Azure hit with outages, all is almost back to normal

Microsoft's cloud is having a rough month, with Azure outages hitting the service earlier this month, followed by another wide-spread outage that took some services offline today. The outage affected multiple regions and included Virtual Machines, Cloud Services and Web sites. As of the time of this posting, nearly all services are back online with only the Europe North region still having issues with websites.

Microsoft, Amazon, Google and all of the cloud providers stake their reputation on up-time for their services which means that these instances of down-time do hurt the brand. More so, when corporations are basing their applications on these cloud infrastructures, not only is it hurting Microsoft's image but their users are knocked offline and can lose money as well.

Azure is a growing business for Microsoft and is a billion-dollar business line that Satya Nadella knows quite well; he helped to build out the Azure platform. Microsoft was able to fix these issues rather quickly and nearly all users are back up and running; and even with the downtime, Azure and other cloud services typically have better reliability than on-premise deployments.

With this being the second major outage in a month, all eyes will be on Microsoft to see how they will perform over the coming weeks.

Source: Microsoft | Via: ZDnet

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14 Comments

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I just find this hilarious after a bunch of zealots on here tried spouting how much better the cloud is, how much more reliable it is, how much more secure it is, etc.

What a load of rubbish.

Quote from email from AzureTeam@email.microsoft.com:

"Upcoming maintenance from August 22 through August 24 will affect deployments of Microsoft Azure Virtual Machines and Cloud Services. "

The planed maintenance is split over different times at different hosting sites.

This outage was not part of any planned maintenance that I was notified of.

We have all the suggestions in the suggestion in said email in place, and we were still taken down.

We were also notified of a serious Maintenance window this week. Along with this came instructions on how to ensure 100% uptime of your services. Couple of clicks to set up geo replication on a must have service and job done.

As to the new interface, you're given a choice to use the original or try out the newer version.

I did laugh when I saw mainstream media picking this up asses though there were issues.

Hasn't hurt the share price.

An update is going to happen on cloud services and websites throughout Azure, has been informed to all Azure subscriptions mail id a week back. It clearly said it's expected to have these kind of issues and the update flow only goes from one fault domain to the next.

The cloud worries me

We have migrated a few key services, lync, sharepoint and recently fope (now known as eop).

Everything was going great, till microsoft decided to upgrade their systems and change a whole load of stuff, subnet ranges, dns names, portal urls, the entire management interface.

We came in one morning and was like wtf!! Luckily we only had a few hours downtime over one weekend, but we now have to learn our way around the new interface and go over and update a lot of our documentation to make sure it;s working like before.

If this was on premise, we could manage this ourselves and schedule it around our business. Know we have no choice but to do what microsoft say.

Thanks ms!

"we have no choice but to do what microsoft say"

Good morning! Thats what the cloud is all about: loss of control. I assume this wasnt highlighted on the Office365 PPT when the salesman sold it to your company... typical MS trap.

soder said,
"we have no choice but to do what microsoft say"

Good morning! Thats what the cloud is all about: loss of control. I assume this wasnt highlighted on the Office365 PPT when the salesman sold it to your company... typical MS trap.

not having the right staff (read the company refusing to pay the wages) to look after an on premise solution was the driving force behind it. The sector we're in means we get cloud solutions virtually free of charge.

That doesn't mean I have to like it :-(

Next year we are moving to Exchange 365.....you try finding us two exchange 2013 admins in our area. It's impossible unless you want to pay them £50k each

No one said you needed to go to the cloud - Like it or not the cloud is the future and on-premise exchange is going to take a back seat to Office365 in features. I would like to see how you are going to get exchange admins for 50K try 80 - 100K if you want good exchange people.

krobin said,
No one said you needed to go to the cloud - Like it or not the cloud is the future and on-premise exchange is going to take a back seat to Office365 in features. I would like to see how you are going to get exchange admins for 50K try 80 - 100K if you want good exchange people.

yep, this is the future

i would loves seeing the following, whenever available:
- court battle due azure outages
- lists of financial loss/damages due to azure outage

Torolol said,
i would loves seeing the following, whenever available:
- court battle due azure outages
- lists of financial loss/damages due to azure outage

Yeah, that totally happened with those Amazon EC2 outages.