Blizzard kicked over 320,000 hackers from Battle.net

Blizzard posted an official annoucement on their forums that they have kicked over 320,000 accounts from Battle.net they found were violating the terms of service.

We’ve recently banned over 320,000 Warcraft III and Diablo II accounts that were found to be violating the Battle.net Terms of Use. If this is a first offense, the CD key associated with the banned account will be suspended for 30 days, while repeat offenders will see their keys banned permanently. All account ban decisions are final.

We would like all players to remember that abuse of unintended mechanics and/or use of third party programs is a violation of the agreement made when signing on to Battle.net, and can subject your account to disciplinary action up to and including a permanent ban of its access to the service.

Many account closures come as the direct result of tips emailed to our hacks team by legitimate Battle.net users.

This is not the first time Blizzard has done something like this. In November of 2008 they banned over 350,000 accounts from Battle.net stating, "Cheating ruins the game experience for legitimate players, and we will not tolerate it."

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ThaCrip said,
i am glad they ban cheaters as it does ruin the experience for legit players!

i honestly don't get WHY cheaters cheat unless they do it just to **** people off?


Because they're lazy

ThaCrip said,
i am glad they ban cheaters as it does ruin the experience for legit players!

i honestly don't get WHY cheaters cheat unless they do it just to **** people off?

Gives them a feeling of power over non-cheaters, I suppose. In the rare occurrence I play a game, I often try and find a public cheat for it. First, sinful human nature to want to be better than the rest. Second, if many have hacks except me, I'll feel left out.

I think it has more to do with the steaming pile of ****ty code that is MW2.

Infinity Ward should offer a refund to anyone that bought that game.

ahhell said,
I think it has more to do with the steaming pile of ****ty code that is MW2.

Infinity Ward should offer a refund to anyone that bought that game.

+1

Oh so this is only for those who cheated

Would rather they go after hackers that actually steal people's accounts, and more action on those goldsellers advertising.

aarste said,
Oh so this is only for those who cheated

Would rather they go after hackers that actually steal people's accounts, and more action on those goldsellers advertising.

If that is easier to catch, they will probably.

aarste said,
Oh so this is only for those who cheated

Would rather they go after hackers that actually steal people's accounts, and more action on those goldsellers advertising.

How can they ban hackers? they dont have an account with Blizzard, they're using other peoples accounts Blizzard has done all they can, they have a login/password system with all games going through a battle.net account which you can, if you wish.. buy an athenticator for which will stop all hacking/keygen's from gaining access to your account for all your blizzard games.

Crompee said,

How can they ban hackers? they dont have an account with Blizzard, they're using other peoples accounts Blizzard has done all they can, they have a login/password system with all games going through a battle.net account which you can, if you wish.. buy an athenticator for which will stop all hacking/keygen's from gaining access to your account for all your blizzard games.

The authenticators are vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks. While it's a highly effective measure against unauthorized account access, it isn't perfect.

They float the word 'hacker' around so easy these days.

Maybe they are naive script kiddies using an app developed by two or three other people.

Anyways, they break the rules they signed up to then good riddance.

Legit players? Oh please. Frankly most of the top players are either exploiters/hackers. Once you start its hard to go back. Say you're gaming then as a legit player never seen a hacker before then you wonder then before you know it your searching for them then some go to extents to pay for it to actually win anything worthwhile in there little life.

Now if they would just block the entire country of China.

"hi you are blizzard lucky player. please log in our site we give your horse a free celestial steed"

People like this are the reasons I stoped gaming... it seemed like every time I tried to learn a new game some cheater would take me out really fast with an exploit.... Halo comes to mind at first.... hiding in places you cant see them then head shot outa no where....

neufuse said,
People like this are the reasons I stoped gaming... it seemed like every time I tried to learn a new game some cheater would take me out really fast with an exploit.... Halo comes to mind at first.... hiding in places you cant see them then head shot outa no where....

Same reason I stopped playing COD2, it was one epic game until the auto-aimers took over.

"Many account closures come as the direct result of tips emailed to our hacks team by legitimate Battle.net users."

Have someone you don't like, accuse them..... Its like during the Burning Times when all it took to be executed as a witch was to be accused of being one.....

Foub said,
"Many account closures come as the direct result of tips emailed to our hacks team by legitimate Battle.net users."

Have someone you don't like, accuse them..... Its like during the Burning Times when all it took to be executed as a witch was to be accused of being one.....

Except Blizzard performs checks on the person rather than just swinging the ban hammer at them. What, you think they're idiots? The EULA is a legally binding agreement between you and Blizzard... if you break the rules, you get banned (Luckily, it's not worse as in being taken to court) On the other hand if Blizzard arbitrarily decides to break the EULA agreement, then you can easily go ahead and request legal action against them as you are a paying customer who didn't break the rules of the contract (EULA)

Metodi Mitov said,

Except Blizzard performs checks on the person rather than just swinging the ban hammer at them. What, you think they're idiots? The EULA is a legally binding agreement between you and Blizzard... if you break the rules, you get banned (Luckily, it's not worse as in being taken to court) On the other hand if Blizzard arbitrarily decides to break the EULA agreement, then you can easily go ahead and request legal action against them as you are a paying customer who didn't break the rules of the contract (EULA)

the legalities of EULAs are questionable. and good luck taking legal action against a company you have a EULA with that breaks said EULA.

I think this is over multiserver farm bot programs. At the point Blizz figures out what's going on, builds a fix, pushes out the fix that finds the code, collects the amount of users with those accounts and other accounts, and gathers all of those accounts, I would think it would take even longer than this to ban 320k.

Yay Blizzard. If anyone here has tried other online games, you will know just how bad this is, and in World of Warcraft, there is actually very little going on due to Blizzard's exceptional efforts. It seems bad at times, but it is MUCH worse in just about ALL other online games.

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