Google acquires SlickLogin; created way to transfer passwords via sound

Google has acquired yet another small startup company, and this one promises to offer a very different way to send passwords to websites. The Israel-based startup SlickLogin, created a method that uses sound to transfer passwords, was bought by Google late on Friday. As usual, specific financial details were not disclosed.

The official SlickLogin website posted up news of the acquisition, stating that Google "shares our core beliefs that logging in should be easy instead of frustrating, and authentication should be effective without getting in the way." The idea is that if you have a notebook or desktop PC and you surf over to a website that has been enabled by SlickLogin's method, it will send out a sound from the PC's speakers that cannot be heard by human ears. A smartphone with a SlickLogin app can listen for that sound and then send it back, and thus login to the service.

It's possible that Google could set up the technology it has acquired from SlickLogin as an alternative way to log into its online servers via Android devices. This is not the first time sound-based technology has been proposed to transfer information. Microsoft Research came up with the idea of using sound to move files in between smartphones in August 2013.

Source: SlickLogin via TechCrunch | Image via SlickLogin

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Nokia: India tax dispute won't delay selling Devices and Services to Microsoft

Next Story

Windows Phone app certification times down to as low as one hour

20 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I do hope its not as automatic as it sounds, Imagine logging into a friends account just because that phone is in the room even if they aren't

Well, not transmitted by sound, but able to coordinate and communicate by sound, allowing airgapped computers to transmit sensitive info out to the WAN.

Geezy said,
Well, not transmitted by sound, but able to coordinate and communicate by sound, allowing airgapped computers to transmit sensitive info out to the WAN.

It is not really clear, maybe intentionally:
"each time he would wipe a machine then turn it back one, it would be infected by at least one of the remaining machines that had yet to be wiped."
it seems that an infected machine was able to push the virus to a cleaned one as well.

n_K said,

Article is complete fud and has been proved so on here before.

Well, the Fraunhofer Institute is a respectable institution....

Fritzly said,

Well, the Fraunhofer Institute is a respectable institution....


No, the research team there proved sending data using microphones was possible, the 'badbios' stuff is complete fluff/nonsense and unrelated to them or their research.

n_K said,

No, the research team there proved sending data using microphones was possible, the 'badbios' stuff is complete fluff/nonsense and unrelated to them or their research.

Not exactly: "Hanspach is sceptical that the malware "badBIOS" exists in the manner that was discussed in the technology news articles of the past weeks. However, what sounds like science fiction today might well be reality in five years, the scientist says. The danger from an audio botnet would be considerable. This applies to critical infrastructures, for example."

also anything using RF, like HFC networks, Ethernet networks, etc... they all use sound frequencies to communicate... that's why the better the MHz rating on Ethernet cable, the more reliably you can push faster data rates... Coaxial cable does the same thing... RF is just waves...