Asus Eee Box - First Look

As a brand name, Eee is a phenomenon. Scarily reminiscent of a console counterpart with which it rhymes, the Nintendo Wii, Asus' new Eee Box range has as much potential in the desktop sector. Of course I'm not saying Eee PCs of any variety will ever sell as much as Nintendo's vaunted little console, but the brand-name is incredibly easy to remember and can be an acronym for a multitude of things.

Like its mobile predecessors (the Asus Eee PC-901 or Eee PC-1000, to name but two) had a huge impact on notebooks, the Eee Box looks set to take the desktop market by storm. Frankly, we wouldn't be surprised if it makes a larger splash than Apple's Mac Mini did in its day.

View: The Review @ Trusted Reviews

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Thats a nice review and all, but where the hell are the linux versions they promised? I been holding off to buy the xp version because i don't see the point in spending $50 bucks extra if i am going to remove xp anyways. These machines are nice to leave running with apps, file server, a light media center, etc... round the clock, just like _dandy_ said. Once they finally bring out the linux versions, hopefully soon i will definetely grab one of them.

Where are the Linux versions?

TechTree interview on July 25th, 2008

TechTree: States like Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka promote the Linux operating system in its education and government sectors. Will ASUS roll out Linux alternatives for the new 904HD and 1000H models in India?
Benson Lin: Currently, we're closely tied up with Microsoft and the EEE PC with Windows XP would be available to the Indian market. However, the Linux alternative would be a possibility based on specific grounds.
Seems that ASUS is "tied up with Microsoft". Does that mean some sort of partnership deal? I don't know.

But don't hold your breath. That would be my advice.

"First look"? I've had mine for nearly a month...

Pretty cool little box. My primary interest in it was the fact that it's dead quiet--I can leave it on 24/7 in my bedroom and I don't hear it. I blew away XP Home the day I got it (including that bastardized quick boot Linux partition I have no use for), and installed Server 2003--there's not a single piece of hardware that 2003 didn't recognize.

It's got plenty of power as a download box, file server, media server, IIS machine, SQL Server, etc--functions that I no longer have to burden my main box with. As I will soon need to tinker with Active Directory for work, I'll also eventually turn it into a domain controller. You don't need a terribly fast machine for any of those tasks, and the EEE box is more than capable.

I already have older (but still more powerful) hardware laying around that would've been suited for those tasks as well, but they all suck up a lot more power, run hotter and are noisier. I stuck the EEE in a corner (mounted it behind a monitor, in fact) and I never physically see it--I can do all I need from it through Remote Desktop.

I don't see the real point of these. Maybe as internet stations at cafe's where room is limited, but for real machines, they are more expensive and perform much worse.

You can build a Pentium e2xxx series dual core with 2GB of RAM, 160GB HD for almost $50-75 less and have much faster performance


Its not like the laptop counterparts where they are tiny, thus can be brought to class etc. If the price were $199 or $249, it would be much better

I really don't get the appeal of them either. Other than the size, these are seriously limited systems. You can buy a much faster and better equipped eMachine at Walmart for $298.

Besides that, the name reminds me of my dad because EEE is his initials (LOL, yeah, my grandparents had a bad sense of humor).

Not everyone is a power user and hooked on having the latest and greatest. This is more than the average user will need for the majority of their time.

(Foub said @ #3.3)
Not everyone is a power user and hooked on having the latest and greatest. This is more than the average user will need for the majority of their time.

And just how is the "average user" supposed to load software from a CD or DVD on this machine, since it has no CD or DVD drive? Most people do still buy software in that format, and some software is simply not available any other way.

We just got one of these at work to test. It is a pretty slick little device. We got the black version, which is a piano black finish. Down side is it picks up fingerprints very easily.

The Express Gate is quick and easy to use for fast access to the internet. One thing to note, don't expect to do any streaming video via this method. We went to Hulu, and the video/audio was stuttering. However, when loaded into XP itself, the online video streaming was fine.

All in all, we are very pleased with the little unit. We are considering of purchasing a few more to use as workstations, replacing the need of hte mini-towers that are taking up deskspace.

(Drugar said @ #1)
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The Express Gate is quick and easy to use for fast access to the internet. One thing to note, don't expect to do any streaming video via this method. We went to Hulu, and the video/audio was stuttering. However, when loaded into XP itself, the online video streaming was fine.
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I wonder if that is because in that mode, the mini-Linux environment has to use generic "safe mode" type of video driver like basic VESA, or of there are other reasons (amount of RAM allowed or such). It would be fun to boot into that mode and poke around a shell prompt and get some info on CPU/memory usage and such.