AVG update sends computers into limbo

On Wednesday night AVG pushed an update for its popular anti-virus product, however instead of enhancing and correcting bugs for the program, it left 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Vista inoperable.

The update (3292) when applied, asks users to reboot their computers, and upon loading up Windows again, the victims are confronted with the dreaded Blue Screen of Death (BSoD). Even in Safe Mode the same scenario plays out, preventing users from gaining the ability to restore their systems without using a Windows install DVD.

Users have retaliated against AVG on the company's forums, and are simply wondering how something of this magnitude slip by quality control. One user tracked it to the failed loading of a file, "\Windows\System 32\DRIVERS\AVGIDSEH.SYS," causing computers to get stuck in a reboot-loop. Those without the ability to use a System Restore point, from either not keeping them or not having the Windows installation DVD are finding that they need to reinstall.

Both versions of AVG are affected, free and subscription-based. While initially AVG moderators were more concerned about policies regarding their product than attempting to help, AVG has now updated their userbase in a blog post on what to do if you're affected, offering three points of assistance:

  • As the definitions update file was removed from the update servers, users who are running Windows 7 and have not downloaded and installed this update [3292] are ok. 
  • Users who have downloaded the update, prompted for a restart, but did not apply the restart yet are advised to manually delete the avgrs[x|a].exe and avgchsv[x|a].exe file from the system.
  • Users who have downloaded the update and applied the system restart should follow the instructions provided on our website: http://forums.avg.com/ww-en/avg-free-forum?sec=thread&act=show&id=129987#post_129987

Unfortunately, those who have already downloaded and installed the update can only be helped if they have the AVG Rescue CD, which the majority of users will not have off the cuff. Their best bet is attempting to get to the Repair Console via their Windows install DVD by booting to the disc and choosing "Launch Repair", to where you a restore point can be selected.

The problematic update has since been pulled, but most likely the damage will already have been done. Testing and quality control has generally been increased among the industry, but at the rate malware protection units need to be updated, some companies have had a tough time testing thoroughly before pushing an update.

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I haven't used AVG for at least a year. This is because I had a virus, which AVG didn't detect, that would turn off my Security Settings, even after I would turn them on, they would go to off again right before my eyes. Even after scanning my computer, AVG STILL did not find the virus. I had to reinstall Vista to get rid of it. I haven't used AVG since then, because I found Microsoft Security Essentials.

But I can't say that this happening surprises me, and this should have been caught during testing and never should have seen the light of the public.

I think we have a 'weeping session' going on here. AVG is, in my experience, the best of all the major
competitors. I recall many other odd updates from Norton which made things go funny. If you don't write mainstream program code, i suggest you try it. Tell me how 'easy' it is not make a mistake.
Gaining insight through the exchange of ideas is the goal here. The 'wet diaper' whine in this context adds nothing of merit.

insofaras said,
I think we have a 'weeping session' going on here. AVG is, in my experience, the best of all the major
competitors. I recall many other odd updates from Norton which made things go funny. If you don't write mainstream program code, i suggest you try it. Tell me how 'easy' it is not make a mistake.
Gaining insight through the exchange of ideas is the goal here. The 'wet diaper' whine in this context adds nothing of merit.

Shut up idiot. You're not the one who had to deal with the blue screen and the worry of losing data.

I had school projects and data on my system going back over 10 years.

Oh, I am a programmer. So I know what it means to do thorough testing. AVG failed to do so, plain the simple.

The update (3292) when applied, asks users to reboot their computers, and upon loading up Windows again, the victims are confronted with the dreaded Blue Screen of Death (BSoD).

Yup... got the victim part right lol

The problematic update has since been pulled, but most likely the damage will already have been done. Testing and quality control has generally been increased among the industry, but at the rate malware protection units need to be updated, some companies have had a tough time testing thoroughly before pushing an update.

