Further Windows 8 details announced, AllThingsD video available

Hot on the heels of the All Things D announcement earlier today, Microsoft has shown off Windows 8 again at Computex, showing a few features in full swing, and revealing more details. It appears that Microsoft has a lot more to show off then we expected.

The biggest surprise is that whilst Microsoft claimed that the immersive interface would be primarily used for tablets, they're showing it off on desktop PC's and conventional laptops too. It's not quite clear if that is the default, but its definitely an option. Instead of touch, the page up and down buttons allow you to navigate tiles and left and right to pan, as you would expect. In the image below, it shows PC's running the immersive UI, all the way down to a tiny tablet. We assume they're implying it's all on touch screen devices, but we've seen them demo some non-touch devices today too.

Microsoft showed that the new "immersive" UI can be run side-by-side by the conventional Windows shell, and the immersive UI is fully optimised for touch. The demo shows off new ways of managing files for touch based devices, but also shows that conventional file management is still available, too. If you look at the second screenshot below, the ribbon UI is enabled there, but slightly hidden. 

The demo showed off full USB support, even for ARM based devices, on a Dell device.

IE10 for tablet devices was also shown off, with the company touting tab management that looks almost exactly the same as the Windows Phone platform, and loads impressively fast. Microsoft is continuously emphasizing that the same version of Windows will run on all their devices.

The company reiterated it's SoC (System on a chip) device support in Windows 8, and showed off a tiny Snapdragon chip to show how small the things really are. They also pointed out that all applications that exist on Windows now will run on ARM devices, and showed off a super thin device sporting an nVidia quad-core chip named the "Kal-El."

Pictured above is a tablet device running the same nVidia chipset, able to perform heavy tasks such as HTML5 hardware accelerated support. Pictured below is Microsoft showing the same applications running on two different devices, an ARM based tablet and a desktop PC.

We heard earlier today that Microsoft was posing strict rules on Tablet OEM companies, and this seems to back it up, with the company saying they started engineering the systems with a "closer integration of hardware and software than ever." Sounds like a control process similar to WP7 to us. Tablet hardware requirements are a minimum of 1024x768, but 1366x768 required for "best" experience.

Microsoft also are pointing out that the exact edge of the device must be a sensor, so the sensitivity begins on the glass bezel for gestures. It's good to see Microsoft pushing OEM's to make good hardware, rather than taking a hands off approach.

At the end of the event, Microsoft again pushed "Build" in September, which will have "everything" about Windows 8. Make sure to put that one in your diaries now. Check out video of Windows 8 in action here, or further details from this mornings event at All Things D here. The video from the D9 event this morning is embedded below:


Image and coverage credit: Engadget

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This is the first time I've seen that UI in any form, and I love it. As long as MS can make sure that it is always that fluid (we all know how Windows slows down over time, and even the best running installation occasionally hangs for a moment or two) then it's onto a real winner.

My two concerns at the moment will only really be answered when I get my hands on the beta.
1. How will I integrate my normal work-flow into the new environment
2. How well does it work over multi screens

I guess I'll also be saving up for some touch monitors. I suspect that the market for after-market touch overlays will blossom.

Okay, so I'm getting a couple of distinct impressions on how this COULD go...

1) We may be seeing a replay of the whole Macintosh/IBM-PC kind of battle we saw back in the 80s. How so? We had a highly customizable MS-DOS environment, battling against a highly locked-down Macintosh environment. Now we're facing the "you run what we TELL you you can run" iPad against the "run what you want" Windows environment.

2) For years, Windows' strength has been its weakness: legacy support that's been the biggest contributor to bloat. I'd love to see Microsoft build a lightweight top layer that can run on its own without, say, COM support. Use a kind of Virtual XP runtime to support legacy, but ONLY FOR THE USERS WHO NEED IT. Make Windows modular, and then that lightweight layer can actually RUN on ARM-driven pads.

Microsoft has a big chance here. If they can build an appealing tablet that doesn't have to operate under the kind of constraints that the iPad does, they could get the market back.

I'm very Apple orientated because I like how they do things, but this looks like an awesome OS only thing I hope they fix tablet wine compared to whats on the market at the moment is the look like largeness. The iPad just looks awesome and feels awesome compared to the other tablets.

For tablets: Awesome, super, cool, handy
For PC: Doesn't fit, doesn't need it, won't be helpfull, not good

I hope we can disable it completely.

Waterflames1 said,
For tablets: Awesome, super, cool, handy
For PC: Doesn't fit, doesn't need it, won't be helpfull, not good

I hope we can disable it completely.

You can absolutely disable it. They showed on the other videos that even the tablet can use the file system (which is basically the normal desktop with start superbar/taskbar start menu button etc)

Great for tablets and so on.

