Changing of the guard: Nokia sign comes down, Microsoft's goes up

Tomorrow, Microsoft and Nokia will shake hands and formally head in separate direction; Nokia will walk away with a plump wallet and Microsoft will walk away with 32,000 employees and become the largest vendor of Windows Phones in the world. Wanting to waste no time in making the transition official, a Nokia building is currently in the process of having it's branding removed and it will be replaced by Microsoft.

The images of the this process were posted up on Facebook, and you can see the truck ready to remove the Nokia logo in the image above, and the "ft" of the Microsoft logo in the image below. This transition has been in the works for a long time, so both companies had plenty of time to prepare for this moment but not many expected the sign changing to happen so quickly seeing as it's not always easy to pull down these massive signs.

But with Microsoft, who has cash to spare and the ability to move quickly, the changing of the guard for them is likely a highly symbolic gesture to put this massive acquisition behind them. We expect Microsoft will likely trumpet the completion of the acquisition tomorrow with some sort of celebration, or at minimum, an official announcement from both companies that the process is done. 

And now we have the final image of the building with the new Microsoft logo.

Source: Facebook | Harri Kiljander and @Osmo_W

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I know you'll probably hate me for this, but I feel quite happy about Microsoft doing this. I mean, put all the hardware under the same brand like they're doing with surface and now with phones, just like Apple started doing many years ago. This is huge, Nokia has always been really important all around the world, this could be a new boost I guess.

I think it's a shame. Nokia could have easily competed with the likes of Samsung and HTC but they ruined it. I don't know if my opinion is correct but in my heart, Nokia phones are better than most - I just wish they ran Android at the specs of high end competition.

Brad Sams, it would be appropriate and normal journalistic practice to add a "photo by" reference. I took the photos last night at the Nokia Head Office in Espoo, Finland. Thanks.

You would be correct. They are only buying one division of Nokia. It wouldn't make sense to sell Nokia phones when the Nokia company isn't make phones anymore.

It's kind of a shame though, because I relate the Nokia brand as dependable and long lasting, not to mention the nostalgic connection to them being my first cell fone.

udvarhelyigabor520 said,
MS needs to drop the name 'Nokia'
They are, I'm pretty sure the new phones after the current ones will be "Microsoft" phones

udvarhelyigabor520 said,
MS needs to drop the name 'Nokia'

They shouldn't but they have to. They didn't buy 'Nokia' they bought resources from Nokia. The Nokia brandname is very powerful. I wonder how Windows Phone will do without the brand. Would have been better if Microsoft was able to continue to produce phones under the Nokia brand.

Maybe even using 'Nokia' as an MS brand. So instead of Microsoft Lumia call it Microsoft Nokia. You could say 'I have a Nokia phone' similar to how you say 'I have a surface tablet'. Most people I know already say they have a Nokia. Nobody says they have a Lumia.

Shiranui said,
So is this the beginning of the end for the Finnish economy?

NSN, Here are much bigger than Nokia Devices afaik. Please don't embarrass yourself.

You can't!
I live in Espoo and I already acquired all of it disguised as a clean-up guy.
I'm gonna have fun for at least a decade! (while crying inside)

CyberAngel said,
You can't!
I live in Espoo and I already acquired all of it disguised as a clean-up guy.
I'm gonna have fun for at least a decade! (while crying inside)

All that bubble wrap fun, from M to T!

Edited by Justin Luna, Apr 27 2014, 11:24am :

Microsoft have pretty much been calling the shots since they partnered with Nokia anyway, this is all largely cosmetic.

Javik said,
Microsoft have pretty much been calling the shots since they partnered with Nokia anyway, this is all largely cosmetic.

Exactly. MS owned them in all but name. As soon as Stephen "The Trojan Horse" Elop became CEO, it was game over for Nokia's handset business.

At least they have 7.2B in their pocket now, instead like BlackBerry that nobody wants to buy. Without funding from MS, Nokia probably was gone long time and would be much cheaper ...

simplezz said,

Exactly. MS owned them in all but name. As soon as Stephen "The Trojan Horse" Elop became CEO, it was game over for Nokia's handset business.

What do you mean not easy to pull down those signs? The people that do it make it look like it's effortless... The thing that surprises some is how big the letters can be... I know in Pittsburgh when UPMC put their name up on the USX tower, it took a helicopter to get the letters up because it was the tallest building in Pitt and the letters were 4 stories tall. :)

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/...2558377345_a0449d296b_z.jpg now that was an install! If you can do it with a crane, it's easy *lol*

Hopefully this mean my 1520 won't freeze up on me again and need to go in for repairs :p

Love the 1520, but have had some iffy experiences with it so far. Anyway, good luck to all involved in the transition!

At the very least, they probably have a license to use it in their dumbphones.

For anything else, they'd just switch it to a Segoe variant.

Similar, yes. But like most things utilitarian they must look the same in order to provide a function. An F must be an F, of course I could make a new font where "W" was my stylised F but it could make English pretty hard to wucking understand ;)

The Pure font (compared to Arial) features flatter bowls, squared decenders (where the decender on Arial's Y curves into a leg, Pure's continues on a straight, clean angle.) The lowercase t is nearly identical, however instead of a short leg like Airial, the Pure font has a longer tapering leg.

Minor cosmetics, but in typography they really can make a difference. The sharper and crisper letter forms are designed for high resolution screens (as such are designed to prevent aliasing) whereas Arial is a print type, designed for headers and posters.

mdtaUK said,
So many questions about who owns what now...

Nokia Pure for instance...

How is that a question? If the devices and services division of Nokia owned it, Microsoft does now, other wise they don't

The Asha and Nokia X phones use it for their UI. Lumia uses it for its logo, and some of the Nokia apps. And as Microsoft is now running the Nokia websites and social network outlets, the font is still going to be in use, and I wonder if Microsoft will replace it's use, or perhaps embrace it for that division.

paulheu said,
How is that a question? If the devices and services division of Nokia owned it, Microsoft does now, other wise they don't

Well duh.. that's kind of the point he was making and a perfect illustration of the question he was referring to. Which division of Nokia owned all this stuff?