Firefox vulnerability fix available next week

Mozilla is set to release a Firefox bugfix next week, repairing a long-standing security flaw in the software. The 2.0.0.10 update is in testing right now and should be released to the public next week. "We are giving it a couple of days to make sure that there are no issues found and we'll release it after Thanksgiving," said Mike Schroepfer, Mozilla's vice president of engineering. Mozilla is calling on the Firefox community to test the browser during a quality assurance "testday" this Friday.

The issue was first reported last February by Jesse Ruderman, but it gained widespread attention earlier this month when researcher Petko Petkov pointed out on his blog that the flaw could be used to launch a cross-site scripting attack against the Firefox browser. The flaw has to do with the fact that Firefox does not properly check files that are compressed using the .jar (Java Archive) format. Attackers could sneak malicious code into the Jar-compressed documents, which would then be run by the victim.

News source: Computer World UK

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7 Comments

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You are confusing IP addresses with version numbers. If they went to 2.0.1.0 it would indicate that this was a feature release and not a bug fix.

Buttus said,
is it just me, or is 2.0.0.10 the same as 2.0.0.1? the zero at the end gets dropped...

Why would the zero at the end get dropped? The number ten is different from the number one ;)

backslash said,
You are confusing IP addresses with version numbers. If they went to 2.0.1.0 it would indicate that this was a feature release and not a bug fix.

No; if the third digit changed it would indicate a frozen API has changed - which could be due to a security fix that required an architectural change at such a level.

Buttus said,
is it just me, or is 2.0.0.10 the same as 2.0.0.1? the zero at the end gets dropped...

Welcome to the wonderful world of version numbers. Every company does it differently. In Mozilla's case, they don't just use 0-9. This is not new. the 1.x releases did this sort of thing as well.