Really don't see how this helps them on the desktop market though. Certainly puts me off ever using it on my PC.

This is all nice and all but...

I would really like to stop going "Next,Next,Next, Select Folder..., Next, Next, wait a few minutes, Finish." every time I want to install some trivial application and start doing some "drag and drop Installations" if you know what I mean *cof* osx *cof*

I would love to see a mix of Launchpad (from Lion) with the tiles.... DIRECTLY on the desktop (unlike the current implementations of both Lion and WIn8 which is a separate layer)

im sure there will be a windows 8 mouse on the way .
with wp7 and now w8 this has to be the best work ms has done in a long time.
will blow all competition out the water.

korupt_one said,
im sure there will be a windows 8 mouse on the way .
with wp7 and now w8 this has to be the best work ms has done in a long time.
will blow all competition out the water.

Too bad CNN and Engadget will work hastily to make sure that Apple-related coverage overshadows this event. Some news outlets have to make their money, you know.

I know the new UI is for tablets primarily, but it doesn't quite make sense for the UI to go left and right, when I would say that the majority of PC mice's scroll wheels go up/down and not left/right as well..

itsthenewDC said,
I know the new UI is for tablets primarily, but it doesn't quite make sense for the UI to go left and right, when I would say that the majority of PC mice's scroll wheels go up/down and not left/right as well..

+1

I preferred if it went up and down to instead of left and right. but then again my mouse has 2 scroll wheels on it. Vertical and Horizontal .
http://www.cyborggaming.com/imgs/rat7_left.png

Ci7 said,
i get the impression that classic UI would be dropped for good now.

hoorah!

Why would the classic UI be dropped? You still need precision work in Office, photo processing, file management, etc...

KingCrimson said,

Why would the classic UI be dropped? You still need precision work in Office, photo processing, file management, etc...

Windows Classic != "Classic" Traditional UI

blade1269 said,
Am I the only one who hates the tiles. I don't want a big WP7.

Well, we're sorry, we'll call off the mad gunmen who were planning on coming to your house to force you to buy it.

Seems like a great tablet system, but honestly, this seems a bit ridiculous for the standard keyboard and mouse desktop.

And if the aim is to get people to use touch screens all the time (i.e. not just handheld slates or mostly horizontal surfaces), then they've totally missed the point.

MS Lose32 said,
The future is monochrome rectangles! Yeah!!! 2D FTW!!!

What would you prefer, wobbly windows and spinning cubes? Pass. Its an OS, not a video game. Note that nobody's putting a gun to your head, the older style UI is still there.

Another Windows release - another "forget everything" type of approach. Why Microsoft forgets their "cool" stuff they sold just 4 years ago? Where is e.g. WPF? Where is Aero? Do they really believe devs will be able to code decent apps using just HTML5/JS/CSS3?

For tablets it's great. If windows 8 can run just as fast on arm as Android I can't think a good reason of buying an android tablet. Don't get me wrong, android is great but how can it compete with an equaly great OS that can run MS Office?

I love linux, I love my bada phone and probably won't go near a windows phone. But If I am to buy a tablet I sure as hell choose one that can run windows 8.

menes said,
For tablets it's great. If windows 8 can run just as fast on arm as Android I can't think a good reason of buying an android tablet. Don't get me wrong, android is great but how can it compete with an equaly great OS that can run MS Office?

I love linux, I love my bada phone and probably won't go near a windows phone. But If I am to buy a tablet I sure as hell choose one that can run windows 8.

I just got my HTC Trophy WP7... It is nothing like Windows Mobile... It is ultra fast and fluid with no stupid hiccups I've seen on other phones and more personal and rich experience over iOS. Before you knock it go check one out at AT&T (Samsung Focus) or Verizon (HTC Trophy)... I finally was able to ditch my CrapBerry, iOS is nice and fast but very generic in my opinion with just a bunch of stupid icons and the 1 button crap is irritating. I don't like Google at all for anything, but I do love Linux... On the other hand if you want anything ruined and dumbed down then give it to Google. They don't innovate, they poorly replicate and move us backwards. Their fragmentation of devices as well malware constantly hitting their marketplace I would surely pass and with Google built in spyware they can KMA.

I can't wait for Windows 8! This is going to be huge!

Thinking about how the xbox interface shares various similarities to this, I think this interface will be excellent on televisions as well! Great stuff.

fardeen said,
am i the only person who think it sucks for desktop users???

Desktop users will choose the classical Windows 7 UI if they want. Every customer, business or consumer or whatever, will choose the UI they like most. This is a great advantage since the ubiquity of this version of Windows.

