Cellular radiation app blocked by Steve Jobs, has "no interest"

It’s an age-old question: Is there a risk of harmful long-term radiation exposure from holding a cell phone to your ear for extended periods of time? The issue by no means simple, and has been debated and regulated for quite some time. A quick glance at the Wikipedia page about the subject confirms as much (Incidentally, xkcd creator Randall Munroe created a highly informative radiation chart to put the recent issues of the Japanese nuclear reactor woes into perspective. He quite succinctly brushes of cell phone radiation as a non-issue). No matter which side of the debate you fall on, there’s no denying that the issue is a relevant one, and that a lot of people are still interested in knowing their radiation exposure levels while talking on the phone.

Israeli developer Tawkon developed a mobile app for Android devices that uses RF measurements to gauge radiation emission last year, and they are now looking to release the app on Apple’s iOS platform. Their marketing tactic is to use Antennagate to their advantage. According to Tawkon, the death grip issues that plague the iPhone 4 cause the phone to work harder finding a signal. This, in turn, increases radiation levels. In a video, they demonstrate the difference quite clearly.   

According to Betanews, Steve Jobs personally blocked the app from hitting the market. After the app was rejected in the initial approval stages, CEO Gil Friedlander sent an email to Jobs in an attempt to appeal the decision. Jobs wrote back, in what’s becoming a somewhat iconic email style, “Not interested. ” There has been no explanation as to why the app was rejected.

Tawkon has released their app in Cydia, the (possibly illegal) app store available to users who have taken the plunge into the world of jailbreaking. Friedlander is now making this into a personal rights issue, and claims that

"We believe it is every phone user's fundamental right to know the level of radiation they're exposed to, and to take precautionary measures if they see fit. Tawkon makes it easy for people to use their iPhone with lower exposure to cellphone radiation." 

The company has set up a public petition to try and convince Apple that enough people are generally interested in having this app see the light of day. However, Apple’s track record doesn’t breed very much optimism for the campaign, no matter how deserving it may or may not be.

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While I will admit, I'm not a scientist, but in order to detect radiation, doesn't somebody need a radiation detector or something. And cell phones aren't equipped with those

Phones do NOT emit ionizing radiation, they emit non-ionizing radiation which has been proven with literally dozens of proper studies as being completely safe. This is one instance where Apple have done the right thing. We don't need stupid apps like this scaremongering. The developer is just trying to capitalize on people's fear.

FloatingFatMan said,
Phones do NOT emit ionizing radiation, they emit non-ionizing radiation which has been proven with literally dozens of proper studies as being completely safe. This is one instance where Apple have done the right thing. We don't need stupid apps like this scaremongering. The developer is just trying to capitalize on people's fear.

Exactly. Plus it's not like the iPhone has a built-in Geiger counter. haha.

FloatingFatMan said,
Phones do NOT emit ionizing radiation, they emit non-ionizing radiation which has been proven with literally dozens of proper studies as being completely safe. This is one instance where Apple have done the right thing. We don't need stupid apps like this scaremongering. The developer is just trying to capitalize on people's fear.

Regardless if it is a stupid app, it meat the store qualifications. There are many stupid apps...tons of fart apps...that get approved and posted. Personally, I would like the far apps on all phone stores to be removed...they are stupid and childish and serve no purpose.

And Apple has capitalized on people's fear for years. Example....OSX is safe and Windows gets viruses. Thats scaremongering at a corporate level.

FloatingFatMan said,
Phones do NOT emit ionizing radiation, they emit non-ionizing radiation which has been proven with literally dozens of proper studies as being completely safe. This is one instance where Apple have done the right thing. We don't need stupid apps like this scaremongering. The developer is just trying to capitalize on people's fear.

What part of body did you get taht "ionizing" word? Don't want to guess it...
Microvawes don't emit ionizing radiation too. Will you put a kitten inside?
Have you tried to stand near military redar when the EM shild breaks? I guess not. Or maybe yes...

RealFduch said,

What part of body did you get taht "ionizing" word? Don't want to guess it...
Microvawes don't emit ionizing radiation too. Will you put a kitten inside?
Have you tried to stand near military redar when the EM shild breaks? I guess not. Or maybe yes...

FloatingFatMan said,
Yes, because I'm so going to listen to "advice" about the dangers of microwave radiation from someone who can't even spell it.

