Facebook "spam king" turns himself in to authorities

A man charged with sending around 27 million Facebook messages has given up the chase and handed himself in to FBI agents in California, according to officials. Sanford Wallace faces a prison sentence of up to 10 years, but has been released on bail.

According to BBC News, Mr Wallace developed a program which would post links on people's Facebook walls that appeared to be from the victim's friends. The system allowed him to gain access to around half a million Facebook accounts using an external site. A redirect to an affiliate site allowed him to earn "substantial revenue" from his actions.

The offense isn't the first time Mr Wallace has found himself in hot water. Following a 2009 court case, a judge ruled that Mr Wallace was barred from accessing Facebook, an order which prosecutors say was repeatedly breached. Previously, Mr Wallace was also in court over spamming messages to users of MySpace. The civil case took place in 2008, and Wallace lost.

Mr Wallace is being charged with three counts of intentional damage to a protected computer, six counts of electronic mail fraud and two counts of criminal contempt. Mr Wallace denies the charges, and has paid $100,000 to be released on bail.

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17 Comments

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The FBI will most likely hire him to do "special interest" projects with his hacking talents. Hacking is a highly prized skill. Al Hauffenburg did such just this year in July. Fake names won't save our data now.

If he turned himself into authorities then he would be the authorities and he could drop the charges.
I'm guessing that instead he turned himself in to authorities.

"a judge ruled that Mr Wallace was barred from accessing Facebook, an order which prosecutors say was repeatedly breached."

Kept real close tabs on him, didn't they?

Proof that it must not to hard to break into Facebook accounts and half the reason I don't use those type sites.

The other half of the reason is that they flat out stink!!

cork1958 said,
"a judge ruled that Mr Wallace was barred from accessing Facebook, an order which prosecutors say was repeatedly breached."

Kept real close tabs on him, didn't they?

Proof that it must not to hard to break into Facebook accounts and half the reason I don't use those type sites.

The other half of the reason is that they flat out stink!!

Its funny how so many people use FB when it stinks, also you do have to be somewhat stupid to get your account hacked. You have to click a link label:"Y O U T U B E" in a message with the same subject. How is that not obvious?

Neobond said,
$100,000 bail!? Wow, he must be rich from all that spamming

/me jelly


+1 He must have been i mean 100 Grand.. they should stop bail thingy

Neobond said,
$100,000 bail!? Wow, he must be rich from all that spamming

/me jelly

Yup, it sort of proves the charges, against him.

But a man of his capability( getting access to half a million fb accounts), could easily get a very well-paying job in a big tech firm. It's sad people like him prefer "other" methods to pay their bills.

dhruva said,

+1 He must have been i mean 100 Grand.. they should stop bail thingy

why stop? it's a substantial income to the government. besides, bail AND jail both! XD

Neobond said,
$100,000 bail!? Wow, he must be rich from all that spamming

/me jelly

It's only 10% of that. Have none of you bailed a friend out before lol. You only have to pay 10% of the bond to get that person out, so 10k

david said,

It's only 10% of that. Have none of you bailed a friend out before lol. You only have to pay 10% of the bond to get that person out, so 10k

A friend? Right...

david said,

It's only 10% of that. Have none of you bailed a friend out before lol. You only have to pay 10% of the bond to get that person out, so 10k

"and has paid $100,000 to be released on bail."
I assume it says he paid 100k, so that would put his bail at...1million? Doesn't seem all that unreasonable considering the crimes he's accused of committing.

Sotto_Zero said,

A friend? Right...

Yes, all my friends are not perfect like yours buddy. People go to jail, doesn't mean they are bit my friends. How ignorant can you be? Or do you have friends? (honest question, doesn't seem like it)

Sorry but you normalizing things doesn't mean they are normal. I never even heard any of my friends bailing one of their friends so its not as common as you think. This has nothing to do with ignorance.

david said,

Yes, all my friends are not perfect like yours buddy. People go to jail, doesn't mean they are bit my friends. How ignorant can you be? Or do you have friends? (honest question, doesn't seem like it)

[quote=basques said,]Sorry but you normalizing things doesn't mean they are normal. I never even heard any of my friends bailing one of their friends so its not as common as you think. This has nothing to do with ignorance.

[/quote

It's actually really common. Hence why bondsmans and bounty hunters exist. Step into reality.