Testing thoroughly? Wait... what? You mean no one in quality control rebooted when prompted too? That's a touch much to believe...


AV software for computers is no different then the medicine people take. There can be just as many risks using the software as there is not using it. However, for some human meds, the side effects are even more problematic than the virus itself lol.

I got the blue screen after I rebooted. I have Windows 7 64 Bit.

I was pretty sure AVG was the cause, as I didn't make any other system changes.

Luckily, I was able to system repair.

AVG is now uninstalled..and I will not use it again !

DeMo_BR said,
This just proves how much AVG sucks
Naha, just more ammo. It was "proven sucky" the day the programmer thought it up.

I am still utterly amazed at how many idiots believe that they would get something worthwhile for free. Hasn't anyone ever explained to these morons that there is no such thing as a free lunch? You ultimately pay for it somewhere. Oh that's right, these people only have 1/2 of a functioning braincell. Maybe they should just return their computers and while they are at it, turn in their drivers license too, find a little hole somewhere and rot while those of us who have at least 2 functioning brain cells continue our meager existences in a much more joyful manner.

And before the flame wars start -
1. I realize that AVG and Avast are available as commercial products (Paid versions), but a large majority of their users opt for the free version simply because it is "free".
2. I realize that Microsoft actually has a decent "free" security suite in Microsoft Security Essentials but this falls right into the no free lunch philosophy, you ultimately pay for it by your purchase of the Windows operating system upon which you run MSE. Those R&D dollars have to come from somewhere.

Me, I either use Kaspersky or NOD32. No antivirus is perfect but these seem to cause the least problems and have better detection rates with minimal false positives compared to the other major players. And, they can be gotten cheap if you know where to look.

rippleman said,
i am utterly amazed at how idiots complain about other idiots.
So I guess that makes you an idiot too, since you are amazed and all.

This kind of sucks, because I just, yesterday told a small business running the AVG Suite to upgrade to the latest for 3 computers... umm, hope they aren't affected..

I had several people I do tech support with have this problem, I could not figure out why so many people were getting the BSOD on the same day. My own pc was acting funky but never had this issue, but AVG prompted me to reboot 3 times, and I did it unknowing of this issue. My pc rebooted prompting me it recovered from a serious issue. (Which I ignore for the most part, it seems to happen every 5 months or so)

I feel really bad for the people always claiming that AVG is the best and that they even turn off system restore and backups because it protects them.

Chrono951 said,
I feel really bad for the people always claiming that AVG is the best and that they even turn off system restore and backups because it protects them.
I love these idiots, more business coming my way...


Just cleaned a laptop yesterday. Had MSE installed but disabled. He got some spyware on it, bad too, were he could not even get to the login screen.


Funny enough if the idiot had not disabled MSE it would have protected him from the start.. hahah $160 in my pocket.. idiot!!

Well I am indeed very lucky !
I bought a new notebook and on Monday was deciding between installing AVG or AVAST. I made the right decision by installing AVAST even though I had used AVG for many years..
FORGET ABOUT AVG from now on. It was good but got worst from AVG 8 version on. Now it STINKS ! Its performance now is only average.
Wake up. The company was bought over and taken over. The remaining staff may be unhappy and having a good time screwing the product.
AVG ... so long. Good bye ! Good riddance !
8 ( 8 O

First of all... you bloody complaining bunch of noobs! its a FREE product that no one forced you to install so stop complaining.

Second, Its very easy to fix without the stupid avg CD or reinstalling windows,
simply hit F8 on startup
choose "repair my computer"
goto "command promt" and rename the avg folder in program files x86 to avg.old or whatever and restart the pc.

lipe123 said,
First of all... you bloody complaining bunch of noobs! its a FREE product that no one forced you to install so stop complaining.

Second, Its very easy to fix without the stupid avg CD or reinstalling windows,
simply hit F8 on startup

choose "repair my computer"
goto "command promt" and rename the avg folder in program files x86 to avg.old or whatever and restart the pc.

