Chinese law for real-name internet registration passed

Internet in China is heavily regulated, and the infamous "Great Firewall of China" is often cited in media as a prime example. Through this firewall, sites we take for granted are blocked or limited; famously, mentions of Tiananmen Square are censored, with users reportedly bypassing filters by referring to the incident as 'May 35'.

New legislation has entered pls that could impact Chinese internet use further, according to reports from state media. Before coming into effect, it will be subjected to revisions and discussion among the National People's Congress Standing Committee. Officially meant to “enhance protection of personal info online” and to “safeguard public interests," the rulings have been a cause of some concern due to internet registration with your real name. Some clauses exist allowing usage of pseudonyms, though it remains a controversial topic.

Posts deemed illegal can be deleted, even if you're not aware you are breaking any laws. Outlawed groups like the Falun Gong may find it difficult to communicate as a result of these changes. Sites like Facebook (which seems to be unavailable in China) likely will not have content removed, though China's own Twitteresque social network, Sina Weibo, most likely will remove illegal posts.

Source: The Next Web | Image via Shutterstock

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14 Comments

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The most important thing of passing the law is: no one dare to say any bad thing about the government. if anyone complains about the government, s/he will be caught by the government.

Non-issue for many chinese as fake or other peoples' id codes can be easily hacked, stolen and distributed easily and widely in china. It is believed that chinese hackers already possess the entire social security codes for the entire korean/japanese population. The chinese will just use of their politician's id code.

If you've ever been to china and used the Internet you'd find it actually isn't a communist free for all like it's made out to be. It's easy enough to use a VPN/SSH to get access to restricted sites, granted I use them as I would here, not to make public statements but still. It's not really that bad.

actually its a nightmare, especially since they had all the vpn companies panicking to fix the block they made on all vpn connections recently.

Not that bad? Even VPNs are now being blocked, requiring continuous modifications by the hosts to get around the new blocks. Every day more and more sites are blocked, including anything by Google (Gmail, Google+, Docs, Calendar, Play Store, etc.). You've obviously not spent much time in China to make such an ill-informed statement as you've done.

In a society like china i would probably use a fake name. But here in Canada, heck, only the tin-foil hat wearing people are scared of real name registration.

rippleman said,
In a society like china i would probably use a fake name. But here in Canada, heck, only the tin-foil hat wearing people are scared of real name registration.

So your real name is rippleman?

Colin McGregor said,
I use my real name for all the sites I go on. I don't do anything that would require me to hide myself.
It doesn't matter if you don't do anything that requires yourself to hide, by default there needs to be way more privacy online than there is. Get on youtube and watch RT's interview with William Binney ex-NSA; he tells how EVERY email is logged. Hackers can break security, who's to say nobody would use what you write in emails against you in the future.

Colin McGregor said,
I use my real name for all the sites I go on. I don't do anything that would require me to hide myself.

How do i know you're the REAL Colin McGregor hmmm?

Yes, but you're not in China... I see your point, and agree, but if I were in China, I don't think I'd be using my name either. LOL

..as opposed to fake name registration?

How is this different from any other country's registration policies?

Neowin's version of the article is very confusing. Snipped from main article:

"To its credit, the legislation comes with provisions that require network operators to safeguard the privacy of account information collected during the process. Users would still be allowed to use pseudonyms online."