DaveGreen said,

Desktop users will choose the classical Windows 7 UI if they want. Every customer, business or consumer or whatever, will choose the UI they like most. This is a great advantage since the ubiquity of this version of Windows.

And that is, in fact, the major advantage the various iterations of 8 bring to the table, despite seemingly-dissimilar architectures, such as x86 and ARM. It's basically Windows NT all over again.

This will be another epic fail for Microsoft, at least on dekstop when they make this default UI. Everyone will revert to old style W7 taskbar.

6205 said,
This will be another epic fail for Microsoft, at least on dekstop when they make this default UI. Everyone will revert to old style W7 taskbar.

Ok, are you Steve from Apple or Eric from Google?

6205 said,
This will be another epic fail for Microsoft, at least on dekstop when they make this default UI. Everyone will revert to old style W7 taskbar.

Well.. I guess this touch-optimized UI won't be the defualt of all the "Windows 8" PCs.

According to the interview of Steven Sinofsky and "Build" Conference Webpage, this UI is mainly for tablets and the two sources both stress "no compromise", which impress me that Microsoft aims to make your tablet pc finger-friendly on the go and return to a traditional Windows Laptop when you plug mouse and keyboard in.

Besides, if that's the defualt for all, then the whole UI changes in the leaks before are meaningless. They just need to copy what Windows 7 have (maybe make some minor fixes) and all is done. Wait to Build Conference in Sep. and we can know more.

6205 said,
This will be another epic fail for Microsoft, at least on dekstop when they make this default UI. Everyone will revert to old style W7 taskbar.

I simply must hire you to help me buy stocks then, seeing as you can obviously see the future somehow.

6205 said,
This will be another epic fail for Microsoft, at least on dekstop when they make this default UI. Everyone will revert to old style W7 taskbar.

Which has gone exactly nowhere. It's still there, and can be the default instead of immersive (as is the case on the leaked build 7955 and 7959). So no, it's not even close to being a fail.

Strike X said,
Copy from Windows Media Center!

So it seem like next generation of windows will be Windows Media Center style?


Microsoft can't exactly copy from themselves can they, they took the media center concept, chucked in a bit of Metro and out comes Immersive.

ahhell said,

The Chromebook is a stupid idea anyway.

Yeah and it always has been, who the hell wants a OS that only works when on the internet?!

thenetavenger said,

For once everyone can answer, Yes, Yes it does...

it won't

even if it run , crysis is cpu powerhog

/fail

;o

Mephistopheles said,
What we see here is Microsoft out-innovating Apple. Rather impressive.

I do not think that Apple will stand still...... The IOS GUI is getting old and I am quite sure they are also working to revamp it.

2012 will be an interesting year.

Mephistopheles said,
What we see here is Microsoft out-innovating Apple. Rather impressive.

This isn't slated for release until 2012-2013, you really think Apple will sit still in the meantime? You can't expect a company to come up with a new hit every single year.

Julius Caro said,
everybody seems to be happy, except for intel!

2- intel open thier bank
3-buyout ARM
4-profit
5-????
5- antitrust lawsuit!
6-intel broken apart

/jk

PC, PC Touch, Notebook, Notebook Touch and Tablet How much $$$? I want notebook w/ touch device. Are Flash and Silverlight support them? Damn iPad and iPad 2 hate Adobe

calimike said,
PC, PC Touch, Notebook, Notebook Touch and Tablet How much $$? I want notebook w/ touch device. Are Flash and Silverlight support them? Damn iPad and iPad 2 hate Adobe

It's still Windows, it'll run all of that just like Win7 does today.

Well this should give Apple some push to finally get iOS up to the level of OS X and get OS X to the usability of iOS.

I don't think many in the industry were expecting Microsoft to pull this off, even though they demonstrated Windows 8 on an ARM device earlier, and it was running x86 applications.

The thing that might have had people thinking Microsoft was doing a dual OS or a bait and switch was that they demoed Win8 on an ARM device that was lower powered than an iPad and yet running heavy applications on it far smoother than native iOS applications can run on this level of device, especially when you add in they were also running heavy x86 applications and they looked too fast and too native.

As I have posted before, Microsoft has been doing low powered devices, translation technologies, and able to easily port NT and also optimize NT to a rather light level in terms of today's computing power far too easily. This isn't their first shift and they have done this before. When NT was being developed the sounds from the technology crowd was that Microsoft would NOT be able to pull off all the technologies in NT, especially when they kept adding on requirements and features that were 'heavy' at the time and many that were still theory, as they hadn't been used outside of a few niche custom OS projects.

