EU rejects latest antitrust proposal from Google

Google will have to try again to settle accusations by the European Union's anti-trust agency that it has a monopoly on Internet search services if it wants to avoid receiving a major fine. Today, the leader of the European Commission, Joaquin Almunia, stated on a Spanish radio program that Google's latest proposal did not "eliminate our concerns regarding competition" in search.

The Associated Press reports that the commission felt Google's new offer did not settle issues on how the company deals with online review services other than its own Yelp brand, along with price comparison shopping services. However, Almunia did indicate the company still has a chance to come up with a solution, saying, "... the ball is still in Google's court. But within a short timeframe the ball will be here and then it will be the moment to take decisions."

In an emailed statement, Google spokesperson Al Verney said, "We've made significant changes to address the EC's concerns, greatly increasing the visibility of rival services and addressing other specific issues." However, there's no word if Google will offer yet another settlement deal. Almunia said that the commission's investigation would likely end in the spring of 2014; he would not rule out the possibility of slapping Google with a large fine.

Google's search services have over a 90 percent market share in Europe.  The company's latest concession to the EU would let competing businesses bid to have links to their services placed just below Google's own in search results. However, many companies, including Microsoft, have told the commission that would be too costly for them and would prefer Google offer search results that are completely impartial.

Source: Associated Press | Image via Google

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Really only the first page or two are good results. Then they start to degrade from there. If I cannot find what I am looking for on the first few pages, then I will refine my search. SO doesnt matter if Bing returns 20k results and Google returns 10k. Just as long as what you are looking for is on the first few pages, good to go.

Like all the different app stores...lots of apps are crap, and lots of search results are crap. Its being able to find what you need quickly/efficiently that will win over customers.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

IMHO, they're horrible. I just put in the following:

next version of office for mac

The first two links are to articles that are from 4 years ago

Nope. 8/2012 and 4/2013.

I find it hilarious that people keep complaining about Bing not working outside the US. Ever since I started using it, I just switch from Worldwide to US and done - never needed to google something since.

Gornot said,
I find it hilarious that people keep complaining about Bing not working outside the US. Ever since I started using it, I just switch from Worldwide to US and done - never needed to google something since.

http://i40.tinypic.com/155l1qv.jpg
Getting less results (42k), but all right on spot, even when it's not strictly set to US.
But your right, people need to learn to sign in with their MS account and set it up, something which is done automatically on Windows 8/8.1

Gornot said,
I find it hilarious that people keep complaining about Bing not working outside the US. Ever since I started using it, I just switch from Worldwide to US and done - never needed to google something since.

Problem is I want to do a lot of local searches in my native tongue... And when I query my searches into Google, even in English, it will sooner go to EU sources than American.

If I set Bing to US only, 60-70% of my searches become worthless. And the results I am already getting are often poor at best.

I'm keeping Bing to my own country and I've been seeing it slowly improve the last few years... versus Google which I've seen slowly getting worse (so many bogus search results and GO AWAY SOFTWAREINFORMER! pointless POS).. '

Bing, like Google needs to be 'trained'. Be used. When you've been using Google for years and then try Bing out a few times, yes it will suck. Because Google knows your way of searching and is familiar with that.

so to summarize, Bing sux outside of US.. while in US, it is more or less on par with Google. So, in a global world nowadays, Bing has a lot more to catch up with Google. There you go.

lol they even copied that from MSFT. But seriously, this is just the show before the good show. the DOJ will soon come down on them, and we may just get what MSFT should have gotten: company split. good for consumers.

This doesn't make much sense, using Google is a choice. If Google somehow blocked you from going to bing.com or yahoo.com then they would have a point, but that is not in their power. Even on android in chrome on a nexus 7, I can visit other search engines and specify a different default search engine.

The deals google has with other companies were also choices by those companies, they were not forced to enter into agreements with google.

I do agree though that page rankings should be objective.

Geezy said,

I do agree though that page rankings should be objective.

Those are most of the time manipulated by site owners themselves, but at least there is not one perfect way in how to practice SEO optimization.

Geezy said,
This doesn't make much sense, using Google is a choice. If Google somehow blocked you from going to bing.com or yahoo.com then they would have a point, but that is not in their power. Even on android in chrome on a nexus 7, I can visit other search engines and specify a different default search engine.

The deals google has with other companies were also choices by those companies, they were not forced to enter into agreements with google.

I do agree though that page rankings should be objective.


same thing could have been said about microsoft's internet explorer problem with the eu, but that didn't stop the eu from slapping a big fine on Microsoft.

Except Google's not a product that you can't uninstall which is bundled with a product that has a monopoly in order to gain an unfair advantage.

Geezy said,
Except Google's not a product that you can't uninstall which is bundled with a product that has a monopoly in order to gain an unfair advantage.

Yes, it is. You've just got it backward in which is the product with a monopoly, and which is the bundled product. The monopoly is on search and advertising.

Google is the operating system Windows in this analogy - the product with a monopoly, and the services provided are the product you can't uninstall that is bundled. It wouldn't be a problem if they weren't giving them preferential treatment, and definitely not a problem if they had less than 90% market share in the EU.

They leverage their dominance in the search market and the advertising space (Adsense, almost all websites) to get an unfair advantage in other markets.

It's textbook anticompetitive behavior.

Companies should be fined over and over, but not at regular predicted interval/timing nor at predictable 'pricing',
otherwise companies will simply moves the cost to consumers just like they did on Taxes.

Greetings from China - the world's biggest market and now, thankfully, a Google-free zone. FYI: the Internet becomes a better experience if and when you kick Google to the kerb as we have here. The vacuum they created was rapidly filled by local companies providing better services in a far more competitive environment.

It's shameful that Westerners need to learn about "freedom of choice" from Communist China.

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