Google delaying Exchange ActiveSync for Windows Phone cut off

Will Microsoft and Google ever get on? It’s like Apple and Microsoft. And Apple and Samsung. None of the companies hate each other, but when any of them get a whiff of serious competition, they go into overdrive with belittling wars of words, the threatening of legal action and/or removing support for competitor’s products.

That’s exactly what Google did to Microsoft and Windows Phone users, removing ActiveSync support for any new Windows Phone adopters with a Gmail account, to the surprise of Microsoft of course. But a month later Google backed down, sort of, extending the cut off deadline to July 31st.

Well that was yesterday and it’s now come to light that the support will again be extended to 31st December 2013. A Microsoft spokesperson has said:

We’ve reached an agreement with Google to extend support for new Windows Phone connections to the Google Sync service through December 31, 2013

Microsoft had been working on adding support for Google’s CalDAV and CardDAV protocols for future versions of Windows Phone to sync with Gmail accounts, which has subsequently arrived in the form of GDR2. Now, the only problem is that GDR2 isn’t hitting every Windows Phone 8 handset just yet, apart from some (read unlocked) HTC 8X handsets and a few of the latest Lumia handsets. 

And let's not forget the millions of Windows Phone 7 users which will also suffer the same fate come January 1st 2014. Microsoft has yet to mention any upcoming update for WP7 that would address this issue. 

So, is this Google warming to Microsoft? Did Windows Phone users, no matter how small in number, rattle Google’s cage enough to make them realise they were being a little tough? Or could it just be that Microsoft and Google sat down and worked out a compromise? Our bet is on the latter.

Source: The Verge
Via: Cool Smart Phone | Image via PandaApp

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Andrew (author): This has already been addressed in Windows Phone 7.8. Build 8858 now adds new Google accounts as IMAP accounts and disables calendar and contacts sync (same behavior as Windows 8 Mail). Build 8862 is current for Windows Phone 7, which fixed the live tile issue. Most carriers deployed both builds at the same time.

SK[ said,]What will be used on WP instead of AS?

This does not effect Mail delivery only Contact and Calendar delivery, In Windows Phone GDR2 they will support CalDev and CardDev which will allow Google to Deliver the Contact and Calendar data without using AS

Could just be that Microsoft is so incompetent in getting this minor update out they had to go begging to google to extend the deadline. 6 months later and they still can't roll out the fix, pathetic.

efjay said,
Could just be that Microsoft is so incompetent in getting this minor update out they had to go begging to google to extend the deadline. 6 months later and they still can't roll out the fix, pathetic.
That's probably because CalDAV and CardDAV are a nightmare to implementate because everyone that's using it, has another implementation.

Given that these (caldav and carddav) are open standards and widely used the real question is why these weren't in Windows Phone to begin with. Btw, Google isn't innocent given that they were also going to kill off caldav and carddav support in favour of their own proprietary protocol - it wasn't until Microsoft kicked up a stink (along with Apple but less publicly) that they back tracked.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
Given that these (caldav and carddav) are open standards and widely used the real question is why these weren't in Windows Phone to begin with. Btw, Google isn't innocent given that they were also going to kill off caldav and carddav support in favour of their own proprietary protocol - it wasn't until Microsoft kicked up a stink (along with Apple but less publicly) that they back tracked.
EAS is supported by ALL mobile operating systems and it is the de-facto with that. So, it's more logical for WP to miss support for CalDAV and CardDAV than for Android to miss support for EAS. Beside, CalDAV and CardDAV don't support lots of awesome features that EAS does have.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
Given that these (caldav and carddav) are open standards and widely used the real question is why these weren't in Windows Phone to begin with. Btw, Google isn't innocent given that they were also going to kill off caldav and carddav support in favour of their own proprietary protocol - it wasn't until Microsoft kicked up a stink (along with Apple but less publicly) that they back tracked.

I'm not sure how widely used caldav and caddav are (i'd imagine not that widely) but I wouldn't say that Google backtracked. They've axed support for these protocols for all but a few prominent customers including Microsoft. I bet they will pull the plug on it entirely before too long.

MS couldn't include support for everything from day 1 and it makes sense to exclude second rate niche protocols.

jakem1 said,
I'm not sure how widely used caldav and caddav are (i'd imagine not that widely) but I wouldn't say that Google backtracked. They've axed support for these protocols for all but a few prominent customers including Microsoft. I bet they will pull the plug on it entirely before too long.

MS couldn't include support for everything from day 1 and it makes sense to exclude second rate niche protocols.

Yahoo supports CalDav and CardDav their own services along with the iCloud service as well and I'm sure there are a few other ones in emerging markets as well. Sorry but when Google promotes itself as 'do no evil' and 'we're open' but then turn around not only to end ActiveSync (which is understandable given that it is closed and costs money to licence off Microsoft) as well as legitimately open standards like CalDav and CardDav in favour of their own 'Google Calendar API' I really have to ask myself whether the Google-fans need to realise that their chosen 'white knight' is worse than Microsoft in many regards.

Google is definitely no "white knight", but it is their service and they can do anything they want with it. Now if only Microsoft would fix a few things with Outlook.com, I'd switch over to that in a heartbeat...