And NT surprised the world back then, by not only doing what they said, but doing it rather well and competing with their own assembly optimized Windows OS (Win9x) and able to perform better than most x86 based *nixes and also handle server loads that specialized Novell servers were strictly designed for doing and only doing a few things to get that level of performance.

So here we are 20 years later, and Microsoft produces something the world didn't think was possible, and underestimated Microsoft once again...

thenetavenger said,
Well this should give Apple some push to finally get iOS up to the level of OS X and get OS X to the usability of iOS.

I don't think many in the industry were expecting Microsoft to pull this off, even though they demonstrated Windows 8 on an ARM device earlier, and it was running x86 applications.

The thing that might have had people thinking Microsoft was doing a dual OS or a bait and switch was that they demoed Win8 on an ARM device that was lower powered than an iPad and yet running heavy applications on it far smoother than native iOS applications can run on this level of device, especially when you add in they were also running heavy x86 applications and they looked too fast and too native.

As I have posted before, Microsoft has been doing low powered devices, translation technologies, and able to easily port NT and also optimize NT to a rather light level in terms of today's computing power far too easily. This isn't their first shift and they have done this before. When NT was being developed the sounds from the technology crowd was that Microsoft would NOT be able to pull off all the technologies in NT, especially when they kept adding on requirements and features that were 'heavy' at the time and many that were still theory, as they hadn't been used outside of a few niche custom OS projects.

And NT surprised the world back then, by not only doing what they said, but doing it rather well and competing with their own assembly optimized Windows OS (Win9x) and able to perform better than most x86 based *nixes and also handle server loads that specialized Novell servers were strictly designed for doing and only doing a few things to get that level of performance.

So here we are 20 years later, and Microsoft produces something the world didn't think was possible, and underestimated Microsoft once again...

If they weren't expecting it, they should have - this is not new territory for Microsoft, as you and I both pointed out earlier in the thread, with a lot higher stakes - the business-targeted (at the time) Windows NT Workstation and Server were multi-platform from the beginning. NEC (MIPS), Digital (Alpha AXP) and even IBM (POWER) sold x86 and non-x86 NT PCs side by side. And NT on RISC had little to no difference from a user perspective compared to NT on x86 - the initial Microsoft *train the trainer* workshops were largely using DEC Alpha-powered workstations and servers. And even that difference - non-x86 hardware supported CD-based booting, especially from CD-ROM, before x86 NT did, was, in fact, gone with NT 3.51. The problem with NT's non-x86 architectures had nothing whatever to do with how well NT ran on said architecture - NT, pretty much, ran better on non-x86 vs. x86 when the application was native; often, significantly better. (A major niche that DEC's Alpha AXP carved out for itself was customized NT-based scientific applications, used mostly by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, running on NT-powered DEC Alpha AXP workstations.) NT 3.51 vs. even Windows for Workgroups (which was no slouch) trumped it, and made it look easy, on identical hardware. (That, in and of itself, spoke volumes about NT robustness.) The failing of non-x86 was due to price, not performance - there was a hefty premium to be paid for running NT on non-x86 hardware in terms of hardware cost. Not coding issues, or even lack of power - simple bang-for-buck pricing.

The woman on the show seemed kind of clueless - asking about why Office looks the same. Hello! It's a program for creating documents and databases! Plus, this is a Windows showcase, not an Office one.

devHead said,
The woman on the show seemed kind of clueless - asking about why Office looks the same. Hello! It's a program for creating documents and databases! Plus, this is a Windows showcase, not an Office one.

She has NO clue what is going on.Doubt if she has ever used a computer at all.

devHead said,
The woman on the show seemed kind of clueless - asking about why Office looks the same. Hello! It's a program for creating documents and databases! Plus, this is a Windows showcase, not an Office one.

The past part of it: They obviously showed Office2010 - how's that gonna magically change to a new UI?

devHead said,
The woman on the show seemed kind of clueless - asking about why Office looks the same. Hello! It's a program for creating documents and databases! Plus, this is a Windows showcase, not an Office one.

Also, why change what largely isn't broken?

Other than adding x64-based applications, including several x64-specific SKUs, Office 2010's applications themselves (with the exception of Outlook) changed very little from a user perspective compared to Office 2007, if not 2003. (While Outlook changed a ton, it was also the odd duck from a UI/user perspective out of all of Office.) Outside of Outlook (due to the changes in the UI), there was literally no migration curve. (The migration curve, while small, from 2003 to 2007, was steeper, and from Office 97 to Office 2000 was steeper yet.)