I'm sure the average user will know exactly what you just said.

lipe123 said,
First of all... you bloody complaining bunch of noobs! its a FREE product that no one forced you to install so stop complaining.

Second, Its very easy to fix without the stupid avg CD or reinstalling windows,
simply hit F8 on startup
choose "repair my computer"
goto "command promt" and rename the avg folder in program files x86 to avg.old or whatever and restart the pc.

Did you read the article?

Both versions of AVG are affected, free and SUBSCRIPTION-based

homeboy rocketshoulders said,
Wow. How is this even remotely acceptable? I switched to MSE a while back and boy am I glad I did.

I like MSE too.

AVG have made a big mistake this time, no escaping it. I think you would be kidding yourselves to say that MSE will never have a problem causing the system to fail to reboot. All software products are designed,written and tested by people, which allows room for error. In house procedures should stop these kind of errors at the testing phase. Perhaps there was some incomplete testing and if so I'm sure some heads at AVG are already on the chopping block.

Having said this, I have been a fan and user, both personal and businesses, of AVG for the last 5 years, on xp x32, Vista x32&x64, Win 7 x32&x64, Linux. I don't find it intrusive or a resource hog. Since Vista, I have not used the firewall component and perhaps this has saved me. Overall, AVG has been a very good product for me, and one that I really trust to find ALL viruses and other malware, including trojans. I'm looking at MSE but at this time, I don't have that level of trust yet - maybe later.

To those who have have this current problem, I wish you and your computer a speedy recovery.

Everyone has their opinion and favorite, I believe the winning combo is Aivra Real Time Protection combined with malwarebytes. Theses two products have never failed at cleaning any machine I have worked on in the last 3 years. Avg was dead 10 years ago from all my testing anyways even though they do have a slick easy interface now.

solardog said,
Well if your PC is in limbo then so are the viruses, duh.
Yeah good , not like we need more bots sending spam using grandmas decade old POS desktop.

Once again, here we are with a similar story...

1) This is why it is a BAD idea to run AntiVirus/Spyware software that injects itself into areas of the OS that it has no business touching, EVER.

2) With Vista and Win7, Microsoft introduced and exposed a complete set of APIs to work in the I/O and various other stacks like the Network just because of crap like this, and yet we still find companies that don't use them or use them properly.

3) When software like this overrides OS operations, when it fails, it can make the OS fail, as the software is essentially 'breaking' the OS and replacing what the OS does with its own crap.

4) In addition to massive problems like this, by injecting itself into the OS, software like this also impacts performance on many levels and can even turn off Vista/Win7 features and even cause restrticted network functionally.

5) Software injecting itself in the OS at these lower levels can also be the root of many crashes and stability issues that users blame on other software or Windows itself.

Microsoft had one heck of a fight with Symantec and McAfee and several other companies over this issue when Vista was being released because they wanted to fully lock out software from low level injecting/integration into the OS. Microsoft gave up the battle with legal actions being taken and even the EU looking at the issue. (Which is also when Microsoft purchased the detection technologies that are in MSE and Forefront.)

In Vista and Win7, the File and Network I/O is more important to not monkey with, as there are new technologies that not only deal with all the new smart caching and prediction, but can also affect how the search indexing system works. And when you use Antivirus software that is filtering this it will screw with the caching performance and even slow performance for basic background operations that should not be scanned everytime a file is touched like when the OS is updating the search index.

There are also other things that crap software like this will turn off or negate performance enhancement features Vista and Win7. Even little things like decompression of JPEG and other compressed content that gets handed to the GPU that won't function properly when 3rd Party Software is messing with I/O operations. So in addtion to the normal performance 'hit', you are losing the extra speend that Win7 and Vista bring to the table via new technologies in how the WDDM works.

