Final major Android-Playbook update for Flash released

It's the end of an era for Adobe and its Flash Player software ... sort of. As announced earlier this week, the company has issued its last major update for the web browser version of Flash Player for the Android operating system along with Research in Motion's Blackberry Playbook tablet. The update, 11.1, is dedicated to fixing a number of bugs, mostly of the memory corruption variety.

While this is technically the final version of Flash Player for those platforms, Adobe has already confirmed via a blog post, "We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations." So people who have an Android smartphone shouldn't be too worried at this point that the Flash Player software will be totally abandoned.

Indeed, Computerworld.com points out that Adobe's Shockwave Player (Remember that? That takes us back a bit) was officially discontinued back in 2008 with the release of Shockwave Player 11. However, Adobe has continued to release security updates for that software ever since, including one this past week.

While Adobe plans to keep working on Flash Player for the PC platform as well as for the development of mobile applications (the company has confirmed that it is hard at work on Flash Player 12 as we speak), Adobe has already confirmed that as far as mobile web browsing, it will concentrate on the HTML5 platform for all future software development.

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14 Comments

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HTML5 is still in it's infancy thus problems such as these will remain until they can be fixed. Remember when Flash first came out, it had issues like what HTML5 has but overtime it was standardized and accepted by so many. Your argument about HTML5 being a trash technology is flawed. For one thing, it hasn't even been officialized yet so give it a break.

Julius Caro said,
They failed at mobile devices. Simple as that.

They fail period. Thing is, before HTML5, there wasn't any alternative to it.

PyX said,

They fail period. Thing is, before HTML5, there wasn't any alternative to it.

Have you even tried HTML5 video? It is 100% trash technology.

Join the YouTube HTML5 test thing if you aren't convinced.

Only goes to 720p, reloads itself when seeking, doesn't go full-screen.
And it is only playable using IE9, on Firefox it stutters.
None of these problems exist in Adobe Flash.

Aerah.Eleganta said,

Have you even tried HTML5 video? It is 100% trash technology.

Join the YouTube HTML5 test thing if you aren't convinced.

Only goes to 720p, reloads itself when seeking, doesn't go full-screen.
And it is only playable using IE9, on Firefox it stutters.
None of these problems exist in Adobe Flash.

I did have a few problems with YouTube in HTML5. But the standard is not even 100% complete, and obviously the browsers aren't done implementing it and fixing bugs. Some browsers still have bugs in their CSS2, javascript and HTML4 for God's sake… HTML5 is new and not even officialized, so give it a rest.

My point though was that we now have a universal alternative coming strong.

Aerah.Eleganta said,

Have you even tried HTML5 video? It is 100% trash technology.

Join the YouTube HTML5 test thing if you aren't convinced.

Only goes to 720p, reloads itself when seeking, doesn't go full-screen.
And it is only playable using IE9, on Firefox it stutters.
None of these problems exist in Adobe Flash.

HTML5 is still in it's infancy thus problems such as these will remain until they can be fixed. Remember when Flash first came out, it had issues like what HTML5 has but overtime it was standardized and accepted by so many. Your argument about HTML5 being a trash technology is flawed. For one thing, it hasn't even been officialized yet so give it a break.

Mohitster said,
I stopped reading here. Because guess what? It is not!

Yes it is, because it will not be updated nor supported anymore.

A lot of companies won't have the choice to remove it from their stock installations (you can't really put discontinued and unsupported software in there, can you?), and Adobe will end up removing it from their site sooner or later as well.

PyX said,

Yes it is, because it will not be updated nor supported anymore.

A lot of companies won't have the choice to remove it from their stock installations (you can't really put discontinued and unsupported software in there, can you?), and Adobe will end up removing it from their site sooner or later as well.


Wrong. The MOBILE version has been discontinued, but it'll still get bug fixes and security updates, in the exact same way that Shockwave is still updated.

Flash 12 is being developed for desktops/laptops/etc. as normal. Read the article.

testman said,
Wrong. The MOBILE version has been discontinued, but it'll still get bug fixes and security updates, in the exact same way that Shockwave is still updated.
Flash 12 is being developed for desktops/laptops/etc. as normal. Read the article.

Desktop is stagnant, Mobile is exploding. Writing is on the wall.

Kirkburn said,
So, yes ... it's the end of an era for Flash. An era of mobile development.

Dude have you even used Flash like ever!? Flash does not equal to mobile development only!! And how is development of Flash Player for mobile affects you or any mobile user is beyond me because in any case it was used only by 5% of the mobile users.....and even that can still be accomplished by using Adobe AIR based apps.....and HTML5 (in the near future if not now) which is what Adobe is targeting now by providing tools to develop both Adobe AIR based apps (for all the major mobile platforms)and HTML5 apps (platform independent) for the web using pretty much the same interface and the functionality we have known for long and got used to!

And as Mike Chambers (Veteran Flash developer & evangelist) puts it in two separate instances:

"We are actively working on the next version of Flash Professional and have a long term commitment to it's continued development."

"But, the bottom line is, if you need or want to use Flash Professional to create motion graphics or other content, you will be able to."

So yeah the statement "It is and end of an era for Flash" is beyond ridiculous in this space and time!

testman said,
[…] but it'll still get bug fixes and security updates

Different case, but then again discontinued is discontinued. It's a matter of time before it dies. Security patches and critical flaws patches won't save the day for Flash.

I predict that in 3 years from now, Flash is going to be completely dead on our mobile platforms and it'll start its downfall on our desktops, thanks to HTML5. Today is definitely the day it'll start its downfall though.

Mohitster, I did specifically say 'for mobile development [of Flash]'. It is the end of an era, for that.

I'm not implying Flash is going away completely, or that it isn't useful.