Facebook sues "Mark Zuckerberg" - but not its CEO

We have heard about people who have legally changed their name to a product, a celebrity's name or even a fictional character in the past. Now it looks like one person's act of changing his name to match that of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg could bring some interesting legal issues along with it.

ZDnet reports that the whole story begins with Israeli resident named Rotem Guez who created a company called Likestore. This startup sells Likes on Facebook to advertisers. This actually violates Facebook's own policies but Guez's defense is that other US companies do basically the same thing he offers.

Guez then sued Facebook in July, claiming that the company wasn't going to return his Facebook profile to him. The problem? Facebook discovered that Guez was not only selling Likes, he was also creating false accounts on the service. In September, Facebook's attorney sent Guez a cease and desist letter for selling Likes on the service.

Guez then went to his native country's government to legally change his name to Mark Zuckerberg. He then established a new profile with his new name on Facebook which the service promptly disabled. It also sent a second cease and desist statement to Guez ... er, Zuckerberg.

This is obviously a huge publicity stunt on Guez's part. He knows he doesn't have a leg to stand on legally and now he's just being a gadfly with this move of "changing" his name to Mark Zuckerberg. The truth is he's going to lose this fight and it's going to cost him a lot more ultimately than the price he had to pay to change his legal name.

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It is a funny story. But it is now the trend to change your name to a name that profits you...

Like Chad Ochocinco......and here recently...Metta World Peace.

Why is it so easy to change the name? i'm sure there are some minimum requirements. fun story anyway.

sell likes: profit. trololol

BTW if anyone was wondering he payed 110 NIS to change his name + around 30-40 NIS for the passport picture he had to take for his new ID.

150 NIS = 39.57$

Did the same thing myself a couple of days ago ^^

Kai7os said,
BTW if anyone was wondering he payed 110 NIS to change his name + around 30-40 NIS for the passport picture he had to take for his new ID.

150 NIS = 39.57$

Did the same thing myself a couple of days ago ^^

are you mr. Zuckerberg version 3?

Kai7os said,
BTW if anyone was wondering he payed 110 NIS to change his name + around 30-40 NIS for the passport picture he had to take for his new ID.

150 NIS = 39.57$

Did the same thing myself a couple of days ago ^^

Oh well that's crystal clear now...

His argument is: If someone robs a bank and doesn't get caught, then I should be able to rob banks and not go to jail should I get caught. Just because others are out there violating rules doesn't mean its right and doesn't mean you should get a pass because the law isn't catching every single person violating the rules. He also soured it further by changing his name.

Nexus- said,
His argument is: If someone robs a bank and doesn't get caught, then I should be able to rob banks and not go to jail should I get caught. Just because others are out there violating rules doesn't mean its right and doesn't mean you should get a pass because the law isn't catching every single person violating the rules. He also soured it further by changing his name.
His argument is: If someone robs a bank and gets ignored/allowed to do so, then I should be able to rob banks and not go to jail should I get caught.

^ FTFY

Besides, robbing a bank and breaking a company's rules are entirely different matters. One is against the law, while the other is against the rules of a company (and in a separate country for that matter).
Facebook can ban his account from their service, stop him from accessing their service, but as long as he is not breaking any laws (and especially while he is in another country where Facebook does not have as much power), there is (well should be) nothing they can do to him (outside of their own service).

Wolfbane said,

Facebook can ban his account from their service, stop him from accessing their service, but as long as he is not breaking any laws (and especially while he is in another country where Facebook does not have as much power), there is (well should be) nothing they can do to him (outside of their own service).

You don't seem to understand the difference between a criminal case and a civil case.

jmc15john said,
He lives in Israel, who cares what Facebook thinks, they have no authority over what someone in another country does.

my teacher says the same thing about Teva

jmc15john said,
He lives in Israel, who cares what Facebook thinks, they have no authority over what someone in another country does.

Unless of course he is active on their website where they do have the authority to uphold their user-agreement/terms of use... They should also be able to sue him for breaking the terms of use just like any other contract.

I don't see why you'd say they have no say on these matters...

jmc15john said,
He lives in Israel, who cares what Facebook thinks, they have no authority over what someone in another country does.

Israel controls the America...so u know...

jmc15john said,
He lives in Israel, who cares what Facebook thinks, they have no authority over what someone in another country does.

You know that that multi-national companies exist, right?

Leonick said,

Unless of course he is active on their website where they do have the authority to uphold their user-agreement/terms of use... They should also be able to sue him for breaking the terms of use just like any other contract.

I don't see why you'd say they have no say on these matters...

Yes, but is it their terms of use that you cannot have the name Mark Zuckerberg? If not, (And it would be absurd if they did), then at least that account being closed could create some problems for Facebook... Especially considering countries tend to favor the party that resides in their country...

M_Lyons10 said,
Yes, but is it their terms of use that you cannot have the name Mark Zuckerberg? If not, (And it would be absurd if they did), then at least that account being closed could create some problems for Facebook... Especially considering countries tend to favor the party that resides in their country...
But, I imagine that it's in Facebook's User Agreement that people can be banned from the service for breaking the rules. He was banned under his real name, so he is still banned under his new, disingenuous-but-legal name.