And if you aren't completely sure how intrusive the software you are using is and can't find a clear answer, just go grab Microsoft Security Essentials, it is completely free, always will be free, and interfaces with Vista and Win7 properly via upper level APIs, as Microsoft designed the OS to work.

Why o why do these companies not have some sort of internal testing procedure to mitigate against these `issues`. As others have stated it wouldn`t take long to apply the update and check everything is still functioning correctly. This just smacks of gross negligence

Since I repair pcs for a living, I love AVG. Their constant crud like this brings me a lot of business. But I would NEVER recommend it to a client for any reason..

ozyborn said,
Since I repair pcs for a living, I love AVG. Their constant crud like this brings me a lot of business. But I would NEVER recommend it to a client for any reason..

Good job the Win 7 machine I installed AVG on 3 days ago was 32 bit Although I haven't turned it on for a few days so the update wouldn't have affected it anyway.

I have Win 7 x64 and got that little update last night.....boy was i $^%(ed when i got the reboot loop of death. lucky for me i had a restore point that i could go back to. Found that you have to do a system restore point and not an install restore point to get it to work though. I have since ditched AVG and gone to MSE. Seems to be faster anyway.

Yeah, luckily I switched to MSE as soon as it came out. It's great, and I have faith that MS would never push an AV update that rendered their own OS unusable.

wow that is some crap i have to tell my brother not to update and to switch to something else what is a good free version im using mcafee beta only cause im in the beta program but what would be a good free one to switch to

xrandallx said,
wow that is some crap i have to tell my brother not to update and to switch to something else what is a good free version im using mcafee beta only cause im in the beta program but what would be a good free one to switch to

Avast or MSE.

warwagon said,

or MSE.

MSE is good if you have a genuine copy, but a machine I fixed recently had a non-genuine copy of Windows 7, and because MSE disables itself when it detects this, the machine got infested with viruses/malware. That's very poor decision from Microsoft. Yes, someone had obviously downloaded 7, but still, to disable the security software and leave the system open to attack, is just going too far.

Flawed said,

MSE is good if you have a genuine copy, but a machine I fixed recently had a non-genuine copy of Windows 7, and because MSE disables itself when it detects this, the machine got infested with viruses/malware. That's very poor decision from Microsoft. Yes, someone had obviously downloaded 7, but still, to disable the security software and leave the system open to attack, is just going too far.
Daz ftw.

Flawed said,

MSE is good if you have a genuine copy, but a machine I fixed recently had a non-genuine copy of Windows 7, and because MSE disables itself when it detects this, the machine got infested with viruses/malware. That's very poor decision from Microsoft. Yes, someone had obviously downloaded 7, but still, to disable the security software and leave the system open to attack, is just going too far.

Nope it is a fair punishment. If they want to steal Windows then they can buy Norton (laugh). Otherwise they can legally buy Windows and be secure...

Microsoft isn't a 501c(3) (Charity)

Frazell Thomas said,

Nope it is a fair punishment. If they want to steal Windows then they can buy Norton (laugh). Otherwise they can legally buy Windows and be secure...

Microsoft isn't a 501c(3) (Charity)


On the other hand - Microsoft is spending a lot of resources to combat botnets, many of which are running pirated copies of Windows, and thus get less protected. This is not only costly to fix for MS, it also gives Microsoft bad publicity for providing the platforms for the majority of the botnets out there, which are spamming us all.

Is it still a good punishment?

Northgrove said,

On the other hand - Microsoft is spending a lot of resources to combat botnets, many of which are running pirated copies of Windows, and thus get less protected. This is not only costly to fix for MS, it also gives Microsoft bad publicity for providing the platforms for the majority of the botnets out there, which are spamming us all.

Is it still a good punishment?

It is only because there is not proper balance for them at their size. If they give the pirated copies all the perks and benefits of a legal copy they won't make a dent among those who unsuspectingly ended up with pirated copies of Windows or the subset of pirates who may actually purchase legally.

