Gallery: Windows 8 RTM installation screenshots

After Microsoft announced that Windows 8 had hit RTM and that the platform would be rolling out to developer channels in the near future, it was only a matter of time until the RTM landed in more hands so that we can get a closer look at the new OS. While there are not many changes to the installation process, there are a few subtle differences from the preview builds that Microsoft released earlier this year. 

If you have not seen what the Windows 8 install process looks like, we have posted a gallery below for you to admire until October 26th when Windows 8 will hit retail shelves. The pictures come courtesy of darrenwbaker.com and there are quite a few to look over.

As a reminder, you can get Windows 8 starting on October 26th either by upgrading for $39.99 or with the purchase of a new PC. If  you buy an eligible Windows 7 PC today, you will be able to purchase an upgrade to Windows 8 Pro for $14.99 (U.S.) through the Windows Upgrade Offer.

Source: Darrenwbaker.com

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smooth3006 said,
they should of ditched metro for non touchscreens.

What's the point of trying to unify the UI accross all device types if you leave it out of one group? That's counter to what MS wants to do.

GP007 said,

What's the point of trying to unify the UI accross all device types if you leave it out of one group? That's counter to what MS wants to do.

You would make people productive.

Mr. Dee said,

You would make people productive.

Which is something that's still possible and I think overblown by some, the start screen hardly effects me and how I do my work on the desktop mostly because since I started using Windows 7 I've also started to use the start menu less and less. I've got 15 of my most used apps pinned right to the taskbar, the same will be the case even on Windows 8. For the few seconds I hit winkey and type out the name of a app that's not pinned, to see the start screen isn't as big of a problem or a break in workflow to me.

I don't see production dropping, the start screen can be mostly ignored if you take advantage of the taskbar more.

GP007 said,

What's the point of trying to unify the UI accross all device types if you leave it out of one group? That's counter to what MS wants to do.

metro isn't productive what so ever.

smooth3006 said,
metro isn't productive what so ever.

For grandma trying to get her pictures off her camera on to the facebooks it is.

Just because you can't tile 1000s of windows doesn't mean that productivity will be improved for those with no formal computer (aka legacy windows) training.

deadonthefloor said,

For grandma trying to get her pictures off her camera on to the facebooks it is.

Just because you can't tile 1000s of windows doesn't mean that productivity will be improved for those with no formal computer (aka legacy windows) training.

im not going to argue other than saying ill be waiting for this OS to fall flat on it's rear.

smooth3006 said,

metro isn't productive what so ever.

Metro might or might not be "productive" but that statement is relative to the type of user and the task, and as I explained in my other post the desktop is the same and I'll use it the same way I do on Windows 7. My workflow and productivity hasn't taken any hit from the start screen or metro apps. The same probably applies to many others as well.

If it fails or not we'll see, but I doubt it, not with all the tablets and ultrabooks that are coming out to take advantage of it specifically.

smooth3006 said,

im not going to argue other than saying ill be waiting for this OS to fall flat on it's rear.

You'll be waiting a while then. I wouldn't advise holding your breath during that time, it would be bad for your health.

Windows 8's Metro additions has no effect on productivity. The desktop is a single click away and the computer can then be used just like with Windows 7. There's no difference. The start button is where it's always been, there's just no physical icon taking up taskbar space now. Move your mouse there and it appears.

And the inane arguments about the Start Screen covering up everything is just nonsense. When you're launching an app (those that you haven't already pinned, which will arguably be most of them) the start screen is on screen for a second or two at most. Just as long as the start menu of old was.

smooth3006 said,
they should of ditched metro for non touchscreens.

The proper way to write that would be "they should have ... " as the word "of" does not belong in that sentence.

smooth3006 said,
they should of ditched metro for non touchscreens.

The proper way to write that would be "they should have ... " as the word "of" does not belong in that sentence.

Windows Nashville said,
Windows 8: Because you'd rather pay $19.99 for a "Metro Weather App" than bookmark a weather forecast site for free.

Comment fail. A large number of apps will be free, including weather apps. Although by your logic I guess that explains why the iPad is just a collection of website links then. Oh wait...

Today a customer brought his laptop to me still in the box and wanted me to set him up. So I did all the updates for him and gave him an AV. Removed some of the free toolbars and updated the 3rd party applications. The Laptop is running Windows 7. Now had the new laptop been running Windows 8 what am I supose to do? I'm $50 per hour, but obviously if I spend 2 hours showing how to run windows 8 and even then he won't have a clue, I wouldn't charge him $100 for that. So basically i'm wasting my time having to show people how to use windows 8. If I don't show him how to use it she will take it home and be so lost and i'll feel bad for them.

Then once they get home they start calling me because they are so confused. So then what do I do? I'm usually $21.40 per phone support call. Do I bill them every time they call me, because they will be calling me A LOT. I don't think it's right. There again my time is being wasted.

I hope i'm not the only self employed computer repair person that is frighened by the thought of supporting windows 8. Sure support calls for Windows 8 is job security to a point. After that it's just time wasting and frustration.

You wouldn't know how hard it is sometimes to get someone to click the start button. A button that has been on the bottom right of their screen for years. Let alone a button which is now hidden and has to be touched to appear and which disappears when you move just a bit away from it while still on it. Sure there is the Windows key which may be easier if they can find it.

Edited by warwagon, Aug 2 2012, 6:36pm :

warwagon said,
Today a customer brought his laptop to me still in the box and wanted me to set him up. So I did all the updates for him and gave him an AV. Removed some of the free toolbars and updated the 3rd party applications. The Laptop is running Windows 7. Now had the new laptop been running Windows 8 what am I supose to do? I'm $50 per hour, but obviously if I spend 2 hours showing how to run windows 8 and even then he won't have a clue, I wouldn't charge him $100 for that. So basically i'm wasting my time having to show people how to use windows 8. If I don't show him how to use it she will take it home and be so lost and i'll feel bad for them.

Then once they get home they start calling me because they are so confused. So then what do I do? I'm usually $21.40 per phone support call. Do I bill them every time they call me, because they will be calling me A LOT. I don't think it's right. There again my time is being wasted.

I hope i'm not the only self employed computer repair person that is frighened by the thought of supporting windows 8. Sure support calls for Windows 8 is job security to a point. After that it's just time wasting and frustration.

You wouldn't know how hard it is sometimes to get someone to click the start button. A button that has been on the bottom right of their screen for years. Let alone a button which is now hidden and has to be touched to appear and which disappears when you move just a bit away from it while still on it. Sure there is the Windows key which may be easier if they can find it.

Also don't even talk about how to teach people how to make all their old programs to work by constantly keep clicking the desktop app and how to turn off their computer finding hidden buttons on the screen or finding the normal windows key.

Thing about hot corner is so interesting. I noticed with so many people that when they move a mouse they move it again in order to put cursor inside image thumbnail which ultimately causes thumbnail to dissapear.

Probably a habit from Windows 7, where you actually do hover over the taskbar button, then a specific thumbnail (for multiple grouped windows).

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