He clearly made a typo.

So, either you're not intelligent enough to realize that, and need me to point it out to you, or you're trolling.

I'll let you decide.

Also, if we're going to play the spelling/grammar NAZI game, you shouldn't use quotation marks to suggest that a word that you've typed should be read as having a different implied meaning, and should not be read literally. Quotation marks are for quoting things.

bladebarrier said,

He clearly made a typo.

Once = typo. Multiple times in several posts=illiteracy.

The microwaves generated by a cellphone and the microwaves generated by a microwave oven are vastly different in amplitude and pose zero threat to humans. Cellphones generate, at their maximum, no more than 2 watts in a generalised field, whereas microwave ovens generate 700-1000 watts in a tightly focussed beam of energy, which is what cooks your food.

Sensationalist title. The app was blocked by the people who do app approval which I somehow doubt Jobs is the one doing that. Do people really expect him to look into every case for every app that gets rejected. Come back to the real world were the CEO has better things to do.

Regression_88 said,
In case you missed it 'cause you didn't read the manual for your iPhone, according to http://www.iphonefaq.org/archives/97600 :
Original iPhone: 0.974 (FCC ID: BCGA1203)
iPhone 3G: 1.38 (FCC ID: BCGA1241)
iPhone 3GS: 0.79 (FCC ID: BCGA13303A)
iPhone 4: 1.17 (FCC ID: BCG-E2380A)

From cellphones.about.com/od/phoneglossary/g/sarradiation.htm -
"SAR stands for specific absorption rate. The lower your cell phone SAR, the lower your electromagnetic radiation exposure and therefore potential health risks associated with using your cell phone.

In North America, a cell phone's SAR rating is measured between 0.0 and 1.60 with 1.60 set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) as the maximum level of radiation permissible.
....
In Europe, the SAR rating runs from 0.0 to 2.0 as adopted by the European Union Council and recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP).

In North America, SAR is measured in watts per kilogram (or W/kg) averaged over one gram of biological tissue while in Europe SAR is averaged over 10 grams. The FCC limit, which averages over one gram of body tissue, is much stricter than the rest of the world.
...."
Which roughly translates to "A cell phone purchased in the US is potentially 10 times safer than one purchased elsewhere.

The article goes on to say:
"In addition to proactively selecting a cell phone with a low SAR rating, you can also reduce your radiation exposure by using a short-range Bluetooth wireless headset (like this one) to keep your cell phone away from your head or use your cell phone's speakerphone."

This is one of the rare instances I agree with Steve Jobs; that information is published online and should also be in the manual for the device, as I believe it's a requirement by the FCC to publish it.
So you DON'T need an app for that.

Disclaimer- I work on cell towers and such; have done so for nearly 15 years. On a nearly daily basis, I'm exposed to radiation from between 5 to 25 times higher than what your phone emits.
And I don't have cancer.

I smoke for 55 years now, and I don't have cancer.

oh lets just start letting him pick who gets to sell what? seems um controlling and almost like a "mob" like tatic, we will let you get rich if we like you.... personal interests and ideas shouldnt pick what apps get sold... that should be up to the buyer... now illegal apps, sure dont allow them, but any normal app, keep out of it...

and since this is an anti cell like app for cell radiation, of course he doesnt want it since it makes one of his top selling products look potentially bad....

neufuse said,
oh lets just start letting him pick who gets to sell what? seems um controlling and almost like a "mob" like tatic, we will let you get rich if we like you.... personal interests and ideas shouldnt pick what apps get sold... that should be up to the buyer... now illegal apps, sure dont allow them, but any normal app, keep out of it...

and since this is an anti cell like app for cell radiation, of course he doesnt want it since it makes one of his top selling products look potentially bad....

The information the App provides should be in the manual, and is online.

For what it's worth, SAR is based on continuous exposure with the phone operating at maximum transmitted power level- something your cell phone will NEVER see unless you're jacked in AND on the phone 24/7.

Brian Miller said,
So, the app store in many ways is like a dictatorship.

Not really it's like any other stores around.

Last tiem i checked a store can and do sell the products they want.

Wouldn't surprise me if the steve mail was just fake to get some attention

Anyway... Why is cydia mention as the possibly illegal installer you get from jailbreaking? There is nothing illegal neither about jailbreaking nor cydia

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