They have to work hard to let people know their copy is pirated (in case they were unsuspectingly sold a copy, such as by a local comp repair guy/store) and to pull the pirates on the fringe back to legality.

So they are damned if they do and damned if they don't. I still think it is a fair punishment in that Microsoft has no duty to keep non-customers happy and safe. They have no duty to the public at large (legally, sometimes helping the common good is in their best business interest).

Northgrove said,

On the other hand - Microsoft is spending a lot of resources to combat botnets, many of which are running pirated copies of Windows, and thus get less protected. This is not only costly to fix for MS, it also gives Microsoft bad publicity for providing the platforms for the majority of the botnets out there, which are spamming us all.

Is it still a good punishment?

Ok, this whole debate shows that people have very little understanding on this issue.

People don't realize or are forgetting:

1) The firewall in Win7 is already in place, and would prevent the machine from becoming a bot 99.9% of the time.

2) Defender - the built-in Anti-Spyware is also built into the system even if it is not a legal copy, and it again will nail 99% of the crap a user would encounter.

3) MS Update Malicious Software Tool - Again even if the copy of Windows is not legal, this still runs when updates are processed, and it is essentially a quick scan version of MSE that even includes the database information on how to not only remove malicious software but fix the problems that it caused to the OS. (You can even download the monthly updated version of this software manually and NO Genuine or WGA checks are needed.)

---

So if you are suggesting that Microsoft is putting the users and the 'world' at risk, you very mistaken on this issue and some re-education of what a validated install of Windows allows and doesn't allow.

Frazell Thomas said,

They have to work hard to let people know their copy is pirated (in case they were unsuspectingly sold a copy, such as by a local comp repair guy/store) and to pull the pirates on the fringe back to legality.

Well Microsoft certainly achieved that goal, for the system was effectively unusable due to all the malware/viruses running on it after MSE decided to disable itself and stop protecting the system. Although if I had it my way I would install Ubuntu on it for them instead, but unfortunately, they need Windows.

Frazell Thomas said,

So they are damned if they do and damned if they don't. I still think it is a fair punishment in that Microsoft has no duty to keep non-customers happy and safe.

I'm sorry, but I don't agree with that. Why purposefully leave a system unprotected? In the end, as Northgrove said, taking this kind of action only helps propagate viruses/malware/botnets.
Frazell Thomas said,

They have no duty to the public at large (legally, sometimes helping the common good is in their best business interest).

Microsoft never does anything unless it pads their bottom line.

thenetavenger said,

Ok, this whole debate shows that people have very little understanding on this issue.

Even with all those things running, the system was infected after MSE disabled itself. There is no excuse for this kind of action. Microsoft is intentionally leaving systems vulnerable.

Flawed said,

Even with all those things running, the system was infected after MSE disabled itself. There is no excuse for this kind of action. Microsoft is intentionally leaving systems vulnerable.

Did you download the MS Malicious Update Tool to clean it? And instruct the person that if they want to run an illegal copy to at least do this so they are protected?

And as I stated, this does not leave the system open to be a bot, even infested the machine is only hurting the user that is running an illegal copy.

PS There is no reason to run an illegal copy, even if you have no $$. There are a lot of options from Microsoft to get a legal copy for virtually nothing.

Also if the person bought the computer not knowing the copy was illegal, MS will send them a free legal copy.

Microsoft is trying to slow down the illegal selling of software, not harm users. If they were out to harm users, the machine would essentially shutdown and not boot or work at all.

PS There are also legal reason around way MSE isn't just freely available without the WGA checks. Go look up MS Monopoly and how these restrictions tie their hands when even trying to 'include' or give away software like MSE.


MSE is good if you have a genuine copy, but a machine I fixed recently had a non-genuine copy of Windows 7, and because MSE disables itself when it detects this, the machine got infested with viruses/malware. That's very poor decision from Microsoft. Yes, someone had obviously downloaded 7, but still, to disable the security software and leave the system open to attack, is just going too far.