In transitioning to ARM, what would be obvious from a user POV? Pretty much nothing. There is far more commonality between 8 on ARM and 8 on the larger processors of today than between iOS and OS X (or between Android and Chrome OS/Chromium, for that matter). In addition, this isn't new territory, even for Microsoft; in case you need reminding, the original Windows NT *began* as a multi-platform OS (different processors other than x86 were supported by the first four iterations of the desktop and server OS versions - MIPS, Alpha AXP, even IBM's original POWER RISC processor, were all supported, in addition to standard x86). This is closer to Apple's transition from POWER to x86, with the exception that x86 isn't going away.

You guys remember that WOW campaign for Windows Vista? Umm I think they used it like 5 years too soon. THIS MAKES ME GO WOW!!!!!

KingCrimson said,
Spring 2012, I can see myself getting a Samsung Windows 8 tablet!

If Microsoft push for a Fall launch I will explode, they simply can't wait that long to get a tablet experience out to consumers.

The way they are touting all these products running on a beta operating system...is telling me that they are confident enough to release the final Windows 8 way sooner than what people are predicting.

primexx said,
why the hell would they optimize for 16:9?!?!

I like it. A lot better video experience in my opinion (more than a certain Apple product).

primexx said,
why the hell would they optimize for 16:9?!?!

It's the standard display format for darn near every landscape display. Even netbooks, tablets, and smartphones use a variant of either 16:9 and 16:10, usually a portrait version for smartphones, and a landscape version for tablets and netbooks - touch or non. Even better, it scales up and down to not just smartphone displays, but projections, even a Jumbotron or Diamondtron display, if that floats your boat. While there *are* 4:3 FP displays, they are far from common.

PGHammer said,

It's the standard display format for darn near every landscape display. Even netbooks, tablets, and smartphones use a variant of either 16:9 and 16:10, usually a portrait version for smartphones, and a landscape version for tablets and netbooks - touch or non. Even better, it scales up and down to not just smartphone displays, but projections, even a Jumbotron or Diamondtron display, if that floats your boat. While there *are* 4:3 FP displays, they are far from common.


4:3 is the best ratio for a tablet, but even keeping a widescreen resolution 16:10 is much better than 16:9.
A 16:9 tablet is just stupid, I hope different ratios will be supported.

primexx said,
why the hell would they optimize for 16:9?!?!

It's optimized for 16:9 but the touch experience will also run 1024x768. Happy now?

primexx said,
why the hell would they optimize for 16:9?!?!

16:9 is the standard now for screens and, generically, for displays. Every movie or every tv serial fit well with those proportions. The 4:3 old TV format is even unnatural since we are used to look widely with our eyes.

pdg said,

4:3 is the best ratio for a tablet, but even keeping a widescreen resolution 16:10 is much better than 16:9.
A 16:9 tablet is just stupid, I hope different ratios will be supported.

That's funny - the iPad 2 is 16:9, as is the original iPad (landscape mode), and it sells like gangbusters. Most e-readers (including Kindle and Nook) use a portrait orientation of the same sort of display (hence 9:16). Tablets are generally either-or (landscape or portrait, rotatable to suit the user preference) - both Kindle and Nook use a portrait display deliberately - as that is the typical format for the paper books and/or magazines they are looking to obsolesce (however, it would not surprise me if a landscape mode for either, or both, wasn't a third-party option, if not standard by default).

No word on Kinect integration right now. I don't think Microsoft has any real competition after this.

This is going to be so awesome! Can't wait to try it out on my Tablet PC!
I'm pretty sure I'll leave it in classic UI mode on my desktop though. No need to have giant fonts and little information displayed on my 23" monitor without touch.

mrp04 said,
This is going to be so awesome! Can't wait to try it out on my Tablet PC!
I'm pretty sure I'll leave it in classic UI mode on my desktop though. No need to have giant fonts and little information displayed on my 23" monitor without touch.

The *immersive UI* is one that a lot of us have seen before. Not on a smartphone or tablet, either - it's the Windows Media Center UI (specifically, Windows Media Center 2.0, as included with 7 Home Premium and above). That is also why the optimization for 16:9 and 16:10, that is the typical formfactor these days for laptops, larger-screen (anything 15" and larger) notebooks, and any new *desktop* display (not to mention that, as I pointed out, it's the default optimization for Windows Media Center, which the new UI has as it's ancestor). 4:3 is for legacy laptops and CRTs - not even netbooks or tablets use that screen formfactor today. (Most of those use either a portrait-based 9:16 or 10:16 display, or a landscape (thus 16:9 or 16:10) display. You *can* use the immersive-UI on a 4:3 display (again, this is doable with Windows Media Center today); however, that is best done windowed, not full-screen.

