Chairman of the MPAA to be thrown out of office

It's fairly common knowledge that the MPAA isn't the most popular organization in the world. The current chairman, Dan Glickman, is being removed from office in 18 months time. Why? Because of a lacking performance, and fighting against millions of people around the world in an attempt to keep piracy at bay.

According to TorrentFreak, many of the methods that the MPAA is currently employing are beginning to backfire, and the firm has received a lot of negative PR after The Pirate Bay trial. Again according to TorrentFreak, "Others claim that Glickman's leadership has been lackluster, his public speaking gigs 'bad' and 'boring'," and so far it's unclear on who will be replacing Glickman.

It makes you wonder who will hire Glickman after this; he has held office for the last four and a half years. Compare that to the previous chairman, Jack Valenti was chairman for 38 years. So, now is your chance to speak free, Neowin; do you (for some reason) wish Glickman to stay in office, or is it a good step that he's being outed?

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To fire a chairman is not equal to fire a common employee. When you fire a chairman, you must pay many millions of dollar for concept of indemnization, usually a chairman is relocated or forced to resign and only in "special cases" is fired, and many times, the "special case" is because some scam or to force a chapter 11 bankruptcy.

The only way they can stop piracy, is to be a friendly company that makes customer's feel guilty about stealing (or the bulk) instead they treat them like trash, expect them to pay, and raise a generation where they feel it should be free.

fighting against millions of people around the world in an attempt to keep piracy at bay

Yeah I'm sure that's one of the reasons...

C_Guy said,
fighting against millions of people around the world in an attempt to keep piracy at bay

Yeah I'm sure that's one of the reasons...


It is, because of the way they take so many members of the public to court, amongst other things.

When the MPAA sues and gets money from pirates, does the original creator get any of that or is it just a ruse to keep the MPAA's executives making millions.....?

TOOLaudiofan said,
When the MPAA sues and gets money from pirates, does the original creator get any of that or is it just a ruse to keep the MPAA's executives making millions.....?

Even if they get no money, it there will be one fewer pirates out there distributing their content.

I always thought the MPAA sucked, ever since they use the FBI to kick my doors in and commit terrorist acts on me and my family over movies I NEVER downloaded!

oh no. no more entertainment from the entertainment industry =(
wait, they'll just put another guy to lose law suits up there. no change actually =P

The whole issue with these companies is that they're trying to 'keep piracy at bay'. Good luck, it's like the war on drugs. Wars end, this won't.

Why can't these companies (if they're getting low on money, which is why they're taking such a big fight against piracy surely!) use what's left of their cash to try and formulate new ideas to exist and co-habit with the internet because I'm pretty certain they could find some new way, it's not like no one has managed to find anything profitable via the internet. If they continue in the fight, they'll always be the loser - just look at the RIAA - they took people to court, actually realised it wasn't helping in the slightest.

Exactly. I think we should pay a license fee for the right to download free music. A certain, FAIR, amount each month (like your phone bill) and you just download anything you want.
And if you don't want to pay the fee, you can still pay for CDs or download through current sources like you do now.
Granted, people will still download without paying, but then people still watch TV without paying the license. There's always a minority, you've just got to try and catch them out

Another drawback would be dishing it out fairly to artists, but it's just an idea

As long as media is digital, there will be someone there to pirate it. The answer is to make a product or service that is so enticing that everyone uses it legitimately.

There could be a bad thing to this though if they bring in some "uber tough ill sue every single person in the world" chairman. Which I feel would be a possibility because they are obviously losing to the pirates.

But overall MPAA/RIAA = Fail :P

Stocker33 said,
There could be a bad thing to this though if they bring in some "uber tough ill sue every single person in the world" chairman. Which I feel would be a possibility because they are obviously losing to the pirates.

But overall MPAA/RIAA = Fail :P

They will fail no matter what unless the utilize torrents and proper file sharing, honestly... it's the only way the music industry will not go down under even more than it already has, and then the bands and singers won't complain as much about not having enough millions of dollars.

MPAA is just so horrible at their attempts to stop piracy... I stand by my word when I say, the person who marries the Music Industry with the Internet will be the next millionaire. And by married, I mean, who can completely utilize torrents and other means of P2P, while still being able to charge the customers. They need to be able to learn from pirates and understand why most people download music illegally, and then use that to their advantage. There are ways, I believe, but, it's going to take a smart man to do it.

As for this guy getting fired, meh, don't care... he's doing a poor job at his job and should be let go. The next man needs to do basically what I said, and I bet you piracy will drop...

oh... and stop producing crappy music, that would also help the music industry.

jase savior said,
MPAA is just so horrible at their attempts to stop piracy... I stand by my word when I say, the person who marries the Music Industry with the Internet will be the next millionaire. And by married, I mean, who can completely utilize torrents and other means of P2P, while still being able to charge the customers. They need to be able to learn from pirates and understand why most people download music illegally, and then use that to their advantage. There are ways, I believe, but, it's going to take a smart man to do it.

As for this guy getting fired, meh, don't care... he's doing a poor job at his job and should be let go. The next man needs to do basically what I said, and I bet you piracy will drop...

oh... and stop producing crappy music, that would also help the music industry.


I always hear this but the argument makes no sense. What doesn't iTunes do that music pirates are seeking? It simply boils down to this, do you want to pay for music or do you want to get it free. It is so easy to get it free nowdays. What other option is there besides suing people? There is none.

Everyone hates the MPAA and the RIAA but I really never felt nearly as much hatred for either as most people do. I suspect it is because I do not steal media and I stand zero chance of getting sued by them.

"oh... and stop producing crappy music, that would also help the music industry."

You've spoken like a true prodigy. I'd like to add "start producing NEW music. Please stop with the "mash-ups" and "re-dos." Then sales will get waaaaay better trust me.

babyHacker said,
I always hear this but the argument makes no sense. What doesn't iTunes do that music pirates are seeking?

A significant problem is that piracy offers a superset of legitimate things.

No legitimate service could offer a "100% of everything" catalog right now. There are just too many works in ownership limbo or tied to firms that simply don't want to license. Moreover, there's a diminishing return aspect-- is it worth going through the effort to licence a recording only requested three times per year on average?

If there were a service granted (probably through government intervention), a blanket license to distribute any and all music, that could compete with piracy.

This logic applies to ALL content being pirated, not just music, too. Look at the anime marketplace-- unofficial subtitled video is huge, simply because for many series, a legitimate option doesn't exist, or comes only in "we're releasing from episode 1, and if you want to watch episode 300, pencil it in for June 2022" mode.

EchoNoise said,
The chairman?...

I'm guessing the shareholders are the ones who are kicking him off the team?


MPAA doesn't have shares, nor is it publicly traded. Its a "non-profit" entity supported by other studios.

and the conversation goes a little something like this

MPAA "Dan, we've got some bad news and some good news"
Dan "ok, what's the bad news"
MPAA "You're fired"
Dan "omg omg. no. i'll do anything to stay" "whatever, tell me the good news"
MPAA "you're last day will be in 18 months ..... hmm, anything you say?"

z0phi3l said,
Too bad they'll just get a bailout instead

If the movie industry gets a bailout I'm moving...... actors, athletes, singers, CEO's - these are all great examples of professionals that are grossly overpaid.

Well if he is doing a poor job at it I don't have a problem with him staying more negative PR is exactly what the MPAA needs