Archos announces $199 Android Honeycomb tablet

Archos have just taken the wraps off their latest tablet. Going for the cheap angle, the 70b is one of the few Android tablets coming in at around $200. At $199, Archos is claiming it to be the first sub-$200 Honeycomb tablet in the world (by a small margin).

But gadget connoisseurs will know that cheap doesn't always mean better. The 70b, however, has a pretty respectable spec list even at a low price. With a 1.2GHz processor and 512MB of RAM, the Archos can hold its own against similar-priced foes. 

The 70b has its fair share of hurdles though. Honeycomb tablets haven't had the best of track records when it comes to sales, something Android 4.0 is supposed to improve on. Also, the 70b will have to go head-to-head against the Kindle Fire, which has the added advantage of the well-respected Kindle brand.

Any competition is good for consumers though, and the 70b improves in some areas where the Kindle falls short. It comes with a microphone and webcam, something which the Fire is sadly lacking. Depending on how much tablet users want to Skype, this may not be as much of a selling point, but it does give some inspiration for a Fire 2.

The full spec sheet can be found here.

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17 Comments

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The tablet market is looking a lot like the MP3 player market with 1 company defining the market with the biggest selling product and by giving the entire market a defacto product name.

Why doesnt it come with Android 4.0? The source is open, They should start making Ice Cream Sandwich based tables (Yes, I know this tablet has problably been in the making for months but Im just commenting)

Kreuger said,
Since when is 1.25ghz and 512mb respectable? Most cell phones these days are more powerful than that.

It doesn't come down to who has the highest specs. The OS ultimately is what will dictate how well it runs. And in Android's case, it has a lot of issues. Plus, the higher the clock, the worse battery life you'll get. This one doesn't say if it has a dual core or single core, but if it's single, then yeah I agree with you.

eilegz said,
this its a netbook all over again... we all know how it ended

+1 - I am selling my Sony Tablet S on ebay. I prefer my laptop. No compromises and just plain better in every area.

Just so you know, if people stop buying the "expensive" tablets and start buying up these "cheap junk" tablets, the better ones will have to come down in price. If you want an example, check out what Netbooks did to Notebook pricing.... i'll wait.

SHoTTa35 said,
Just so you know, if people stop buying the "expensive" tablets and start buying up these "cheap junk" tablets, the better ones will have to come down in price. If you want an example, check out what Netbooks did to Notebook pricing.... i'll wait.

People will and are buying them, but are expecting the quality and features of an iPad. Just look at the Kindle Fire. They are getting a massive number of returns, which is going to cause Amazon to lose a ton of money. The point of a tablet is to pack features of a laptop into the small form factor. And it can't be done on a cheap tablet.

Edited by Astra.Xtreme, Dec 21 2011, 2:30pm :

Astra.Xtreme said,

The point of a tablet is to pack features of a laptop into the small form factor.

No, not at all. That would be the point of a netbook, not a tablet.

SHoTTa35 said,
Just so you know, if people stop buying the "expensive" tablets and start buying up these "cheap junk" tablets, the better ones will have to come down in price. If you want an example, check out what Netbooks did to Notebook pricing.... i'll wait.

Good notebooks are as expensive as they've always been. Good tablets will continue to command a premium.

The question is, can you create a market of devices which are useable but otherwise unexciting / disappointing that people will buy. Netbooks proved to be mostly unusable, which is why they've basically died off. But you can always sell cheap things to people with low expectations if they work well enough.

roadwarrior said,

No, not at all. That would be the point of a netbook, not a tablet.

Technically both. But let's not get off subject please.

Astra.Xtreme said,

People will and are buying them, but are expecting the quality and features of an iPad. Just look at the Kindle Fire. They are getting a massive number of returns, which is going to cause Amazon to lose a ton of money. The point of a tablet is to pack features of a laptop into the small form factor. And it can't be done on a cheap tablet.


Kindle fire has many limitations that make it quite different than an android tablet. It is a locked up Android based tablet with limited abilities and requires WiFi to do many things like play movies. It is probably the least secure device I have ever known of as well. You can't really compare the kindle fire to other low priced tablets.

threetonesun said,

Good notebooks are as expensive as they've always been. Good tablets will continue to command a premium.

The question is, can you create a market of devices which are useable but otherwise unexciting / disappointing that people will buy. Netbooks proved to be mostly unusable, which is why they've basically died off. But you can always sell cheap things to people with low expectations if they work well enough.

As for good laptops being as pricy as they have been, that's not true. I've seen several good Core i3 laptops for $400-$500. A few for less. That wasn't even on Black Friday. It was a week or so ago. Good tablets have already come down compared to where they were a few months ago. With better cheap tablets coming out, they'll have to drop a little more. Tablets are playthings for most people, anyway. They don't want to spend a lot of money. Period.

Every time Archos releases a new device, I get my hopes up, but every review of their Android devices is a major letdown. They always seem to have one or two great features, but always skimp on something else that makes it a deal breaker. The 32 would be a nice iPod touch competitor, except the resolution of the screen and camera falls FAR behind. The 28 is too small (and low powered) to even consider for anyone other than a child (although I have considered getting one for my son's 6th birthday).