PGHammer said,

The *immersive UI* is one that a lot of us have seen before. Not on a smartphone or tablet, either - it's the Windows Media Center UI (specifically, Windows Media Center 2.0, as included with 7 Home Premium and above). That is also why the optimization for 16:9 and 16:10, that is the typical formfactor these days for laptops, larger-screen (anything 15" and larger) notebooks, and any new *desktop* display (not to mention that, as I pointed out, it's the default optimization for Windows Media Center, which the new UI has as it's ancestor). 4:3 is for legacy laptops and CRTs - not even netbooks or tablets use that screen formfactor today. (Most of those use either a portrait-based 9:16 or 10:16 display, or a landscape (thus 16:9 or 16:10) display. You *can* use the immersive-UI on a 4:3 display (again, this is doable with Windows Media Center today); however, that is best done windowed, not full-screen.


You in fact can use the new Immersive UI on a 4:3 aspect ratio; 1024x768 to be exact. Anything lower however won't work.

I'd like to see some type of gesture to show me all the apps I am running at the time. If I have 10 or so apps running at the same time, a simple expose'-like feature would be great instead of having to swipe through all of them to find the one I want.

srprimeaux said,
I'd like to see some type of gesture to show me all the apps I am running at the time. If I have 10 or so apps running at the same time, a simple expose'-like feature would be great instead of having to swipe through all of them to find the one I want.

I bet they'll have something, it makes sense to, still early into the development.

srprimeaux said,
I'd like to see some type of gesture to show me all the apps I am running at the time. If I have 10 or so apps running at the same time, a simple expose'-like feature would be great instead of having to swipe through all of them to find the one I want.

Considering Windows has had a variaition of exactly what you ask for since at least 2001, and not even including the taskbar concept going back to the 90s, I don't think they will dump the concept just because they didn't show it in a video.

And why do you reference Expose, when you could reference the Windows concept? Expose is just a pretty/animated version of the XP Powertoy Microsoft released that displays the actual Window in the Task Switcher. Also, Vista and Win7 use both the Taskbar and Flip3D (as well as about 50 3rd party programs that mimic Expose as well as add other new concepts) - which again makes me wonder why you reference Expose when talking about Windows? Seriously?

srprimeaux said,
I'd like to see some type of gesture to show me all the apps I am running at the time. If I have 10 or so apps running at the same time, a simple expose'-like feature would be great instead of having to swipe through all of them to find the one I want.

A two fingered swipe from the left would be perfect for that.

thenetavenger said,
Considering Windows has had a variaition of exactly what you ask for since at least 2001, and not even including the taskbar concept going back to the 90s, I don't think they will dump the concept just because they didn't show it in a video.

I hope so, but the taskbar doesn't show me all of my windows/applications I have running at the same time (like expose does).

thenetavenger said,
And why do you reference Expose, when you could reference the Windows concept? Expose is just a pretty/animated version of the XP Powertoy Microsoft released that displays the actual Window in the Task Switcher. Also, Vista and Win7 use both the Taskbar and Flip3D (as well as about 50 3rd party programs that mimic Expose as well as add other new concepts) - which again makes me wonder why you reference Expose when talking about Windows? Seriously?

Because expose is the first thing that came to my mind? What's your problem? Plus, with Flip3D, guess what I have to do? Swipe through all the windows/apps to find the one I want. That's tedious. And I don't want to have to download 3rd party applications to mimic a feature that should've been part of the OS to begin with.

srprimeaux said,
I'd like to see some type of gesture to show me all the apps I am running at the time. If I have 10 or so apps running at the same time, a simple expose'-like feature would be great instead of having to swipe through all of them to find the one I want.

I'm sure a task manager / expose` type thing is coming. Its not completely baked and they don't want to show you the half baked parts yet.

Nexus- said,

I'm sure a task manager / expose` type thing is coming. Its not completely baked and they don't want to show you the half baked parts yet.

I hope so, but I've been let down before by Microsoft. For example, I thought sure enough they'd place a native spell-checker into IE9. People told me, "It's still in development. I'm sure they'll put one when it's released." Well, I'm stuck with a third-party alternative that works sporadically.

But we'll see how this goes.

Nexus- said,

I'm sure a task manager / expose` type thing is coming. Its not completely baked and they don't want to show you the half baked parts yet.

I hope so, but I've been let down before by Microsoft. For example, I thought sure enough they'd place a native spell-checker into IE9. People told me, "It's still in development. I'm sure they'll put one when it's released." Well, I'm stuck with a third-party alternative that works sporadically.

But we'll see how this goes.

Eric Schmidt may think that Microsoft isn't innovative but it sure looks like their doing a good job widing the amount of devices that operating system can be ran on.

Biglo said,
Eric Schmidt may think that Microsoft isn't innovative but it sure looks like their doing a good job widing the amount of devices that operating system can be ran on.

