on what would run and what would not run.

Granted, Windows ARM isn't going to support much... I suspect businesses will be going towards the x86 tablets.

Business will need to have one OS for both tablets and laptops/desktops?? I doubt it. What is needed is an OS for tablets, an OS for laptops/desktops, and a powerful easy to use mechanism for the two to share/update data.

TsarNikky said,

Business will need to have one OS for both tablets and laptops/desktops?? I doubt it. What is needed is an OS for tablets, an OS for laptops/desktops, and a powerful easy to use mechanism for the two to share/update data.

Maybe it is because I have used a Convertible\Tablet since 2002 but honestly I do not see the reason to buy a tablet AND a laptop; my Tablet is a laptop PLUS a Tablet.
I do not want a netbook\tablet, I want a full featured device that replace a laptop hence my choice of a convertible Tablet and this is the reason why I never bought an iPad.
Granted the first wave had both software: not perfect characters recognition, a raw interface, and hardware: underpowered and overpriced devices issues but the software ones were solved since Vista; hardware ones were still a problem but I am confident that the next wave of 86 based devices will solve them.

It's an interesting idea, but I wouldn't want the keys to be on the reverse when its converted as a tablet. That would just feel strange in your hands.

Enron said,
It's an interesting idea, but I wouldn't want the keys to be on the reverse when its converted as a tablet. That would just feel strange in your hands.

Its like deja vu - Tablet PC concept reborn after 11 years; almost nothing new - just far cheaper this time and better touch technology.

insanelyapple said,

Its like deja vu - Tablet PC concept reborn after 11 years; almost nothing new - just far cheaper this time and better touch technology.


Also the UI and hardware capabilities so it's not a brick that only partially supports touch like windows 7.

Enron said,
It's an interesting idea, but I wouldn't want the keys to be on the reverse when its converted as a tablet. That would just feel strange in your hands.

Did you see the red tablet/netbook hybrid recently shown by Intel? That hybrid has a screen that slid upwards. I agree with you on not wanting a keyboard on the bottom, but that hybrid that was shown looked great. I think there is a market for much a device on the Windows side, but not so much on Apple's, at least not now. You ever know when Apple says it's not doing something...

A340600 said,

Did you see the red tablet/netbook hybrid recently shown by Intel? That hybrid has a screen that slid upwards. I agree with you on not wanting a keyboard on the bottom, but that hybrid that was shown looked great. I think there is a market for much a device on the Windows side, but not so much on Apple's, at least not now. You ever know when Apple says it's not doing something...

The red tablet/netbook hybrid is sweet! But it reminds me of the Acer TravelMate C200, just much slimmer, better designed and more powerful: http://crave.cnet.co.uk/laptop...rrects-tablet-pcs-49262207/

A340600 said,

Did you see the red tablet/netbook hybrid recently shown by Intel? That hybrid has a screen that slid upwards. I agree with you on not wanting a keyboard on the bottom, but that hybrid that was shown looked great. I think there is a market for much a device on the Windows side, but not so much on Apple's, at least not now. You ever know when Apple says it's not doing something...

You do realize this isn't the first time Microsoft is trying this exact concept right? It's failed once it'll probably fail again of the hardwares not up to the job... (this time can't blame the software)

DJ Dark said,
You do realize this isn't the first time Microsoft is trying this exact concept right? It's failed once it'll probably fail again of the hardwares not up to the job... (this time can't blame the software)

When TabletPC was released the touch and digitizer technology was EXPENSIVE, as the screen itself was costing builders $1500.

Screen technology is MUCH cheaper today.

However there is also a difference in screen technology, and if anyone has worked in graphic design or CAD, they will note that even stand alone digitizer class devices, without a screen are still $300 for a medium size device.

Wacom has been selling a 'screen only' version of their digitizer for years, and Apple Mac users and Windows graphic designers were buying them for $1500.

So TabletPC was an 'expensive' technology due to the screen technology, as accuracy and handwriting were important to the concept of the device.

Apple changed things by introducing a very cheap touch screen instead of a digitizer class screen, and also did this at a time when screen prices were starting to already fall. (As TabletPCs were starting to be available in the sub-$1000 range by Lenovo and HP.)

Apple even 'dismissed' the Stylus as not useful in their marketing, using their product 'weakness' as marketing trick. (Common in politics as well.)


The success of the Windows 8 Tablet is irrelevant though, as it is not a trade off product, being a full desktop OS.

When paired with existing x86 hardware from Intel that can easily fit in a small tablet now, users running a full version of Photoshop with a digitizer class screen tablet will be nice, but isn't what is paying the bills at Microsoft.

Laptop and Desktop users will still buy PCs with Windows 8, the expanded Touch and Tablet features just a bonus. OEMs will sell Windows 8 PCs, and companies and end users will buy the product even not in Tablet format. It should however spark an increase in touch screen sales, which is a good investment tip for later on this year.

DJ Dark said,
You do realize this isn't the first time Microsoft is trying this exact concept right? It's failed once it'll probably fail again of the hardwares not up to the job... (this time can't blame the software)

Microsoft failed before because it was trying to jam a "desktop" OS into a tablet. And you can't say that Microsoft will fail again, this time because of the hardware, because both software and hardware are at the stage farther than it was when Microsoft first entered, or even started, the tablet market.