Free Microsoft Points offered to Japanese Xbox 360 gamers if they play online

Microsoft's Xbox 360 is highly successful in North America and Europe but, as we have noted before, Xbox has largely failed to make much of an impact in Japan, where Sony and Nintendo still rule. Now there's word that Microsoft is going to try to get Xbox 360 gamers to play more on their consoles.

Siliconera reports that, starting April 20th, Microsoft will launch the "Aim to Do It!" campaign in Japan. The campaign will run from April 20th to June 19th. In between those dates, Japanese Xbox 360 gamers are urged to play from a list of 20 Xbox 360 titles, including Halo 4, Forza Motorsport 4, Battlefield 3 and others.

If all of the Japanese gamers who play one or more of the titles on Microsoft's list reach a total of 300,000 game hours between them, each Xbox Live Gold member will get 100 free Microsoft Points, while free Xbox Live Silver members will get 10 free points. If that total amount of game hours reaches 500,000 before June 19th, all Gold members get 200 free points and Silver members get 20 free points.

If the Japanese Xbox 360 gamers manage to play a cumulative total of one million hours with that list of 20 games by the deadline, Gold members get 400 free Microsoft points and Silver members get 30 free points. It will be interesting to see if and when each milestone is reached, and whether the company's plan to stimulate more gameplay and boost enthusiasm among Japanese gamers actually succeeds.

Source: Siliconera | Image via Eurogamer.net

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true, but they have a new product launching at the end of the year, it's easier to keep a customer vs gain a new one. So if you can get the existing base fired up that's a start.

Offering free points to existing customers isn't going to do much to appeal to new customers. It certainly isn't going to do anything to help Microsoft's poor performance in Japan.