So much for Microsoft getting left in the dust when ARM becomes more popular.

I want to see the file system work on touch. I really dont' like the legacy apps look next to the new look, it reminds me of the Windows 7 approach to touch which is not good enough. I hope to see the Win 8 optimized apps make a real difference. Interesting overall, and risky is a good word Ballmer used to describe it. My question is how will Grandma do on it? Is it too much to think about? Swiping up and over and all that? Lets give it some more time and see.

jimmyfal said,
I want to see the file system work on touch. I really dont' like the legacy apps look next to the new look, it reminds me of the Windows 7 approach to touch which is not good enough. I hope to see the Win 8 optimized apps make a real difference. Interesting overall, and risky is a good word Ballmer used to describe it. My question is how will Grandma do on it? Is it too much to think about? Swiping up and over and all that? Lets give it some more time and see.

Probably easier for Grandma to find what she uses most often with the large tiles vs those teeny-tiny icons on iOS.

jimmyfal said,
I want to see the file system work on touch. I really dont' like the legacy apps look next to the new look, it reminds me of the Windows 7 approach to touch which is not good enough. I hope to see the Win 8 optimized apps make a real difference. Interesting overall, and risky is a good word Ballmer used to describe it. My question is how will Grandma do on it? Is it too much to think about? Swiping up and over and all that? Lets give it some more time and see.

You do mean the file system touch UI, right? As for the Win7 touch 'Explorer' UI, it works well with touch if you enlarge the icons (if needed) and turn on the 'check boxes' option, and if you want, the single click button, instead of needing a double click, this allows you to click through and select items almost exactly like you would the Gallery on Android or many other touch type UIs, and it is already in Win7 (and has been in there since at least Vista, can't remember if TabletPC XP edition had the checkboxes.)

I don't know if Microsoft would implement a full Explorer UI for touch, as the idea of touch and the 'abstraction' UI that it presents is to remove the concept of folders and directory trees from users once and for all, and the UI will just present all relevant items as needed if done anything like they have pushed for since trying to shove people away from 'file system' concepts for several years now. It was hard enough to get users to stop saving Word documents in the Winword/Office folder and put them in a 'Document' location, so this is just another shove to getting users to give up the 'file manager' concepts of the past and move to a future where information is just available and associated without concepts like 'folder/directories' and people are no longer 'hunting' for items on their computer, instead the OS is automating the filing and storage at a conceptual level users no longer have to deal with something so mundane. Just like launching a .doc file was a shove in the PC world to have users double click on the 'document' instead of opening Word and then selecting 'File-Open' and digging for the document.

Make sense? Also use the Win7 tips, you can play with the Explorer settings and get the folder and document behavior to act like your favorite touch UI app on Android or iOS if you just select the settings to mimic the functionality you expect. (Which is one reason I about spit when people say Win7 doesn't do touch well, when we have users that are as fluid with only touch on Win7 as they are on Android/Honeycomb or iOS by just adjusting the settings to work like they want.)
Seriously...

OMG... the video is awesome. Totally kills it! the fluidity the motion, its great. If the swipy features get incorporated into WP7 it will be a wet dream come true Really pleased with the way its looking. The switching between apps/processes was really quick and the snap feature looks great too. Not sure if other tablets have those features so its something new.

Billy Gun said,
Time to buy ARM Stocks!

Why not Microsoft stock? I think history will repeat itself. Apple will fall, Microsoft will get to the top. There must be emergency meeting going on in Apple and Google right now.

FMH said,

Why not Microsoft stock? I think history will repeat itself. Apple will fall, Microsoft will get to the top. There must be emergency meeting going on in Apple and Google right now.

i will this summer. im perfectly happy if it reaches only 27$ and i have no doubt that it will...just that its always great if it would go higher xD

FMH said,

Why not Microsoft stock? I think history will repeat itself. Apple will fall, Microsoft will get to the top. There must be emergency meeting going on in Apple and Google right now.

For the first time in a LONG time I think MSFT is headed in the right direction. I wouldn't be surprised to see MSFT at $50 by year's end.

FMH said,

Why not Microsoft stock? I think history will repeat itself. Apple will fall, Microsoft will get to the top. There must be emergency meeting going on in Apple and Google right now.

