Facebook makes it easier to integrate with Windows 8 and WP8 apps

While we still wait for Facebook to release an official app for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8, the social networking service is now making it easier for third-party app developers of those platforms to put in Facebook features in their apps.

In a post on the Windows Phone developer blog, Microsoft has announced that Facebook has now released the Facebook SDK for .NET, based on C#/XAML. This new set of software tools should allow for more and better integration of Facebook features inside Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 apps.

The SDK is part of the Facebook Technology Partners program and is an open source project that's owned and maintained by the Outercurve Foundation. App developers can go to the Facebook SDK website to download the tools which include tutorials for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 apps.

Microsoft says this new Facebook SDK has two key features that should please app developers. One is that it makes logging into Facebook from within apps easier, saying, "Based on the provided samples, all you need to do is use a bit of boilerplate code, add your Facebook app ID to the mix, and voila! You can have people logging on to your app with Facebook."

The other feature, according to the blog, will let developers "focus on your Facebook-related scenarios by abstracting away the low-level details such as HTTP connections and query parameters." Code sharing between Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 app should also be easy with these new tools.

Source: Windows Phone developer blog | Image via Microsoft

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Will this allow apps to auto log users in if they have Facebook linked to the phone once permissions are approved?

Great. Posting from many apps on Android and a few on iOS is kind of flaky. Should be solid on W8 and WP8 with these tools.

j2006 said,
Sigh.... lazy! Hurry up and make your own native apps. At least Twitter gets it.

Twitter only semi gets it. They got a 3rd party to make their apps rather than build them themselves like they do with Android and iOS.

thealexweb said,

Twitter only semi gets it. They got a 3rd party to make their apps rather than build them themselves like they do with Android and iOS.


Actually, many companies get third-parties to develop apps for them. That's normal since you can't expect every company to know how to develop for every platform. This is why the publisher of the app is "Twitter, Inc." and not some third-party. I wouldn't be surprised if they got a third-party to develop their iOS and Android versions as well. The important thing is that it's fully-functional and up to date with the web version and got the company's blessing, which it is and they did.

ahhell said,
Awesome....just what the world needed.
/s
Sadly, a large portion of user's expect facebook integration to some degree in applications and websites. This SDK will be very useful to those using .net. I plan on wiring it up into a project in the coming week to see if it fixes a large number of our problems integrating with Facebook.

I don't understand why it would be sad. Many like to post music they're listening to with a click on their music app, or post a GPS recording of their run or hike, and share photos from their image editing apps. This gives exposure to the application developer. I don't see how that can be seen as a bad thing.

MorganX said,
I don't understand why it would be sad. Many like to post music they're listening to with a click on their music app, or post a GPS recording of their run or hike, and share photos from their image editing apps. This gives exposure to the application developer. I don't see how that can be seen as a bad thing.
I find those acts, aside form photos to be incredibly annoying. Frankly, there are very few people I know of a few different age groups that really enjoy that social spam.

So, I'm more than happy to allow people to do it, but I find anybody that does do it to be incredibly annoying. At least facebook allows you to block posts from applications.

Most facebook posts are shared with a person's Friends, and they are not automatic. A person chooses to share those things. If it annoys you, restrict these people or block them, or get off facebook? Your argument makes no sense to me as it's none of your business what others like to post and share on a social network. Why are you on it?

MrHumpty said,
I find those acts, aside form photos to be incredibly annoying. Frankly, there are very few people I know of a few different age groups that really enjoy that social spam.

So, I'm more than happy to allow people to do it, but I find anybody that does do it to be incredibly annoying. At least facebook allows you to block posts from applications.

MorganX said,
Most facebook posts are shared with a person's Friends, and they are not automatic. A person chooses to share those things. If it annoys you, restrict these people or block them, or get off facebook? Your argument makes no sense to me as it's none of your business what others like to post and share on a social network. Why are you on it?
A user spamming information from a service on facebook to people who do not like that spam reflects not only on that person but the service. For me its a question of the net return. If my application's spam created by a user of their own free will will create a net positive reputation with those other users.

I'm on Facebook. I can't stand spam posts from games or applications. I've "friends" who spam from applications that haven't given me the ability to just block that service. I have a poor outlook on services that spam usage information. There are those users who will, in many cases, unknowingly spam to their timeline w/o noticing it.

Also, it is my business if it's my service. The net effect on my bottom line is my conundrum. I've yet to meet someone who loves the facebook spam generated by services and in many cases those services have that spam on by default.

That type of SPAM really has not thing to do with this. This is for applications that people want to share, under user control. If a user you are friends with, shares on their account their application status, whether it be their last run, or what they're listening to, then you should not subscribe to their status updates.

Posting Spam to your account is a whole other matter.


MrHumpty said,
A user spamming information from a service on facebook to people who do not like that spam reflects not only on that person but the service. For me its a question of the net return. If my application's spam created by a user of their own free will will create a net positive reputation with those other users.

I'm on Facebook. I can't stand spam posts from games or applications. I've "friends" who spam from applications that haven't given me the ability to just block that service. I have a poor outlook on services that spam usage information. There are those users who will, in many cases, unknowingly spam to their timeline w/o noticing it.

Also, it is my business if it's my service. The net effect on my bottom line is my conundrum. I've yet to meet someone who loves the facebook spam generated by services and in many cases those services have that spam on by default.