Computing History Museum opens their Cambridge, UK location on Saturday

You probably don't expect to read about museums on this site, but we think you'll enjoy this bit of information. A couple of years ago, the Centre for Computing History was looking to grow into a new space. Their old museum was small and cramped, with only 1,000 square feet available to display old computing devices and a mere 2,200 square feet of densely packed storage space. The organization was seeking donations so that they could open up a real space to share the history of computing, and many large companies including Microsoft, Google, and Samsung, stepped up to the plate to assist.

Their dreams are finally coming to fruition as they open their doors to the public on July 27th. The new space, which boasts over 10,000 square feet of space, will be able to show off many more of the devices that make up the history of computing. There are also going to be interactive displays and events. For example, they have working vintage computers in the foyer and a 1980's classroom with working BBC micros for patrons to experiment programming with.

The museum also hopes to encourage the nation's youth to take up programming. In an educational partnership with Google, the organization is holding a Road Show where they will introduce children to both BASIC on vintage machines, as well as Python on the popular Raspberry Pi platform. The goal is to go beyond just using a computer and instead teach people how computers work which will help grow their analytical, mathematical, and logic skills.

The museum's hours are 10am-5pm, Wednesday through Sunday, with Mondays and Tuesdays reserved for special bookings. The price is only £5 for adults and £4 for children until October 1st while the museum continues setting up new exhibits. After that, the price will modestly increase. The address for the new museum is Coldhams Road, Cambridge, CB1 3EW. If you're in the area, be sure to check it out and let us know what you think!

Source and Images via Centre for Computing History

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