Good thing I'm already a MSFT stockholder (and have been for a few years now - I bought when Vista went RTM). The immersive UI is actually something that we've seen before, just not OS-wide (Windows Media Center 2.0, which is included with Windows 7). The use of the arrow keys for navigation (non-touch devices) is also lifted directly from WMC2. Basically, if you've used Windows Media Center at all, the immersive UI is navigable the same way. What I like is that it's an option for non-touch formfactors, including desktops (and it should be, due to the WMC2-based underpinnings). JimmyFal, the problem with Windows 7 and touch is the same reason touch has issues elsewhere - a truly touch-based OS requires all the applications to be designed for it. (The same has been true with mouse-based UIs, going all the way back to the earliest days of Windows and MacOS. Even today, there are folks that *loathe* mousing around both Windows and MacOS (even Windows 7/8 and Snow Leopard/Lion) - they insist on their keyboard shortcuts. Fully-touch-based won't happen for the same reason truly-mouse-based hasn't happened yet - too many users would complain.)

FMH said,

Why not Microsoft stock? I think history will repeat itself. Apple will fall, Microsoft will get to the top. There must be emergency meeting going on in Apple and Google right now.
Sure buddy... FYI: Apple hates Google right now more than it hates Microsoft.

wixostrix said,

what does that mean?

"Quoted For Truth". Field Commander was basically "+1"ing you on your 1st comment.

wixostrix said,
ARM devices will run all Windows applications. This is a total win!

Indeed, can't wait to get my hands on a device. Caveat though, it'll run all Windows applications that were compiled for ARM or built against dotNET. The processor isn't x86 compatible.

kizuran said,

"Quoted For Truth". Field Commander was basically "+1"ing you on your 1st comment.

oh okay. see, learn something new everyday lol

and thanx for the clarification

wixostrix said,
ARM devices will run all Windows applications. This is a total win!

actually its all with an asterisk, because they do need to be recompiled by the developer. The average user who uses a computer for email, angry birds, web, office, etc. will not notice a difference. When you want to run older programs that haven't been recompiled you will run into the same problem as running a 16bit app on x64

kizuran said,

"Quoted For Truth". Field Commander was basically "+1"ing you on your 1st comment.

Can also mean "Quite fu**ing true" as well.

Eddie ELZ said,
Can't wait for this to be released! Looks great so far!

I actually cant wait for what will happen a lot sooner: the people who made neowin popular, the windows themers, will write up an app that does most of the features of the new start screen. The live tiles, weather, stocks, and rss apps, and file browser shouldn't require too much effort. The deep integration with the classic 7 desktop, and the social features would be a bit harder, but most (including myself) would settle for the basics.

I know a lot of tech bloggers are going to poo on the new UI because yes, it is just a glorified skin or launcher, however 1 its a step up from 7, and 2 considering what we could have gotten released for windows 8 (vista or worse Microsoft does have a record for a poor release every once in a while) it could have been much worse.
I was highly annoyed by Kara Swisher asking about office for the new UI. These are windows guys they asked to come out. That and MS has nothing to announce yet for office. Next release or release after could totally mesh with the new UI but again they aren't there yet. You could tell sinofsky was wanting to tape her mouth shut with that line of questioning.

Walt Mossberg is like skeptical "What is this ****ing bulls" the whole time and putting down Julie. Tsk tsk...****ing applites are pathetic at the present of awsomeness.

Nexus- said,

I know a lot of tech bloggers are going to poo on the new UI because yes, it is just a glorified skin or launcher, however 1 its a step up from 7, and 2 considering what we could have gotten released for windows 8 (vista or worse Microsoft does have a record for a poor release every once in a while) it could have been much worse.
I was highly annoyed by Kara Swisher asking about office for the new UI.

1) All OS interfaces are essentially just glorified launchers and overlays, for tech bloggers to reduce it to this type of argument would really make them look foolish; although, you are probably right and some will try to make a false distinction.

2) The Office UI questions were probably not really directed at the right people, but there is a bit of history that would present this as a valid set of questions. When Microsoft developed the TabletPC concept, the initial Office release started to add full support for the concept with even handwritten text having the flow and characteristics of text, with more TabletPC and Ink support promised in future releases. However the (silly) product manage for Office at the time instead relegated the pro-ink/Tablet people over to OneNote as a separate product and removed a lot of the beauty of handwriting and other inherent TabletPC features from Word and Excel. This single move stopped a lot of Tablet and Ink work in Microsoft and adoption by Microsoft corporate customers. So the Office Team is important, and they had 'better' be on board this time around, which I think they 'finally' get it and don't have the same goof managing the team.

They shouldn't expect a full Office experience using touch alone, if anything they will do what they did with WP7 and develop a usable touch experience but not include ever single feature found in the desktop version. The best of both worlds if you wish.

flexkeyboard said,
Walt Mossberg is like skeptical "What is this ****ing bulls" the whole time and putting down Julie. Tsk tsk...****ing applites are pathetic at the present of awsomeness.

That's what I was thinking... Great stuff I find and a great way to go forward with Windows.