China outlines plans to use Internet for global propaganda

China is infamous for their Internet censorship and the “great firewall of China,” but a leaked speech to the Standing Committee of the national People’s Congress on April 29 contains rhetoric that implies a Chinese Internet that not only defensively protects its citizens from outside influence, but also actively spreads government propaganda to the four corners of the Earth. This planned effort to change public opinion using the Internet was outlined in an accidentally uncensored speech by Wang Chen, deputy director of the Propaganda Department. The speech was promptly removed from the official government website once it was posted. According the Sydney Morning Herald, an advocacy group Human Rights in China picked up the speech before it was taken down for sanitation and relocation.

Wang was optimistic about China’s use of the Internet to promote its ideals. Here are some excerpts from the speech:

“The Internet has broadened the front of our propaganda and ideological work. In recent years, we have used the Internet to vigorously organize and launch positive propaganda, and actively strengthen our abilities to guide public opinion. [As a result,] we have been able to play an important role in serving the overall interests of the Party and our country, and have achieved major innovations in the Party’s propaganda and ideological work in the new era.”

“Government agencies at all levels and in all regions have gradually built mechanisms to guide public opinion through integrating the functions of propaganda departments and actual work departments, integrating online media and traditional media, and integrating major news websites and commercial websites. These mechanisms have continuously improved the capabilities and levels of public opinion guidance. Under the unified leadership of the Party, we organized initiatives to guide public opinion related to major emergency incidents, hot topics related to people’s welfare, and key ideological issues.”

“About 44 news and commercial websites have launched foreign language channels. [As a result,] our ability to disseminate information to the outside world has markedly strengthened. These foreign language channels are becoming an important force in countering the hegemony of Western media and in bolstering our country’s cultural soft power.”

Wang goes on to outline major government institutions and departments and their respective responsibilities in the proper management of the Chinese Internet. According Anne-Marie Brady, a Chinese propaganda expert at the University of New Zealand, this behavior is simply endemic of Chinese isolationism regarding global connectivity. “'China has this goal of establishing a Chinese intranet, removing China from the global Internet, and you can see that in this report.'' This wouldn't be the first time China is described as isolationist. Google, through a stroke of diplomatic magic, managed to get China to renew their license to operate their website on Chinese networks last week. The site faced nearly unstoppable pushback from the Chinese Government when they let the Chinese people use Google to for unfiltered search. 

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But USA is using :
-TV
-Movies
-Newspaper.
-Magazine
-Radio
-Internet.

for their global propaganda.

For example, last month i read a videogame magazine and i saw a publicity about to join the army, kill a muslim and get a cookie or something like that.

ps :also in bottled water (tin foil hat for everyone).

Wow... C&C Generals called it: "Our people will grow stronger!" Damn those level 3 Hackers in their Internet station... they make so much damn money!!!

amon91 said,
Become a free nation. That's the best form of propaganda ever.

Become a best nation.

For example, (a hypothetical case),if The Heaven was a nation, then undoubtedly it will be the best one but is also a tyranny, ruled by a unique and eternal government.

So, sometimes people think that free = good but it is not always true.

Anyways, China is still a WIP.

"countering the hegemony of Western media and in bolstering our country's cultural soft power"

What exactly defines "Western media" today? Western media in my view is basically anything that offers an English translation, which is, infact, almost everything mainstream (other than Chinese sites). So what exactly is western media? I don't get it. The internet is everything, China excluded. What kind of culture will the Chinese push back all the western media with? Communistic bias?

I'm at a loss in understanding their logic. If the above paragraph makes no sense, then I am right: This is stupid.

Recon415 said,
"countering the hegemony of Western media and in bolstering our country's cultural soft power"

What exactly defines "Western media" today? Western media in my view is basically anything that offers an English translation, which is, infact, almost everything mainstream (other than Chinese sites). So what exactly is western media? I don't get it. The internet is everything, China excluded. What kind of culture will the Chinese push back all the western media with? Communistic bias?

I'm at a loss in understanding their logic. If the above paragraph makes no sense, then I am right: This is stupid.

It's easier to define western media by sorting out what isn't. Just because it's in the English language doesn't mean that a certain media is necessarily based on espoused western values, which is what the Chinese are getting at. Even their neighbor Japan holds far stronger soft power in the form of their popular cultural exports, which include their animation industries. Anime isn't viewed as Western, it's viewed as Japanese, even if it's been localized into English, because often the cultural cues present in the media are not western, they're Japanese.

As for what the Chinese would push back with, of course it would be a Chinese bias. It's no different from any other nation trying to put themselves in a positive light.

Kyang said,

It's easier to define western media by sorting out what isn't. Just because it's in the English language doesn't mean that a certain media is necessarily based on espoused western values, which is what the Chinese are getting at. Even their neighbor Japan holds far stronger soft power in the form of their popular cultural exports, which include their animation industries. Anime isn't viewed as Western, it's viewed as Japanese, even if it's been localized into English, because often the cultural cues present in the media are not western, they're Japanese.

As for what the Chinese would push back with, of course it would be a Chinese bias. It's no different from any other nation trying to put themselves in a positive light.

I was trying to refer to what the Chinese view as Western culture. AFAIK the Chinese hate the Japanese (aside from their long histories of conflict) because Japan is very "westernized".

Kyang said,
It's easier to define western media by sorting out what isn't. Just because it's in the English language doesn't mean that a certain media is necessarily based on espoused western values, which is what the Chinese are getting at. Even their neighbor Japan holds far stronger soft power in the form of their popular cultural exports, which include their animation industries. Anime isn't viewed as Western, it's viewed as Japanese, even if it's been localized into English, because often the cultural cues present in the media are not western, they're Japanese.

As for what the Chinese would push back with, of course it would be a Chinese bias. It's no different from any other nation trying to put themselves in a positive light.

Good lord, China's soft culture power sounds as ambiguous as Dr Mahathir Mohamad's 'Asian value speech' who seem to have repackaged universal values as some how being unique to Asia. Talk about a desperate attempt to develop relevancy off the back of actually contributing nothing to humanity. Almost as pathetic as the head of NASA trying to make Muslims feel good about themselves (here was I thinking NASA was about space exploration).

rawr_boy81 said,

Good lord, China's soft culture power sounds as ambiguous as Dr Mahathir Mohamad's 'Asian value speech' who seem to have repackaged universal values as some how being unique to Asia. Talk about a desperate attempt to develop relevancy off the back of actually contributing nothing to humanity. Almost as pathetic as the head of NASA trying to make Muslims feel good about themselves (here was I thinking NASA was about space exploration).

It's not ambiguous, it's nonexistent. What does China stand for anymore? I'm not sure even the Chinese themselves know anymore.

It's kind of what happens when a few thousand year old world view is destroyed in a few decades, followed by nothing but constant chaos for another couple more.