Bitcoin gift snatched from TV anchor

Bloomberg TV anchor, Matt Miller, was robbed by a reddit user of a Bitcoin during his show's "12 days of Bitcoin" segment where he intended to gift Bitcoin certificates worth $20 each to his co-hosts.

Matt planned to gift the $20 worth of Bitcoin to each of his co-hosts during the "12 days of Bitcoin" segment on his show. However, the moment he showed them the gift certificates, the QR code containing the private key for the amount caught the eye of Reddit user NastyMan9 who simply made a post about the gaffe. However, another Reddit user milkywaymasta had already snatched the Bitcoin by scanning the QR code by then.

Although milkywaymasta offered to return the Bitcoin in his post, Matt replied to him through Reddit and urged him to keep it as a lesson to himself in security with the cryptocurrency.

With Bitcoin becoming more popular each day, users should be more careful with the currency and the transactions related to it. Recently, some Mac users were fooled into believing that the currency could be mined on their computers by a simple command which shows us that there is isn't enough awareness among the people yet.

Source: Reddit via Business Insider

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It was good of Matt Miller to say that he could keep the Bitcoin. Thank god it wasn't that much lost!

And the bit about the Mac users...I find it difficult to have sympathy for someone that doesn't do their research first. A quick Google would have shown that the commands they were being asked to type would have caused them issues.

Nick H. said,
It was good of Matt Miller to say that he could keep the Bitcoin. Thank god it wasn't that much lost!

And the bit about the Mac users...I find it difficult to have sympathy for someone that doesn't do their research first. A quick Google would have shown that the commands they were being asked to type would have caused them issues.


Yeah, I don't get that about the Mac users either...

Good lesson but I can't agree with your "sympathy" outlook. Some things are common sense and some things are still somewhat obscure. When 99% of the population aren't aware of how something works, I think we know which one it falls under.

Nick H. said,
A quick Google would have shown that the commands they were being asked to type would have caused them issues.

A quick Bing would also have sufficed.

A "quick Google" can inform you about literally anything and doesn't really change the point. No offense but you two seem like the epitome of IT type stereotypes.

Hahaiah said,
No offense but you two seem like the epitome of IT type stereotypes.

Checking the validity of information doesn't require an IT degree, especially if you're dealing with an area you don't understand well. I wouldn't try fixing my sink without checking information. The problem was that people heard about Bitcoin and didn't stop to think for a moment.
The same happened in this instance. Matt Miller had been discussing Bitcoin and wanted to provide a gift that would tie-in. He went ahead with his plan apparently without checking how Bitcoin works, and without thinking about the fact that the certificate could be taken through a medium that he works with every day.

Nick H. said,
And the bit about the Mac users...I find it difficult to have sympathy for someone that doesn't do their research first. A quick Google would have shown that the commands they were being asked to type would have caused them issues.

You're kidding right? What makes Mac users so special in this regard? The whole problem with Windows infections is that people are stupid enough to do stupid things to compromise their system in the first place. As an example, the calibre of people I see (Mostly young people) who purchase Macs buy them based on the furphies about their security, no virus', etc. With that in mind, they'll blindly do anything because #1: They know nothing about computers anyway #2: They've bought a Mac, so they can do no wrong.

Apple brought that on itself by painting itself as a fool proof system. This then extends to the lesser educated population of the Windows world, whereby they make the transition and can do major damage, under the illusion that they can't trash their computer like they can on Windows.

It's somewhat common knowledge that you shouldn't open suspicious email attachments, you don't even need to Bing it to find that out, yet it still happens and people still fall for it. It's common knowledge that Nigerian princes aren't really going to share their wealth with you in exchange for you hosting their millions for a few days, yet people fall for it. You could Bing it and find this out, you could critically evaluate the "opportunity" and then discard it, or you could be as many computer users are, and just blindly do things.

Mac, Windows, it doesn't matter. There are a class of people who can't be educated and don't give a rats, so they're going to fall for stupid things no matter what you do, because a determined fool will do what it takes to work around protections in search of the elusive goal they wish to achieve. In this case, mining Bitcoins.

The fact people still fall for "Did you know that gullibility isn't in the dictionary?" says it all.

Ideas Man said,

You're kidding right? What makes Mac users so special in this regard?

He's not talking about all Mac users. He's talking about the Mac users that were burned by the fake Bitcoin mining thing.

Hahaiah said,
Good lesson but I can't agree with your "sympathy" outlook. Some things are common sense and some things are still somewhat obscure. When 99% of the population aren't aware of how something works, I think we know which one it falls under.

This has nothing to do with technology and ignorance. It's more about stupidity and gullibility.

Not really, he snagged it before anyone else could and offered to return it. Had he NOT done that, it's likely someone else would have anyway and kept it for themselves. milkywaymasta did him a favour!

That's the thing for me. People forget their password every second of every day. People will loose their private key easily too. With no method to get it back that's a lost bank account. God knows how many millions of currency is already sat lost out there.

it's something that's generated purely out of "want" of the masses with nothing whatsoever to back it up. think of it as "popularity" quantified and valued with mathematics pulling its string.

JamesWeb said,
How can anyone consider money that can be stolen through the TV the future of currency?

A credit card number and code could be stolen through the TV too if someone were to show it.

Liana said,

A credit card number and code could be stolen through the TV too if someone were to show it.

A Microsoft employee will never ask you for your credit card number or password over the TV.

JamesWeb said,
How can anyone consider money that can be stolen through the TV the future of currency?

Because if you put up your bank details on the TV they definitely could NOT be used to steal your money, right?

Think next time.

No contact with the victim for one. It's the equivalent of leaving a nice car running in the ghetto at 2am vs getting carjacked. One was an obviously stupid thing to do with a well know high level of risk vs a violet crime that you likely had little control over. It's an obscure enough technology that up til now required a certain level of knowledge just to use. This was a good example of what happens when you don't have that. Interesting dynamic.

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