It can be installed on non genuine OS

Flawed said,

MSE is good if you have a genuine copy, but a machine I fixed recently had a non-genuine copy of Windows 7, and because MSE disables itself when it detects this, the machine got infested with viruses/malware. That's very poor decision from Microsoft. Yes, someone had obviously downloaded 7, but still, to disable the security software and leave the system open to attack, is just going too far.
Google Windows loader already!!

TonyLock said,
This is a MAJOR f-up.
I hate it when the company who makes the product doesn't actually use the product.

They should change the name from AVG to MFU

I'm kind of ashamed to say it, but before Avast 5 came out (which gave the new UI) and before their was MSE, I went back and gave AVG 8.0 or 8.5 another try. I was impressed by their interface. I installed it on a handful of machine. It was around the same time they had their last update ****up. When I read the news on Neowin.. i was like OH ****!!!!!!!!. I mean realistically it could have crashed every PC I installed it on.

When you guys repair peoples computer that have an issue like they and they ask what the issue was, and you tell them that AVG caused the problem, do they have a problem paying you to fix something that you installed in the first place?

warwagon said,

When you guys repair peoples computer that have an issue like they and they ask what the issue was, and you tell them that AVG caused the problem, do they have a problem paying you to fix something that you installed in the first place?

They rarely ask me what the problem was.

Gabe3 said,
eset ftw. i can't believe people still use avg, it was the av to use in 04

Actually back in 2003 /2004 when I started my repair business I was looking at which free AV was the best. I installed AVG on a few computer but was not happy on how SLOW their update servers were. They were slow as ****. So then I tried Avast, I was much happier.

warwagon said,

Actually back in 2003 /2004 when I started my repair business I was looking at which free AV was the best. I installed AVG on a few computer but was not happy on how SLOW their update servers were. They were slow as ****. So then I tried Avast, I was much happier.

yeah, I think I used avast for a bit after avg, and then after avast I used norton corporate for a couple years. and then it was nod32, then eset smart security.

Athlonite said,
well they finally figured out how to stop malware in it's tracks and all anyone can do is bi@tch & moan LOL
It's a rule to not bypass the swear filter.

ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

Digitalx said,
ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

All retail laptop/desktop now come with 64 bits!
I used to work as a retail technician, and this kind of problem just makes a week's budget right there. So much for saving on a free A/V.

Digitalx said,
ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

They take up disk space that wouldn't be necessary if these people would write their software correctly.

Digitalx said,
ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

Really? Not that bad? 64-bit is the norm for modern hardware and should have been a long time ago. New PCs generally ship with 64-bit. There's really no good reason aside from not having a 64-bit CPU or having only 1GB or RAM or less to not be running 64-bit. And it isn't that bad? I like AVG, but this blunder is inexcusable.

Digitalx said,
ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

take a look at best buy or any other retail store, most PC sold today come with 64bit windows, except the netbooks.

Digitalx said,
ah well 64 bit only so isn't that bad. not to mention restoring to last restore point isn't a bad thing should have at minimum at least one each week.

I don't use system restore, so this would have been a major annoyance for me. And I think in terms of Windows 7 x64 is the mainstream OS nowadays.

Nihilus said,

I don't use system restore, so this would have been a major annoyance for me. And I think in terms of Windows 7 x64 is the mainstream OS nowadays.

Unless you are so full on disk space that you can't spare an extra GB, there is NO REASON to not use system restore.

On Windows, there is virtually no performance penalty, as NTFS uses copy-on-write features to maintain the versioning used for system restore.

You are also losing volume level file version retention for your personal data and documents, which on Windows is called 'Previous Versions' (Similar to Time Machine on OS X, but it functions with both backups and on volume versioning created by System Restore and NTFS's copy-on-write features.)

