First quad-core smartphone revealed?

Dual-core processors in smartphones are still a fairly recent hardware development, but if a new rumor at the Pocketnow.com web site is to be believed, it won't be long before the first quad-core processor-based smartphone will go on sale. The site reports that the first such phone could be the HTC Edge, and the article also has images reportedly of this upcoming product.

The massive 4.7 inch phone is going to have a number of high-end specifications including 1 GB of RAM, an eight megapixel camera, and 32 GB of internal storage space. The story claims that the HTC Edge will also be the first to contain NVIDIA's quad-core Tegra 3 processor, which is also known by its code name Kal-El. The story claims that the Tegra 3 will have four cores running at 1.5 GHz which should make the smartphone extremely speedy in terms of performance.

There's no word on what operating system might be running things on the HTC Edge but Android 4.0 would seem to be the best bet. We still have a lot of concerns about this device such as the price (we are betting this will be a very expensive phone) and most importantly what the battery life would be like with a quad-core smartphone. The article claims that the HTC Edge is still a few months away; it's due out either late in the first quarter of 2012 or early in the second quarter for next year.

Image via Pocketnow.com

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Xerino said,
But all and all... IT IS JUST A PHONE!!!

But all and all... YOU'RE NOT VERY IMAGINATIVE NOR FORWARD THINKING.

This is yet another step for advancing portable computing. With an advanced mobile GPU, 4 fast CPU cores, a slower, low-power 5th CPU core for low-power functionality and batter savings, nice screen with wireless and wired connectivity, 1 GB app memory, 32 GB internal storage + external expandability, etc, ... such an equipped device is NOT just a phone. This device could legitimately run both a mobile OS AND a desktop OS.

How nice it would be to have in ONE compact device a phone, a game machine, and a desktop hub. When hooked up to docking station and begins running either the mobile or desktop OS (or both), such a device will eliminate the need for many to invest in a notebook and also a fully equipped desktop. Tablets could be gutted and be made ridiculously light and thin and simply serve as a big touch-display/docking unit for such a device that would share its screen wired or wirelessly while accepting input from the touchscreen wired or wirelessly.

This will be the first of the Super Smart Phones, and, for now, will be well worth the price (probably $750 - $999) until the next generation disrupts things even further.

Xerino said,
But all and all... IT IS JUST A PHONE!!!

You don't say, and there was me thinking it was really a monkey riding a bicycle. Thanks for clearing that up.

Well, if it's up to Tim the dork from the "wp7 dual core editorial" more battery consumption in multiple core processors is nothing but mythical. So who cares about battery life as long as we get more cores shoved in a phone. LOL.

Pettor said,
Why do we never see any news about the "first smartphone with acceptable battery life revealed"?

Because a lot of smartphones have acceptable battery life? :-P

Just charge every night and you're fine...

Pettor said,
Why do we never see any news about the "first smartphone with acceptable battery life revealed"?

Disable data, put 2G network and done, u have a phone to talk and send SMS that lasts for 12 hour talk time or almost three weeks without talking.

Mobile phones stopped being "just" mobile phones a few years ago, bub. Time to get with the times. Remember that old mythical paradigm of device convergence the big companies have been trying to flog us for the last decade or so? It's finally arriving, and it's mobile.

And Windows Phone doesn't even support dual cores yet. That's got to put off prospective WP buyers surely.

Not really. Just think about how many people pay attention to the specs of their phone. The average user cares about how much space their phone will have, they don't bother looking and saying, "ooh, that one has a dual core processor, though!"

Joey S said,
And Windows Phone doesn't even support dual cores yet. That's got to put off prospective WP buyers surely.

Android doesn't have a half-decent UI yet. That's going to make prospective WP buyers rejoice.

england_fanboy said,

Android doesn't have a half-decent UI yet. That's going to make prospective WP buyers rejoice.

Yes, it does.

htcz said,

Yes, it does.

I agree with him, I've been though lots of ROM's and am yet to find a UI I am happy with. MIUI looked nice but just seems to be lacking somewhat.

Intrinsica said,
Is anyone else sensing a theme with england_fanboy's comments? I just can't put my finger on it...

The best bit is he signed up purely for that purpose. I wish there was an "ignore" button (seriously, is there?).

Intrinsica said,
Is anyone else sensing a theme with england_fanboy's comments? I just can't put my finger on it...

I just replied to most of his comments since he has no arguments.....

Intrinsica said,
Is anyone else sensing a theme with england_fanboy's comments? I just can't put my finger on it...

I thought he was being sarcastic

Actualy the current generation of smartphones, iPhone excluded, basically are pocketsized Linux computers able to make a phonecall..

The more cores, the lower the battery USAGE, a single task is spread and so the load on the battery isn't as great. Think of many resistors in parallel give a circuit less resistance than if they are all in series.

drazgoosh said,
The more cores, the lower the battery USAGE, a single task is spread and so the load on the battery isn't as great. Think of many resistors in parallel give a circuit less resistance than if they are all in series.

Interestingly enough, this is not entirely true. While multiple cores (provided the cpu arch allows it) can reduce power usage by making each individual core less consuming than the original single or dual-core and "turning off" unused cores, power (neglecting reality in the interest of simplicity) is affected more by current than by resistance. This being said, lowering the resistance increases the current through the system (not to mention more powerful cores require dramatically higher current, if not slightly higher voltages) and power can be simply estimated as I^2R. Reducing the resistance and increasing the current will overall increase the power draw, which is why high performance CPUs have much higher power ratings than the previous, however down-clocking and smaller architectures with more power control stepping and configurations have been trying to counter a constant high power draw. Relating the above to the analogy of more resistors in parallel decreasing resistance, those two resistors in parallel will draw more current together than the one resistor did alone, and adding more resistors into the parallel circuit will incrementally step up the power consumption.

This particular processor uses a single low power core for idle/low use applications, and will effectively disable the high performance quad core clocks under such conditions. At full load however, this CPU would till draw considerable power from the battery, regardless of how efficient the architecture attempts to be.

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