On WinME, System Restore was crap, as the x86 kernel and FAT32 didn't have the technology for it work well and was a kludge at best. However on NT systems with NTFS, like WinXP, Vista, Win7, they do have the technology and System Restore works entirely different, is transparent and as I said, has no performance loss because of NTFS features.

So, stop reading this, and go turn System Restore back on, for the love of all that is good.

omnicoder said,
And this is why I switched to Common Sense a while back. No need for updates and I've never had any issues like this.

Where do you download that? How can it be deployed?

Odom said,

Where do you download that? How can it be deployed?

Is this a real question?


Common Sense 2011
This one's unusual in that it's free and considered by far the best protection out there, yet can't be downloaded anywhere. Without it, however, even the best security software is rendered useless.
If you haven't already figured this out, Common Sense 2011 isn't a product you can download so much as it is a state of mind. If you're going to be free of viruses and malware you need to use your head while browsing the web. The most important thing to remember is this: if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

omnicoder said,
And this is why I switched to Common Sense a while back. No need for updates and I've never had any issues like this.
Been using it since 1997 Never had a virus

omnicoder said,
And this is why I switched to Common Sense a while back. No need for updates and I've never had any issues like this.

What you mean to call it is infected 2011, I don't know it and I love being a bot on the interwebs. Some people can pull this off, but most can't. Expert knowledge is required. Most end users simply don't have this kind of knowledge or impulse control. Maybe you do, however, and I could be wrong.

In today's environment, we are talking about a locked box with very limited access to a shared network and, or the internet. No javascript, no flash, almost no third party installs and no hacks/cracks and the like. I'd stay away from adult material and any family friendly sites too.

Example scenarios:
1). I don't know how many times I stumble across genealogy sites that are infected.
2). I recently ran across a cross site scripting infection that deployed a malware install from a major cellphone carrier website (in the maps section of their site). The company had no clue, and it wasn't until many infections later that they realized the issues.
3). In my experience, most people who have a virus/rootkit... have no idea. Literally none. I just got finished recently doing a reinstall of a family members computer because they installed an update to their favorite text editor (for html design). It's a popular one. No slow down, no typical issues but they had a rootkit. The AV didn't pick it up, and only sign was that it disabled the AV.

In my experience, the only secure Windows box (and this applies to other OS as well) is on in which you own a genuine copy of Windows, No third party software unless you compile the software yourself. Even than it is hit or miss. It's a bit difficult to see issues when viewing 40,000+ lines of code. No access to USB thumb disks or CD/DVDs for anyone but the admin. No network access (period). Not locked down internet, but no access at all. No internal network access either. Finally, no Nike network access either (like stated above).

Only than can you be pretty sure that you are not infected, say 99.9%. Anything less is a role of the dice.

And we can all live our lives in a plastic bubble too.

Someone posts about using Common Sense on the web, others interestingly enough didn't catch what that meant at first, very funny...

bero 2.1 said,
Again?!
How many times does AVG need to do that mistake?!

Was just about to say this. This is becoming a regular thing for AVG...

bero 2.1 said,
Again?!
How many times does AVG need to do that mistake?!

well this was the first thing I thought after reading this article, too

bero 2.1 said,
Again?!
How many times does AVG need to do that mistake?!

Exactly. Not to mention that everyone I know that's ever used their products has ended up with a virus. Talk about a garbage company that should go away.

M_Lyons10 said,

Exactly. Not to mention that everyone I know that's ever used their products has ended up with a virus. Talk about a garbage company that should go away.

Agreed, when Avast put out a bad update i dumped em...if i had AVG i would have to..but i figured out they didnt offer any protection long ago. When i did tech support...id say 99% of the time i helped someone go from AVG to another AV, infections were found after.

bero 2.1 said,
Again?!
How many times does AVG need to do that mistake?!
First time was a mistake. This time was not.


Too bad their TOS have a line that covers their asses for breaking your computer. So nice!